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Fifth Month
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5th Passage Hand
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It Is Said



It is said that only a man knows how to tie a Turian camisk on a girl properly.
There are many such sayings on Gor.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 160


Indeed, there are many such sayings. Here are relevant references from the Books where sayings are mentioned.
It is not meant to be anything other than the facts of the matter.
Arrive at your own conclusions.

I wish you well,
Fogaban






Supporting References

Indeed, there is a saying on Gor, a saying whose origin is lost in the past of this strange planet, that one who speaks of Home Stones should stand, for matters of honor are here involved, and honor is respected in the barbaric codes of Gor.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 27


My father then explained to me something of the legends of the Priest-Kings, and I gathered that they seemed to be true to this degree at least that the Priest-Kings could destroy or control whatever that they were, in effect, the divinities of this world. It was supposed that they were aware of all that transpired on their planet, but, if so, I was informed that they seemed, on the whole, to take little note of it. It was rumored, according to my father, that they cultivated holiness in their mountains, and in their contemplation could not be concerned with the realities and evils of the outside and unimportant world. They were, so to speak, absentee divinities, existent but remote, not to be bothered with the fears and turmoil of the mortals beyond their mountains. This conjecture, the seeking of holiness, however, seemed to me to fit not well with the sickening fate apparently awaiting those who attempted the mountains. I found it difficult to conceive of one of those theoretical saints rousing himself from contemplation to hurl the scraps of interlopers to the plains below.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Pages 30 - 31


"Frankly," said my father, "I believe the ship was remotely controlled from the Sardar Mountains, as are said to be all the Voyages of Acquisition."
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 32


Accordingly, for subtle communication or the fullest expression of thought, the machine was inferior to a skilled linguist. The machine, however, according to my father, retained the advantage that its mistakes would not be intentional, and that its translations, even if inadequate, would be honest.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 40


"The caste structure," said my father patiently, with perhaps the trace of a smile on his face, "is relatively immobile, but not frozen, and depends on more than birth. For example, if a child in his schooling shows that he can raise caste, as the expression is, he is permitted to do so. But, similarly, if a child does not show the aptitude expected of his caste, whether it be, say, that of physician or warrior, he is lowered in caste."
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 42


I had seen few women, but knew that they, when free, were promoted or demoted within the caste system according to the same standards and criteria as the men, although this varied, I was told, considerably from city to city.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 44


It is said that a tarn knows who is a tarnsman and who is not, and that those who are not die in this first meeting.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 51


Most significantly, while these members of the High Castes perform their portions of the ritual, the Guards of the Home Stone temporarily withdraw to the interior of the cylinder, leaving the celebrant, it is said, alone with the Priest-Kings.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 68


According to the plan of the Council of Ko-ro-ba, exactly at the time of the sacrifice, at the twentieth Gorean hour, or midnight, I was to drop to the roof of the highest cylinder in Ar, slay the daughter of the Ubar, and carry away her body and the Home Stone, discarding the former in the swamp country north of Ar and carrying the latter home to Ko-ro-ba. The girl, Sana, whom I carried on the saddle before me, would dress in the heavy robes and veils of the Ubar's daughter and return in her place to the interior of the cylinder. Presumably, it would be at least a matter of minutes before her identity was discovered, and, before that, she would, take the poison provided by the Council.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 69


"You must take me with you," she said, eyes still downcast. "Why?" I asked. After all, according to the rude codes of Gor, I owed her nothing, indeed, considering her attempt on my life, which had been foiled only by the fortuitous net of Nar's web, I would have been within my rights to slay her, abandoning her body to the water lizards. Naturally, I was not looking at things from precisely the Gorean point of view, but she would have no way of knowing that. How could she know that I would not treat her as – according to the rough justice of Gor – she deserved?
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 92


She tried frantically to readjust the folds of her veil, but with both hands I tore it fully away, and she lay at my feet, as it is said on Gor, face-stripped.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 98


"Talena spoke, her voice muffled in the hood. "Scavengers come to feast on the bodies of wounded tarnsmen." It was a Gorean proverb, which seemed to be singularly inappropriate, coming from a hooded captive.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 116


Talena stood up. "Tonight," she said, "let us drink wine." It was a Gorean expression, a fatalistic maxim in which the events of the morrow were cast into the laps of the Priest-Kings.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 132


I noted one thing that seemed puzzling for a moment. Pa-Kur had not protected his rear with the customary third ditch and rampart. I could see foragers and merchants moving to and from the camp unimpeded. I reasoned that Pa-Kur had nothing to fear and consequently chose not to employ his siege slaves and prisoners in unnecessary and time-consuming works. Still, it seemed that he had committed an error, if only according to the manuals of siege practice. If I had had a considerable force of men at my disposal, I could have exploited that error.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Pages 164 - 165


I shuddered involuntarily at the thought of the uncontrolled hordes of Pa-Kur among the spires of Ar, butchering, pillaging, burning, raping – or, as the Goreans will have it, washing the bridges in blood.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 171


Mintar looked up, and he, too, seemed pleased. "You are the only man who has ever escaped the tarn death," he said, something of wonder in his voice. "Perhaps it is true, as they say, that you are that warrior brought every thousand years to Gor brought by the Priest-Kings to change a world."
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 174


It seemed unlikely that Pa-Kur would be so politically naive as to use the girl before she had publicly accepted him as her Free Companion, according to the rites of Ar.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 176


It is almost as if the city itself were identified with the Home Stone, as if it were to the city what life is to a man. The myths of these matters have it that while the Home Stone survives, so, too, must the city.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 23


At such a time a man may not be spoken to, for according to the Gorean way of thinking pity humiliates both he who pities and he who is pitied. According to the Gorean way, one may love but one may not pity.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 31


It is said that only the heart of the mountain larl brings more luck than that of the vicious and cunning sleen.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 37


There is a Gorean proverb that a man who is returning to his city is not to be detained.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 37


One looks into the blood in one's cupped hands. It is said that if one sees one's visage black and wasted one will die of disease, if one sees oneself torn and scarlet one will die in battle, if one sees oneself old and white haired, one will die in peace and leave children.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 38


In the next flash of lightning I saw the white robes of an Initiate, the shaven head and the sad eyes of one of the Blessed Caste, servants it is said of the Priest-Kings themselves.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 40


The Gorean is suspicious of the stranger, particularly in the vicinity of his native walls. Indeed, in Gorean the same word is used for both stranger and enemy.

There was reputedly one exception to this generally prevalent attitude of hostility toward the stranger, the city of Tharna, which, according to rumor, was willing to engage in what on Gor might be accounted the adventure of hospitality.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 49


There is a saying on Gor that the laws of a city extend no further than its walls.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 50


Then, for a Gorean woman, she did an incredible thing. Without speaking, she slowly unwound the veil from her face and dropped it to her shoulders. She stood before me, as it is said, face-stripped, and that by her own hand.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 55


There is no distinctive garment for a male slave on Gor, since, as it is said, it is not well for them to discover how numerous they are.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 66


Once one has been a tarnsman, it is said, one must return again and again to the giant, savage birds.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 130


"We are of the same chain," I said.
It was a saying we had developed in the mines.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 163


The power and knowledge of the Priest-Kings is perhaps beyond the comprehension of mortal men, or, as it is said on Gor, of the Men Below the Mountains.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 172


Chronology in Ar is figured, happily enough, not from its Administrator Lists, but from its mythical founding by the first man on Gor, a hero whom the Priest-Kings are said to have formed from the mud of the earth and the blood of tarns.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 179


And so it was that I took the cords from her hand, and in the same night Lara who had once been the proud Tatrix of Tharna became according to the ancient rites of her city my slave girl and a free woman.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 209


And as she had spoken, according to the customs of Tharna, her words had become the law and from that day forth no woman of Tharna might wear a mask.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 247


It is said that the Priest-Kings know whatever transpires on their world and that the mere lifting of their hand can summon all the powers of the universe.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 13


It is said that neither the physical intricacies of the cosmos nor the emotions of human beings are beyond the scope of their power, that the feelings of men and the motions of atoms and stars are as one to them, that they can control the very forces of gravity and invisibly sway the hearts of human beings, but of this latter claim I wonder, for once on a road to Ko-ro-ba, my city, I met one who had been a messenger of Priest-Kings, one who had been capable of disobeying them, one from the shards of whose burnt and blasted skull I had removed a handful of golden wire.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 14


He had won his freedom though it had, as the Goreans say, led him to the Cities of Dust, where, I think, not even Priest-Kings care to follow.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 14


It is thus that, should the spears miss their mark, he sacrifices his life for his companions who will, while the larl attacks him, make good their escape. This may seem cruel but in the long run it tends to be conservative of human life; it is better, as the Goreans say, for one man to die than many.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 20


First she boiled and simmered a kettle of Sullage, a common Gorean soup consisting of three standard ingredients and, as it is said, whatever else may be found, saving only the rocks of the field.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 44


I wondered if many of Treve's women were as beautiful as Vika. If they were it was surprising that tarnsmen from all the cities of Gor would not have descended on the place, as the saying goes, to try chain luck.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 61


According to the Gorean way of looking at things a taste of the slave ring is thought to be occasionally beneficial to all women, even the exalted Free Companions.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 67


"It is said below the mountains that Priest-Kings know all that occurs on Gor."
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 125


She removed her hand from my arm and stepped back, trembling, her eyes frightened. The color had drained from her face. "I did not think of what I was saying," she said.
Terrified, she, as the expression is, knelt to the whip, assuming the position of the slave girl who is to be punished, her wrists crossed beneath her as though bound and her head touching the floor, leaving the bow of her back exposed.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Pages 201 - 202


I smiled at Vika's very natural correction of her mode of addressing me, for a slave girl is seldom permitted, at least publicly, to address her master by his name, only his title. The privilege of using his name, of having it on her lips, is, according to the most approved custom, reserved for that of a free woman, in particular a Free Companion. Gorean thinking on this matter tends to be expressed by the saying that a slave girl grows bold if her lips are allowed to touch the name of her master. On the other hand, I, like many Gorean masters, provided the girl was not testing or challenging me, and provided that free women, or others, were not present whom I had no wish to offend or upset, preferred as a matter of fact to have my own name on the girl's lips, for I think, with acknowledged vanity, that there are few sounds as pleasurable as the sound of one's own name on the lips of a beautiful woman.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 206


"It is said that there is Nest Trust between you and Misk," he said. "Now we will see if that is truly so."
"What do you mean?" I asked.
"If there is Nest Trust between you," said Sarm, his antennae curling, "Misk will be ready to die for you."
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 264


The Priest-Kings who had served him had, on the whole at least, believed that what they were doing was required by the laws of the Nest, but now with Sarm's disappearance Misk, though only Fifth Born, acceded to the title of highest born, and it was to him now, according to the same laws of the Nest, that their allegiance was now owed.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 267


The body of Sarm, I learned, had been burned in the Chamber of the Mother, according to the custom of Priest-Kings, for he had been First Born and beloved of the Mother.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 311


I saw even a black larl, a huge catlike predator more commonly found in mountainous regions; it was stalking away, retreating unhurried like a king; before what, I asked myself, would even the black larl flee; and I asked myself how far it had been driven; perhaps even from the mountains of Ta-Thassa, that loomed in this hemisphere, Gor's southern, at the shore of Thassa, the sea, said to be in the myths without a farther shore.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 2


The Wagon Peoples grow no food, nor do they have manufacturing as we know it. They are herders and it is said, killers.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 4


The Wagon Peoples, it is said, slay strangers.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 9


The Wagon Peoples, of all those on Gor that I know, are the only ones that have a clan of torturers, trained as carefully as scribes or physicians, in the arts of detaining life.
Some of these men have achieved fortune and fame in various Gorean cities, for their services to Initiates and Ubars, and others with an interest in the arts of detection and persuasion. For some reason they have all worn hoods. It is said they remove the hood only when the sentence is death, so that it is only condemned men who have seen whatever it is that lies beneath the hood.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 9 - 10


The omens, I understood, had not been favorable in more than a hundred years. I suspected that this might be due to the hostilities and bickerings of the peoples among themselves; where people did not wish to unite, where they relished their autonomy, where they nursed old grievances and sang the glories of vengeance raids, where they considered all others, even those of the other Peoples, as beneath themselves, there would not be likely to exist the conditions for serious confederation, a joining together of the wagons, as the saying is; under such conditions it was not surprising that the "omens tended to be unfavorable", indeed, what more inauspicious omens could there be?
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 12 - 13


I have already mentioned the clan of torturers. The members of these clans, however, like the Year Keepers and Singers, are all expected, first and foremost, to be, as it is said, of the wagons namely to follow, tend and protect the bosk, to be superb in the saddle, and to be skilled with the weapons of both the hunt and war.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 12 (footnote)


"I am of Ko-ro-ba," I said. "You have heard of her."
The Tuchuk's face tightened. Then he grinned. "I have heard sing of Ko-ro-ba," he said.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 18


"Have you heard," he asked, "that the Wagon Peoples slay strangers?"
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 20


The wagons are said to be countless, the animals without number. Both of these claims, are of course, mistaken, and the Ubars of the Wagon Peoples know well each wagon and the number of branded beasts in the various herds;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 21


I suppose the Tuchuks worship nothing, in the common sense of that word, but it is true they hold many things holy, among them the bosk and the skills of arms, but chief of the things before which the proud Tuchuk stands ready to remove his helmet is the sky, the simple, vast beautiful sky, from which falls the rain that, in his myths, formed the earth, and the bosks, and the Tuchuks.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 28


By one fire I could see a squat Tuchuk, hands on hips, dancing and stamping about by himself, drunk on fermented milk curds, dancing, according to Kamchak, to please the sky.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 28


It might be added that there are two items which the Wagon Peoples will not sell or trade to Turia, one is a living bosk and the other is a girl from the city itself, though the latter are sometimes, for the sport of the young men, allowed, as it is said, to run for the city.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 58


I had determined, of course, to my satisfaction, having spoken with him once, that the boy, or young man, was indeed Gorean; his people and their people before them and as far back as anyone knew had been, as it is said, of the Wagons.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 68


There is a saying on Gor, "Gold has no caste." It is a saying of which the merchants are fond. Indeed, secretly among themselves, I have heard, they regard themselves as the highest caste on Gor, though they would not say so for fear of rousing the indignation of other castes.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 84


The institution of Love War is an ancient one among the Turians and the Wagon Peoples, according to the Year Keepers antedating even the Omen Year.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 115


Lastly it might be mentioned, thinking it is of some interest, musicians on Gor are never enslaved; they may, of course, be exiled, tortured, slain and such; it is said, perhaps truly, that he who makes music must, like the tarn and the Vosk gull, be free.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 154


"What is it you wish in Turia?" inquired Harold.
"Nothing important," I remarked.
"A woman?" he asked.
"No," I said, "a golden sphere."
"I know of it," said Harold, "it was stolen from the wagon of Kutaituchik." He looked at me. "It is said to be worthless."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 186


"Are the girls who attend to the baths during the day as beautiful as it is said?" I inquired. The bath girls of Turia are almost as famous as those of Ar.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 188


"It is said," I muttered, "that the tarn knows who is a tarnsman and who is not and that it slays him who is not."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 190


"I was never a customer," he said, "and I often wondered – like yourself apparently if the bath girls of Turia are as lovely as it is said."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 192


"It was an amusement on my part," smiled Saphrar, "to speak your name at that time to see what you would do to give you something, so to speak, to stir in your wine."
It was a Turian saying. They used wines in which, as a matter of fact, things could be and were, upon occasion, stirred – mostly spices and sugars.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 198


Her eyes were looking at me over the rim of her bowl as she drank. "It is said," she remarked, her eyes mischievous, "that any man who frees a slave girl is a fool."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 285


Moreover, I reminded myself of my work, and that a warrior cannot well encumber himself with a woman, particularly not a free woman. His companion, as it is said, is peril and steel.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 287


"On Gor," I said, "the myths have it that only the woman who has been an utter slave can be truly free."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 289


"The Gorean myths have it," I said, "that the women longs for this identity – to be herself in being his – if only for the moment of paradox in which she is slave and thus freed."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 291


"It is said," remarked the girl, "that Vella, whether she knows it or not, longs to be a slave the utter slave of a man – if only for an hour."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 294


As the Goreans have it, there is in this a war in which the woman can respect only that man who can reduce her to utter defeat.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 297


As the Goreans have it, there is in this a war in which the woman can respect only that man who can reduce her to utter defeat.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 298


"It is said by Goreans," remarked the girl, very seriously, "that every woman, whether she knows it or not, longs to be a slave – the utter slave of a man – if but for an hour."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 299


Then she smiled. "It is said by Goreans," she remarked, with very great seriousness, with mock bitterness, "that in a collar a woman can be only a woman."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 299


"On Gor," I said, "it is said that a woman who wears a collar can be only a woman."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 303


"It is said," remarked Kamchak, "that the sword of Ha-Keel is scarcely less swift and cunning than that of Pa-Kur, the Master of Assassins."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 323


Pa-Kur, who had been Master of the Assassins, had led a league of tributary cities to attack Imperial Ar in the time when its Home Stone had been stolen and its Ubar forced to flee. The city had fallen and Pa-Kur, though of low caste, had aspired to inherit the imperial mantle of Marlenus, had dared to lift his eyes to the throne of Empire and place about his neck the golden medallion of a Ubar, a thing forbidden to such as he in the myths of the Counter-Earth.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 6


Elizabeth, trembling, lowered her head to the floor and crossed her wrists under her, kneeling, as it is said, to the whip.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 46


In a girl's collar lock there would be either six pins or six disks, one each, it is said, for each letter in the Gorean word for female slave, Kajira;
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 51


"I have heard," she said, smiling up at me, "that it is only a Free Companion who is accorded the dignities of the couch.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 56


"Actually," I said to Elizabeth, "this is very rare. Thentis does not trade the beans for black wine. I have heard of a cup of black wine in Ar, some years ago, selling for a silver eighty-piece. Even in Thentis black wine is used commonly only in High Caste homes."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 107


At the minor blocks in the small houses, or even the minor blocks in the Curulean, sales are conducted with a swiftness and dispatch that gives the girl little time to interest and impress buyers, with the result that even a very fine girl, to her indignation and shame, may be sold for only an average price to an average buyer, who may use her for little more than, as it is said, kettle and mat.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 112


Female slaves, incidentally, are always sold barefoot. It is good for the girl to feel wood and sawdust beneath her feet, it is said.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 113


"Barbarians, I have heard," I said, "do not train well."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 118


I knew that few men could, if a bath girl did not wish it, come close to them in the water. They spend much of the day in the water and, it is said, are more at ease in that element than the Cosian song fish.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 161


It is said that men once having seen Thassa are never willing to leave it again, that those who have left the sea are never again truly happy.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 240


It is said that the chains of a slave girl are heaviest in Port Kar.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 305


"It is said you claim to be Claudia Tentia Hinrabia," said Cernus.
The girl lifted her head wildly. "It is true!" she cried. "It is true, Master!"
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 313


"Claudia Tentia Hinrabia," said Cernus to those assembled, while he quaffed yet another goblet of Ka-la-na, "is well known throughout Ar as a most strict and demanding mistress. It is said that once, when a slave dropped a mirror, she had the poor girl's ears and nose cut off, and then sold the then worthless wench."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 315


I could smell the sea, gleaming Thassa, in the myths said to be without a farther shore.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 1


As I have mentioned, Port Kar claims the suzerainty of the delta. Accordingly, frequently, bands of armed men, maintaining allegiance to one or the other of the warring, rival Ubars of Port Kar, enter the delta to, as they say, collect taxes.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 8


"I mean you," I said, "and your people, no harm." I smiled. "I want only as much of your marsh as the width of my craft," I said, "and that only for as long as it takes to pass." This was a paraphrase of a saying common on Gor, given by passing strangers to those through whose territories they would travel. Only the span of the wings of my tarn, only the girth of my tharlarion, only the width of my body, and no more, and that but for the time it takes to pass.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 11


According to Gorean custom a slave is an animal, and may be disposed of as an animal, in whatever way the master might wish, whenever he might please.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 25


"The mouths of rence girls," commented Clitus, "are said to be as large as the delta itself."
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 95


The dancing girls of Port Kar are said to be the best of all Gor.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 100


I expected I would again, however, return to Thassa. She, as it is said, cannot be forgotten.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 140


It is said that there is now a Home Stone in Port Kar."
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 255


The men of Treve are said to be among the proudest and most ruthless on Gor. They are most fond of danger and free women, whom they bind and steal from civilized cities to carry to their mountain lair as slave girls. It is said the city can be reached only on tarnback.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 272


"The mouths of rence girls," I said, "are said to be as large as the delta itself."
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 286


"A ship must be built," said Samos. "A ship different from any other."

I looked at him.

"One that can sail beyond the world's end," he said.

This was an expression, in the first knowledge, for the sea some hundred pasangs west of Cos and Tyros, beyond which the ships of Goreans do not go, or if go, do not return.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 312


As it is said, masters do not much interfere in the squabbles of slaves.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 61


It is said that the tarn knows who is a tarnsman and who is not, and if one approaches him who is not, he will seize him and rip him to pieces.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 91 - 92


It is said that Ka-la-na has an unusual effect on a female.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 114


"It is said," said Verna, "that Ka-la-na wine makes any woman a slave, if but for an hour."
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 124


It is said that only a man knows how to tie a Turian camisk on a girl properly. There are many such sayings on Gor.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 160


"It was Verna and her band who captured me," I said.
"It is said she is beautiful," said the guard. "Is it true?"
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 185


It was also said that he would use a woman only once, claiming that he had, he, Rask of Treve, in once using her, emptied her, exhausted her, taken from her all she had to give, and that, thus, she could no longer be of interest to him. No man on Gor, it was said, could so humble, or diminish, a woman as Rask of Treve.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 192


It had been decided that she should now undertake the journey to the Sardar, which, according to the teachings of the Caste of Initiates, is enjoined on every Gorean by the Priest-Kings, an obligation which is to be fulfilled prior to their attaining their twenty-fifth year.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 233


I looked down. "It is said," I said," I have heard that Rask of Treve is a hard master."

She smiled. "That is true," she said.

"It is said," I blurted out, "that no man on Gor can so diminish or humble a woman as Rask of Treve."

"I have not been diminished or humbled," said Ena. "On the other hand, if Rask of Treve wished to diminish or humble a woman, I expect he would do it quite well."

"Suppose," I said, "a girl had been insolent, or arrogant with him?"

"Such a girl, doubtless," said Ena, "would then be well diminished and humbled." She laughed. "Rask of Treve would doubtless teach her, her slavery well."

This news did not reassure me.

I looked at her. "It is said he uses a woman but once," I wept, "and that he then, with contempt, brands her and discards her."
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 276


"It is said that Rask of Treve," I said, "has a great appetite for women, and contempt, for them."
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 278


I knew that my body was a slave body, and that it was owned, and that it stood in constant jeopardy of fierce, swift punishment by a strong master, whether it might deserve that punishment or not. But, too, I felt that I had, according to Gorean justice, well earned my beating and my branding, and my torturous confinement in the slave box.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 319


"It is said, among the other girls, that you have told them that you are not as other women, that you do not have their weaknesses."
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 338


"I am chained at your feet," I said. It was a saying of a Gorean slave girl, to express her feelings.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 347


"I am informed by Samos, who keeps spies, that Rask of Treve came free to Port Kar, and alone, where he was captured." He looked at me. "What might it have been that he sought?"
"I do not know," I whispered.
"It is said," said Bosk of Port Kar, "that he sought a slave, whose name was Elinor."
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 362


It is not unknown to him, for rumors have been spread, that she, too, holds captive in those forests the girl Talena, his daughter. It is said he is shamed that she has been a slave, and that he intends to free her, and keep her sequestered in Ar, that her degradation not be publicly exhibited.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 367


"It is said that those of Treve are worthy enemies," said Samos.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 9


"It is said," said Samos, "that only weaklings, and fools, and men who deserve to be slave girls, fall slave to women."
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 13


"He had once captured Verna," Continued Arn, "but she had escaped." He looked at me. "This did not please Marlenus," said he.
"Further," said one of his men, "it is said that Verna now holds his daughter slave."
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 24


It is said that panther girls, conquered, make incredible slaves.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Pages 28 - 29


Of these, to be honest, and to give the merchants their due, I will admit that Tabor and Teletus are rather strictly controlled. It is said, however, by some of the merchants there, that this manner of caution and restriction, has to some extent diminished their position in the spheres of trade.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 43


"Do you know Marlenus is in the forest?" she asked.
"Yes," I said, "I have heard that."
"Do you know the location of his camp?" she asked.
"No," I said, "other than the fact that it is said to be somewhere north or northeast of Laura."
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 90


She had obviously now, as it is said, deep in her body, begun to feel her collar.
. . .
The Goreans claim that in each woman there is a free companion, proud and beautiful, worthy and noble, and in each, too, a slave girl. The companion seeks for her companion; the slave girl for her master. It is further said, that on the couch, the Gorean girl, whether slave or free, who has had the experience, who has tried all loves, begs for a master.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 102


There is a Gorean saying that free women, raised gently in the high cylinders, in their robes of concealment, unarmed, untrained in weapons, may, by the slaver, be plucked like flowers.
There is no such saying pertaining to panther girls.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 118


Sometimes it takes, according to the Goreans, a generation for the forest to forgive its injury, and return to men, gracious and forgiving, in all its beauty.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 119


"Yes," laughed Verna, "according to the codes of the warriors and by the rites of the city of Ar, no longer is Talena kin or daughter of Marlenus of Ar."
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 131


"There is a saying among panther girls," she said, "that any girl who permits herself to fall to men desires in her heart to be their slave."
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 133


"I have heard," I said, "that panther girls, once conquered, make splendid slaves."
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 134


"It is said," I said, "that in the band of Hura there are more than a hundred women."
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 134


One does not inform slaves of the plans of masters. Slaves are deliberately kept uninformed, and ignorant. It increases their dependence, their helplessness. They do not know what is to be done with them. They do not know whence they may be herded, or what they may be forced to do. Leave them alone, it is said, with their ignorance and their fears. It is enough for the master to know what is to be done with them.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 134


A girl in a collar, as it is said, is not permitted inhibitions.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 165


I reminded myself that it was said that panther girls, once conquered, make excellent slaves.
I think it is a true saying.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 170


The auctioneer, in his skill, would have demonstrated undreampt latencies in the wench on sale, that her desirabilities were not merely placid and visual, but organic, reflexive and sensual, that she, properly handled, was the sort of woman who, as the Goreans say, could not help but kiss the whip that beats her.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 221


I looked out to sea, across the vast, placid waters of Thassa, now bright with oblique moonlight. We three stood together on the beach, on the sands, among the stones, and observed Thassa, the murmuring, gleaming, elemental vastness, Thassa, the Sea, said in the myths to be without a farther shore.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 255


In the legends of others they appear as blond giants, breathing fire, shattering doors, giants taller than trees, with pointed ears and eyes like fire and hands like great claws and hooks; they are seen as savages, as barbarians, as beasts blood-thirsty and mad with killing, with braided hair, clad in furs and leather, with bare chests, with great axes which, at a single stroke, can fell a tree or cut a man in two. It is said they appear as though from nowhere to pillage, and to burn and rape, and then, among the flames, as quickly, vanish to their swift ships, carrying their booty with them, whether it be bars of silver, or goblets of gold, or silken sheets, knotted and bulging with plate, and coins and gems, or merely women, bound, their clothing torn away, whose bodies they find pleasing.

In Gorean legends the Priest-Kings are said to have formed man from the mud of the earth and the blood of tarns. In the legends of Torvaldsland, man has a different origin. Gods, meeting in council, decided to form a slave for themselves, for they were all gods, and had no slaves. They took a hoe, an instrument for working the soil, and put it among them. They then sprinkled water upon this implement and rubbed upon it sweat from their bodies. From this hoe was formed most men. On the other hand, that night, one of the gods, curious, or perhaps careless, or perhaps driven from the hall and angry, threw down upon the ground his own great ax, and upon this ax he poured paga and his own blood, and the ax laughed and leaped up, and ran away. The god, and all the gods, could not catch it, and it became, it is said, the father of the men of Torvaldsland.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Pages 257 - 258


"I have heard," said Sarus, "that the chain of a slave girl are heaviest in Port Kar."
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 275


In Gorean thinking man and woman are natural animals, with genetic endowments shaped by thousands of generations of natural and sexual selection. Their actions and behavior, thus, though not independent of certain long-range environmental and sexual relationships, cannot be understood in terms of mere responses to the immediately present environment.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 311


But the Goreans have a saying, which came to me in the darkness, in the hall, "Do not ask the stones or the trees how to live; they cannot tell you; they do not have tongues; do not ask the wise man how to live, for, if he knows, he will know he cannot tell you; if you would learn how to live, do not ask the question; its answer is not in the question but in the answer, which is not in words; do not ask how to live, but, instead, proceed to do so."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 9


In the codes of the warriors, there is a saying, "Be strong, and do as you will. The swords of others will set your limits."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 10


The dead need no anointing. Only the living, it is held, can profane the sacred.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 37


Then she returned to her bailing.
. . .
She had performed her first task for her master, the Forkbeard, drying, as it is said, the belly of his serpent.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 63


"Thorgard is quite proud of his great longship," he said, "the serpent called Black Sleen."

I had heard of the ship.

"It has a much higher freeboard area than this vessel," I told Ivar Forkbeard. "It is a warship, not a raider. In any engagement you would be at a disadvantage."

The Forkbeard nodded.

"It is said, too," said I, "to be the swiftest ship in the north."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 71


"Is it only a bond-maid, my Jarl," asked Thyri, "who can know these pleasures?"
"It is said," I said, "that only a bond-maid can know them."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 106


Any woman, it is said, with pierced ears, is a slave girl.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 113


"It is said," intoned Ottar, "that Hilda the Haughty daughter of Thorgard of Scagnar, is the coldest of women."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 130


"My Jarl," she asked, frightened, "is it the second taking of the Gorean master, to which you intend to subject me?"

"Yes," I told her.

"I have heard of it," she wept. "In it," she gasped, "the girl is permitted no quarter, no mercy!"
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 137


The Forkbeard had bought with him, too, some bond-maids. They followed us. Their eyes were bright; their steps were eager; they had been long isolated on the farm; rural slave girls, the Forkbeard's wenches, they were fantastically stimulated to see the crowds; they looked upon the thing-fields with pleasure and excitement; even had they been permitted, some of them, to look upon certain of the contests. It is said that such pleasures improve a female slave.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 143


No female is regarded as competent to judge a female's beauty; only a man, it is said, can do that.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 153


"No woman," it is said, "knows truly what she is until she has worn the collar."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 155


"In the legends, it is said that Torvald sleeps in the mountain," smiled Ivar Forkbeard, "to awaken when, once more, he is needed in Torvaldsland."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 180


no master, it is said, who has not denied his girl food knows her;
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 48


"Only in a collar can a woman be truly free," I said. It was a Gorean saying.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 75


"More real than the law is the heart," said the girl, quoting a proverb of the Tahari.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 146


Had Ba'Arub destroyed or fouled the public wells at Red Rock, those outside the walls of the kasbah, Hammaran would have been forced to retire in twenty-four hours, and perhaps lose most of his men on the return march to his country. But, being of the Tahari, Ba'Arub, as it is told in the stories, related about the campfires, would not do this. It is said he came within ten yards of Hammaran.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 176


A good fight, I have heard men of the Tahari say, licking their lips, justifies any cause.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 177


To be a salt slave, it is said, one must be strong. Only the strong, it is said, reach Klima.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 220


"The desert is my mother, and my father," said Hassan. It was a saying of the Tahari.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 264


On Gor it is said that only a true slave begs to be freed.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 350


Soon I smelled the frying of vulo eggs in a large, flat pan, and the unmistakable odor of coffee, or as the Goreans express it, black wine.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 73


I was an ignorant, clumsy, frightened girl, raw, uncooked "collar meat," as it is said.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 103


He who can bend the longbow, a peasant saying has it, cannot be slave.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 112


Only a Ubar, it is said, may sit upon the throne of a Ubar.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 114


It is said, in a Gorean proverb, that a man, in his heart, desires freedom, and that a woman, in her belly, yearns for love.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 180


"It is said," said the one, "she has been given to Thurnus."
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 189


in the Gorean world, it is not uncommon to call in a trainer and beautician to appraise and improve a girl.
. . .
They are said to be able to work wonders. They are often employed in slave pens. A common challenge to them is to take an apparently plain free woman, recently enslaved, and transform her into a ravishing, imbonded beauty.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 216


Yet every part of a female body is beautiful to a Gorean, a hand, a wrist, an ankle, the back of a knee, the turn of a thigh, the sweet, soft hair, almost invisible and delicate, below and behind the ear. Each part bespeaks the glory and wonder and promise of the whole. I have heard Gorean men cry out with joy at the sight of a woman.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 236


"It is not yet time to serve the wine," I whispered. This is a common Gorean idiom. I was reminding him, timidly, that the time of general pleasure had not yet arrived.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 265


"You fear the persuasions of the morrow?" inquired Borchoff.

"No," said the prisoner, "but there is a time and a place for speaking, as there is a time and a place for steel."

"It is a saying of the warriors," said Borchoff.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 269


Many masters think it desirable to keep a girl illiterate in their language, thinking it makes them easier to control and puts them more at their mercy. Other masters differ in this, relishing the ownership and absolute domination of literate girls, preferably those who are well educated, highly intelligent and gifted. Such girls must be regarded as quite valuable; on the block they commonly bring the highest prices. It is also said they make the best slaves.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 277


The tarnsman, circling about, took mercy upon her and it is said she cried out with joy as his braided leather rope dropped about her and tightened on her body, jerking her, its prisoner, from the high bridge.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 332


"I have heard Dinas are good," he said.
"We are fabulous, Master!" I laughed. "We are Slave Flowers."
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 357


I have heard, the man, in the fullness of his heat, often laughs at the woman's illusion of freedom and seizes her to him as a slave;
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 361


"Sul paga!" demanded Thurnus. Sul paga, as anyone knew, is seldom available outside of a peasant village, where it is brewed. Sul paga would slow a tharlarion. To stay on your feet after a mouthful of Sul paga it is said one must be of the peasants, and then for several generations. And even then, it is said, it is difficult to manage. There is a joke about the baby of a peasant father being born drank nine months later.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 414


Many girls dream of being sold in the Curulean. Its great block is perhaps the most famous in Ar. It is also the largest. It is semi-circular and some forty feet in width. It is painted for the most part in blue and yellow, the colors of the slavers, and ornately carved, with many intricate patterns and projections. It is perhaps fifteen feet high. An interesting feature of the block is that about it, on the semi-circular side facing the crowd, tall and serene, carved in white-painted wood, evenly spaced, are the figures of nine slave girls. They represent, supposedly, the first nine girls taken, thousands of years ago, by the men of a small village, called Ar. In the carving it may be seen that the throats of the girls are encircled by ropelike collars, presumably woven of some vegetable substance. It is said that at that time the men of Ar were not familiar with the working of iron. It is also said the girls were forced to breed mighty sons for their captors.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 428


Sometimes special sales, well-publicized, are held, in which as few as fifteen or twenty girls, of great quality or interest, are sold. All Ar, it is said, tries to fill the house upon such occasions.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 431 - 432


I had looked into the blood, cupped in my hands. It is said that if one sees oneself black and wasted in the blood, one will perish of disease; if one sees oneself torn and bloody, one will perish in battle; if one sees oneself old and gray one will die in peace and leave children.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 14


One of the most harsh and cruel slaveries on Gor, it is said, is that of the slave girls of Tharna.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 46


It is said that only a fool would buy a clothed woman.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 64


"In Torvaldsland," I said, "it is said the woman of Kassau make superb slaves." I looked at her. "Is it true?" I asked.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 120


She, I had conjectured, would be the first of the three girls to come to a full slavery, or, as the Goreans sometimes put it, she would probably be the first to lick her chains.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 221


Songs, even simple ones, are regarded by the red hunters as being precious and rather mysterious. They are pleased that there are songs. As it is said, "No one knows from where songs come."
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 263


The training of the assassin is thorough and cruel. He who wears the black of that caste has not won it easily. Candidates for the caste are chosen with great care, and only one in ten, it is said, completes the course of instruction to the satisfaction of the caste masters.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 358


"But you are of the Assassins," I said.
"We are tenacious fellows," he smiled.
"I have heard that," I said.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Pages 412 - 413


"He is Karjuk, Master," she whispered, "once of Bright Stones Camp, who became the guard."
"It is said he left the camps and became the guard," said Imnak, "because his gifts were once refused by a proud girl of the Copper Cliffs Camp."
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Pages 425 - 426


It is said that he whose lips have never touched those of a slave girl does not know, truly, what it is to hold a woman in his arms.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 438


"It is said the women of Kassau make excellent slaves," I said.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 439


It is said that a woman who has experienced slave orgasm can never thereafter be anything but a man's slave.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 13


According to the tide tables the first tide would be full at six Ehn past the seventh Ahn.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 53


It is said that the ear piercing of slaves, on Gor, originated in Turia.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 96


"I am Kipofu," he said.
"It is said," I said, "that though you are blind there is little which you do not see in Schendi."
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 138


"Only one can sit upon the throne," said Msaliti.
"That is a saying in the north," I said.
"I know," said Msaliti. "But it is a saying that is also known east of Schendi."
"He who sits upon the throne, it is said," said Msaliti, "is the most alone of men."
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 237


Only one can sit upon the throne, as it is said. And, as it is said, he who sits upon the throne is the most alone of men.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 243


"Beggars speak to beggars, and to Ubars," I said.
"It is a saying of Schendi," he said.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 257


"It is said," I said, "That the women of Earth are natural slaves."
"It is true," she whispered.
"It is also said they are the lowest and most miserable of slaves, and are to be used as such."
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 291


"I have heard," she said, "that girls are often chained at night to slave rings at the foot of their masters' couches."
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 351


Sometimes, in the fall of a city, girls who have been enslaved, girls formerly of the now victorious city, will be freed. Technically, according to Merchant Law, which serves as the arbiter in such intermunicipal matters, the girls become briefly the property of their rescuers, else how could they be freed? Further, according to Merchant Law, the rescuer has no obligation to free the girl. In having been enslaved she has lost all claim to her former Home Stone. She has become an animal.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Pages 409 - 410


As the Goreans have it, such women are too beautiful to be free.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 410


There is a saying in Gorean, that the chains of a slave girl are heaviest in Port Kar.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 458


I would later learn that this was, in cursive script, the initial letter of the Gorean expression 'Kajira', which is the most common Gorean expression for a female slave. The design also, according to some, is supposed to have symbolic significance.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 68


The welfare of a larger number of individuals, as the Goreans reason, correctly or incorrectly, is more important than the welfare of a smaller number of individuals.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 210


It is said on Gor that only slaves, outlaws and Priest-Kings, rumored to be the rulers of Gor, reputed to live in the remote Sardar Mountains, are without caste.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 210


Slaves are commonly kept illiterate. It makes them more helpless. It gives the masters more control over them. Besides, it is said, why should a slave know how to read?
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 249


Who would wish to risk his life, it is said, to carry off a woman who might, when roped to a tree and stripped, turn out to be as ugly as a tharlarion?
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 42


Similarly it is said to be pleasant, if one has the time and patience, first to their horror and then to their joy, training them to the collar.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 42


"Yes, Master," she said. "I was here. I remember. He is Callimachus, of Port Cos."
"He was once of the warriors?" I asked.
"It is thought so," she said. "So it is said among the girls."
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 97


In ancient Attica it is said there was a giant, Procrustes. He would seize upon travelers and tie them upon an iron bed. If the traveler was too short for the bed, he would disjoint and break their bodies until they fitted it; if they were too long for the bed, he would cut their feet from them, until they, again, fitted the bed. Perhaps the bed of Procrustes is the truth and men must be broken or cut to pieces that they may fit it. On the other hand, clearly there is an alternative, although Procrustes seemed not to have heard of it. The bed could be made to fit the guest. Is the bed to conform to the guest, or is the guest to conform to the bed. From my own point of view, I would prefer a bed which considered the nature of human beings. I would make the human being the measure by which I judged the value of beds. I see little of profit in making the bed the measure of the human being, and requiring that we remake, if by torture and mutilation, the human being until it fits the bed. Besides, we cannot remake the human being to fit the bed, truly. We do not make new human beings or better human beings by this method. All we make by that method is broken or mutilated human beings.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 107


"I would like to know the business of Glyco with Callimachus," I said.

"I will tell you one thing I know," she said. "Glyco stays with the guardsmen of Port Cos, near the wharves."

"Not in an inn?" I asked.

"No," she said.

"Interesting," I said.

"And it is said, too," she whispered, coming close to me, the chain on her neck touching my chest, as she put her head over me, "that Glyco is not only a merchant but stands high in the merchant council of Port Cos."
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 163


"It is said," I said, "that the pirates own Victoria."
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 182


To beg to be purchased is a slave's act. That is a saying of Goreans.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 221


It interested me that Tasdron had, without even thinking about it, spoken of me as of Victoria. I, myself, had never given the matter much thought. I supposed that I was, though, in a sense, of Victoria. It was here, surely, that I was living and working. Yet to live and work in a place, and to be of a place, are, in Gorean thinking, quite different things. I wondered if I were of Victoria. I thought perhaps it was not impossible.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 261


It is said on Gor that the garments of a free woman are designed to conceal a woman's slavery, whereas the accouterments and garments of a slave, such as the brand and collar, the tunic or Ta-Teera, are made to reveal it.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 276


I looked over the starboard rail, and saw the great, curved shearing blade, fixed in the side of the vessel. Its mate, anchored, too, in the strakes, forward of the oars, reposed on the port side. These blades were seven feet in height, like convex moons of iron. It is said that such blades were an invention of Tersites, a shipwright of Port Kar.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 314


"The sword must drink until its thirst is satisfied," said Callimachus. It was a Gorean proverb.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 17


"The Voskjard has been delayed," said one of the men. "It is said he is not a patient man."
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 20


"Beware the sleen that seems to sleep," is a Gorean proverb.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 50


"Not directly," I said. "That would be transparent Kaissa, as it is said. Yet the enemy will expect us to dart for that opening."
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 80


She knows that she must be ready to serve, even on an instant's notice. This tends to keep her, as the Goreans say, rather vulgarly perhaps, "ready in her collar."
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 208


She might spend years in low taverns, or as a carnival dancer, or even as a street dancer, for provocation and use, on her leash, before her skills develop to a point at which she is good enough, as it is said, "to be permitted to dance before a Ubar."
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 234


On the twenty-fifth of Se'Kara in Year One of the Sovereignty of the Council of Captains, the year 10,120 C.A., Contasta Ar, from the Founding of Ar, a sea battle took place in which the fleet of Port Kar defeated the fleets of Cos and Tyros. The monument, of course, commemorates this victory. The market forms itself about the monument. That year, incidentally, is also regarded as significant in the history of Port Kar because it was in that year that, as it is said, a Home Stone consented to reside within the city.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 60 - 61


"It is said that such barbarians, properly tamed and trained, make excellent slaves," said the young man.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 83


"Have you a bargain to keep?" I asked.
"Yes," he said, "and it is important that I keep it. It is important that I maintain my integrity with these people, that I speak, as it is said, with a straight tongue."
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 253


One day, I thought, perhaps, I might try chain-luck in the city of Ar. It is said there are some good-looking women there.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 48


The slave fires in her belly, as it is said, had now been lit.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 141


"Being a slave girl is very different from being a free woman," I said. "From a free woman a man expects little, or nothing. From a slave girl, on the other hand, he expects, as it is said, everything, and more."
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 165


"It is said that he feared Mahpiyasapa would take the red-haired woman away from him."
. . .
"It is said he shot at Mahpiyasapa, and then went hunting," said Akihoka.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 186


"It is said she was once the daughter of Marlenus of Ar," I was told. "Then, for dishonoring him, she was disowned."
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 306


"Now kneel before me," I said, "with your knees wide, with your wrists crossed behind you, touching, as though bound."

"Yes, Master," she said. She was then before me, in a posture of my dictation, and, as it is said, bound by my will.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 319


She still held her wrists crossed, touching, behind her. She was still bound, as it is said, by the master's will.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 320


(speaking of a tarn) It is said it can see an urt move across open ground at a distance of two pasangs.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 323


"It is said that Wakanglisapa prizes his feathers and is jealous of them, for they contain powerful medicine."
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 346


"To share the kettle of a friend," I said, "is to dine with a Ubar."
"That, too, is a Gorean saying, isn't it?" asked Pumpkin.
"Yes," I said.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 349


Similarly, the expression "red silk," in Gorean, tends to be used as a category in slaving, and also, outside the slaving context, as an expression in vulgar discourse, indicating that the woman is no longer a virgin, or, as the Goreans say, at least vulgarly of slaves, that her body has been opened by men.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 472


"It is said," he said, "that she who identifies with slaves wants the collar on her own neck."
"No!" I cried.
"It is only a saying," he said. "Another such saying is that she who identifies with slaves is a slave."
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 121


The Goreans have a saying, "There are only two kinds of women, slaves, and slaves."
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 137


No longer was I a virgin. I had now been opened, as the Goreans might say, for the uses of men.
it is said, is in her heart a slave.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 239


Musicians on Gor, that is, members of the caste of musicians, are seldom, if ever, enslaved. Their immunity from bondage, or practical immunity from bondage, is a matter of custom. There is a saying to the effect that he who makes music must, like the tarn and the Vosk gull, be free. This is a saying, however, which I suspect was invented by the caste of musicians, to protect itself from bondage.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Pages 297 - 298


Few free women, I suspect, would dare to dance the dances of Gor before strong men. If they did so, how long could they expect to remain free? Any woman who dares to appear so before men, and dance, it is said, is in her heart a slave.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 298


"It is said that you have the finest hunting sleen on Gor," said Eito.
"They are good hunters," said Hassan. "They have been bred for it."
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 305


Their sentence is almost invariably slavery. Interestingly, once branded and in the collar, and knowing themselves helpless and under suitable male discipline, it is said they become joyful and content.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 316


The Goreans have a theory that any man can teach a woman her collar, and perfectly.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 349


"I am curious to know," I said.
"Curiosity is not becoming in a Kajira," he said.
"Nonetheless," I said, "we are notoriously curious. Doubtless the saying would not otherwise have gained such wide currency."
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 443


Boots swallowed, hard. "I am not a stern, inflexible fellow," he said. "It is well known that I am resilient and supple, as well as complex, subtle and talented. That Boots is a broad-minded fellow, I have often heard it said. He is easy-going and tolerant, as it is said, and, indeed, perhaps sometimes too much so for his own good, as it is also said. Yes, that Boots is a good fellow, one always ready to listen to arguments, to consider carefully the claims of reason, as they say."
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 196


"Only fools free female slaves," said Boots. "Surely you are familiar with the saying."
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 199


Gorean is written, as it is said, as the ox plows. The first line is written left to right, the second, right to left, the third, left to right again, and so on.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 243


There is a saying on Gor, "No musician can be a stranger." This saying is sometimes, too, applied to members of the caste of players.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 294


She shuddered. She lowered her eyes. "It is said that there is in every woman that which I sense so fearfully, yet so longingly, in myself."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 8


It is said on Gor that any woman who bares her legs is a slave.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 69


Within the entrance to the Semnium was a marble-floored, lofty hall. Passageways and stairways led variously from this broad vestibule. The walls were adorned with mosaics, scenes generally of civic life, prominent among them scenes of public gatherings, conferences and processions. One depicted the laying of the first stone in Torcadino's walls, an act which presumably would have taken place more than seven hundred years ago, when, according to the legends, the first wall, only a dozen feet high, was built to encircle and protect a great, sprawling encampment at the joining of trade routes.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 141


There is a common myth, given their post in the city, that Taurentians are spoiled, and soft. This myth is false. They are elite troops, highly trained and devoted to their commanders.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 245 – 246


Without girders, frame steel and timber iron, as the Goreans say, wrought in the iron shops, such as are used in the towers, physics, even indexed to the Gorean gravity, is quick to impose its inexorable limits on heights.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 282


I relit the lamp with the lighter, or as the Goreans say "fire-maker," from my pouch.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 395


She had already been "opened for the uses of men," as it is said here.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 65


I had been told that "curiosity was not becoming in a kajira." On the other hand I suspected that the very existence of such a saying witnessed in its way the widespread nature of exactly such a charming feature, or weakness.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 122


Free women, incidentally, seldom, if ever, bare their shoulders. Doing so is almost like offering themselves for the collar. "If you would be stripped as a slave, then be a slave," it is said.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 157


The husk of the she-sleen, as it is said, can be torn away, never to grow again, leaving behind only the soft flesh of another slave.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 167


If a command needs to be repeated, as the saying goes, the girl needs to be punished.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 211


Slave silk, and certainly that sort which is commonly worn in page taverns and upon occasion in brothels, when the girls are permitted clothing there, is generally diaphanous. It leaves little doubt as to the beauty of the slave. Some girls claim they would rather be naked, claiming that such silk makes them "more naked than naked," but most girls, and I think, even those, too, who speak in such a. way, are grateful for even the wisp of gossamer shielding it provides against the imperious appraisals of masters, even though it must be pulled away or discarded instantly at a man's whim. Too, I think most girls know that they are very beautiful in such silk, and this, I suspect, is why they love it, and treasure it so. Free women, on Gor, it seems, are frightened even to look upon such material, apparently finding it scandalously offensive, or somehow profoundly disturbing to them, let alone let it touch their body. Some free women, captured, when such stuff is thrown to them, profess to prefer death to putting it on, but when this choice is that which is actually offered to them they put it on quickly enough. Too, such women, it is said, make excellent slaves.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 224 - 225


She would come to realize that, as the Goreans say, "slave fires had been lit in her belly."
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 241


Market of Semris is not a large town, and it is mostly famed, as I have earlier noted, for its markets for tarsks, "four-legged" and "two-legged," as it is said, but like most Gorean towns, its square, even as small as it was, was a matter of civic pride.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 281


Many of the finest tavern dancers, it is said, began on the back streets, on a leash.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 287


Many times these offers, which are usually generous, are accepted, with the result that the amount of area under cultivation by the great farms tends to increase. Sometimes, it is said, that cruel and unfair pressure is applied to farmers, or villages, such as threats, or the burning of crops, and such, but I would think that this would surely be the exception rather than the rule.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 303


"Wine, Master?" is a common expression. In it the slave usually offers the master not only drink, say, the wine in the cup, but also, implicitly, the wine of her love, body and beauty.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 325


In Gorean mythology it is said that there was once a war between men and women and that the women lost, and that the Priest-Kings, not wishing the women to be killed, made them beautiful, but as the price of this gift decreed that they, and their daughters, to the end of time, would be the slaves of men.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 352


Indeed, it is said some of the finest and most sensuous dancers are private slaves who perform in delicious secrecy, and totally, for a single master.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 357


Further, it is said that the slavery of a woman in Tharna is one of the strictest, most uncompromising and complete of slaveries on Gor.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 385


Surprisingly, however, and scarcely to be expected in such a stern polity, the city itself is ruled by a Tatrix. Her name, it is said, is Lara. Also, paradoxically, Tharna's first minister, who stands second only to the Tatrix, is not of high caste but of lowly origin, only of the metal workers. His name, it is said, is Kron. Such things, I think, make Tharna an unusual city. She defends herself well, incidentally, and some, though perhaps they jest, speculate that her silver may be safer even than that of Argentum, which is an ally of Ar. One man of Tharna, it is said, is a match for ten from most cities.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 385


Most Goreans, incidentally, do not attribute lightning and thunder to the grinding of the flour of Priest-Kings. They regard such things as charming myths, which they have now outgrown.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 18


There is even the legend of the tarntauros, or creature half man, and half tarn, which in Gorean myth, plays a similar, one might even say, equivalent, role to that of the centaur in the myths of Earth. Too, the tarnsman retains something of the glamour which on Earth attached to the horseman, particularly so as the technology laws of the Priest-Kings, remote, mysterious masters of Gor, preclude the mechanization of transportation.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Pages 138 - 139


"It is said the city will soon fall," I said.
"The defenses cannot be long maintained?" she asked.
"It is thought not," I said.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 149


"But then," I said, "it is said, I have heard, that those of Port Kar prize Cosians as slaves."
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 175


"I have heard that bondage is difficult to conceal," said Lady Claudia.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 273


"It is said the Cosians did much butchery in the city."
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 309


Warriors, it is said in the codes, have a common Home Stone. Its name is battle.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 343


"It is said," said Aemilianus, "as Calliodorus has told me, that even a whisper in Ar is heard in Telnus by nightfall."
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 420


All, I think it is fair to say, are itching for the touch of masters."
"'Itching'?" I asked, amused.
"A slave's expression," she smiled.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 14


"Surely there must have been repercussions concerning the dispatches and such," I ventured.

"They were not important, it seems, but routine. It is said they were not even coded. Too, his bravery, his skill with tarns and the sword, and such, were valued. To be sure, he was fined and reduced in rank. His monetary fortunes, I gather, if not his dignity, have been apparently recouped, presumably from loot distributed to the command of Artemidorus, acquired in the fall of Ar's Station."
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Pages 24 - 25


She was short-legged and plump, juicy, as it is said, with a marvelous love cradle. Such often make superb slaves. They commonly bring high prices in the markets.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 31


It is said that the chains of a slave girl are heaviest in Port Kar.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 193


With the unification of the Wagon Peoples under a Ubar San, Kamchak, of the Tuchuks, it is my impression that the riders of the swift kaiila now seldom ply their depredations against their own kind. Rather do they roam afield. It is said not a woman is safe within a thousand pasangs of the wagons.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 272


To be sure, once the slave has learned her condition, or learned her collar, as the Goreans say, she has no doubt whatsoever of this dominance, and her subjection to it.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 321


The saying "Modesty is not permitted to slave girls," is a saying then which is usually reserved for particular occasions, as, for example, if a girl might exhibit distress at being stripped for her sale, or, say, be tempted to balk at performing floor movements naked for business acquaintances of her master.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 324


"It is said that five women there wear the disk of Tamrun."
"He must be quite a man," I said.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Pages 351 - 352


I did not think he would mind if I "shared his kettle," as some of the Goreans say.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 372


She was well made up, with lipstick, eye shadow, and such, a painted slave, as it is said.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 400


On Gor it is said that free women are slaves who have not yet been collared.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 22


Given the anger in Ar at Ar's Station, and the fact that the Home Stone of Ar's Station had been sent to Ar, supposedly, according to the rumors, not for safekeeping, given the imminent danger in the city, but in a gesture of defiance and repudiation, attendant upon the supposed acceptance of a new Home Stone, one bestowed upon them by Cosians, the stone was, during certain hours, publicly displayed.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 24


How lofty, I thought, are the walls of Ar. Yet they were only of stone and mortar. They could be breached. Her bridges could be, as the Goreans have it, washed in blood.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 38


"Noble Talena!" cried another.

"It is absurd," said another fellow. "She is not the daughter of Marlenus. She was disowned by him."

"And thus," I said, "her offer is of no more import than would be the similar offer of any other free woman of Ar."

"Treason!" said a fellow.

"It is said," said a fellow, "that she has been a slave."
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 72


"It is said that even numbers of the High Council, as a token, have come to the wall, loosened a stone, and tumbled it down."
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 119


"It all depends on the fellow involved," he said. "If you were to attempt to accomplish this, with your particular subtlety and skills, there would indeed be danger, perhaps unparalleled peril. Indeed, I think I would have the rack prepared the night before. But for me, I assure you, it is nothing, no more than a sneeze."
. . . "Do you not remember what he said in his insula," I asked
Marcus, "that it was nothing, that it would be no more than a sneeze?"
"Yes," said Marcus. That is a Gorean expression, incidentally, that something would be no more than a sneeze.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Pages 287 & 404


"‘Do you know that he dedicated the first performance of his "Lurius of Jad" to me?' she asked."
‘Yes, Mistress,' I responded.
‘It is said to have been his finest performance,' she said, the she-sleen!"
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 363


Perhaps they could even arrange for the purchase of one of them, not to free her, of course, for it is said that only a fool frees a slave girl, but to take her home and keep her for themselves.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 378


Indeed, it is said, though I do not know with what truth, that Pentilicus Tallux, for whom the great theater is named, first inscribed his poetry on walls.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 378


"Do you not remember what he said in his insula," I asked Marcus, "that it was nothing, that it would be no more than a sneeze?"
"Yes," said Marcus. That is a Gorean expression, incidentally, that something would be no more than a sneeze.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Pages 404 - 405


"Curiosity is not becoming in a kajirus," I said.
"Yes, Master," he said. This was a play, of course, on the common Gorean saying that curiosity is not becoming in a female slave, or kajira.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 436


Those who control the public boards, it is said, control the city.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 488


"It is said," he remarked, "that one such as you might be hot."
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 62


We were all pierced-ear girls, as it is said.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 72


A saying, a saying of men, of course, has it that all women are slaves, only that some are not yet in the collar.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 102


Too, my curiosity had been evident, and curiosity, it is said, is not becoming in such as we.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 118


On this world I had not been permitted footwear. It is said that it need not be wasted on animals.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 123


A tasta is a kind of small, sweet candy, usually sold at fairs. It is commonly mounted on a stick. Some men use it as a slang expression for one such as I.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 148


It is said that only a fool would buy a woman clothed.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 156


At that time I did not know of the habit of some masters, usually imposed as punishment, to refuse an upright posture to their girls, and to refuse them, as well, the use of human language. They must go about on all fours, or their bellies, and communicate, as they can, by whimpers, moans, and such. They are naked, save for their collars. They are not permitted to use their hands to feed themselves, and so on. Needless to say, they also serve in this modality. There are various Gorean expressions for this; one is the "discipline of the she-tarsk."
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 173


"Her brand is still smoking," laughed another. It was a saying.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 202


It is said that only a fool frees a slave girl. It is true.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 212


One might even have said, as one had, as the saying has it, that my brand was still smoking.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 213


Priest-Kings, for example, whoever they may be, have no caste. They are said to be "above caste."
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 226


The men on this world relish intelligent women. We make, it is said, the best slaves.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 272


It is said that sometimes slavers enter the boudoir of a free woman and scrutinize her in her sleep, in this considering what value, if any, she might hold as a slave.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 309


What free woman would dare to appear, as it is said, "slave desirable"?
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 321


Still he put his finger under her collar, and, as she gasped, he pulled her even closer to him, indeed, quite close to him, "slave close," as the expression is.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 358


One night, of course, merely be told that curiosity is not becoming in a kajira, which, I had learned, is something of a saying on this world, but, more likely, one might be cuffed or beaten, and then one might have one's hands bound behind one and one's question written on, say, the interior of one's thigh or on a breast, usually the left, as most masters are right handed, where when one returns to one's keeper or master, it will be clear that one has been disobedient, and attempted to obtain the denied information illicitly.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Pages 361 - 362


"There is a saying," she said. "It is that there are two sorts of female slaves, those who are collared, and those who are not yet collared."
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 369


Indeed, it is said that a skilled slaver can tell the difference between a free woman in the robes of concealment and a slave in them merely by having them walk about.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 394


Whatever be the case here, it is a mater of fact that "slave strikes" more frequently target slaves than free woman.

I know this now, but did not realize it at the time. Indeed, I was shortly to be apprised of an exception to this rule, though, at the time, I did not understand that it was an exception.

And, in its way, I suppose the exception, as it is said, "proved the rule." In any event, in contrast to the rule, its anomalous character drew a great deal of attention to the very rule it violated.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 408


Curiosity, it is said, is not becoming in kajirae.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 415


It is said that none may pass unauthorized the lines of interdiction, and that, of those who do, none are to return.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 417


In Gorean there is an expression which would rather literally translate as "display slave," and it seems that that is much the same idea, namely, that the woman's value is seen to lie more in the ranges of a decoration, an appointment, an appurtenance, or such things, than in herself, than in the heats, services, devotions, and loves of a whole woman, a living, breathing, loving, passionate, needful female.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 583


"Honor," I said, "has many voices, and many songs."

He looked down at me startled. "That is a saying of warriors," he said. "It is from the codes. It is a long time since I have heard it. I had almost forgotten it. Where did you, a slave, hear it?"

"In Treve," I said.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 711


The saying is given more fully, commonly, as "open for the uses of men."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 136


She then felt her body, her hair in his grip, his left hand on her left knee, bent backward, until she was helpless before him; the "slave bow," as the expression is, of her vulnerable, owned beauty thusly exhibited for his attention, or assessment.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 141


On the other hand, it is said that beneath all the clothing, the veils, the Robes of Concealment, and such, of a free woman there is still, after all, only the body of a naked slave."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 154


It is said those of Treve know well how to handle women."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 158


But it is said that even in such women there eventually comes a moment in their bondage when the emotional cataclysm occurs, when the breakthrough takes place, when the depths of the unconscious open up, when the surgent, rising earthquake of the liberated spirit totters and collapses the fragile, brittle walls of their psychological prisons, when the moment of truth blazes before them like sunrise, and shuddering and sobbing with gratitude and misery they understand themselves for the first time in their lives, understand that they are women, and belong to men, men who will see to it that they fulfill their natures.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 189


"Perhaps you rushed to your ideology in order to hide your deepest feelings and needs from yourself, the ideology constituting in its way a defense mechanism, as the expression is, a hysterical denial of inwardly sensed biotruths."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 201


She had been, as the saying was, opened for the uses of men.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 219


She recalled a saying she had heard in the house, that beneath the clothes of every woman there is to be found the body of a naked slave.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 222


As the saying is, if one wants a man to be more of a man one should be more of a woman.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 232


"It is said that Myron, Polemarkos of Temos, has entered the city," said Fel Doron.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 325


In a sales coffle two policies tend to predominate: sometimes the most beautiful are saved for the end, which has led to the saying "rich enough to buy from the end of the chain,"
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 350


She recalled the saying that curiosity was not becoming in a slave girl, a saying which had always seemed ironic to her, because, to the best of her knowledge, amongst such eager, bright, lively creatures, an avid curiosity was endemic.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 354


Elsewhere she supposed that the stream was not more than three or four feet deep, or, as the Goreans would have it, who tended to think of water from the bottom up, three or four feet high.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 382


It is a common belief on Gor that all free females desire in their secret hearts to be the slaves of masters; there is a saying, in every free female there lurks a slave, a slave awaiting her liberation, her freedom, her collar.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 395


"It is said," said Feike, smiling, "that no barbarian knows how to please a man."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 434


Then she rose to her feet and put her veil about her head, wrapping it closely about her head and shoulders, concealing even her face. It was much as though she might be a free woman, though surely the bells on her ankle and her silks belied that possibility. She then walked about the dancing area, erect, proudly, gracefully, but keeping herself concealed.
To be sure, her feet were bare, and there were bells on her left ankle. This created, to the Gorean thinking, a paradox.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 439


The more intelligent she is, of course, the better slave she is likely to make; I assume that that is obvious; she is likely to be more aware of the subtlest and almost unspoken desires of her master; she is less likely to make errors which might displease him; and she is likely to be not only hot, devoted and dutiful, as the saying is, but inventive and zealous, conscientious and creative, intelligently desperate to please, in her unrelieved, categorical servitude.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 451


In Gorean there is even an expression "slave desirable," which means, of course, desirable enough even to be a female slave.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 483


Perhaps, on the other hand, she is, subconsciously presumably, as the saying is, "courting the collar."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 495


Thus, if the women are slaves, they will have them so clad, "slave clad," as the expression is.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 536


I have heard that there is a saying amongst one of the many Gorean peoples, in this case the "Red Savages of the Barrens," as they are spoken of, to the effect that an enemy afoot is an enemy dead.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 584


He decided, it is said, to keep her for himself.
It is said she became one of the loveliest house and stable slaves in Venna, a city somewhat north of Ar, famed for its tharlarion races.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 590


"Masters!" said Ellen. "It may be I whom they want. That is possible! It is said Tersius Major is with them! He may want me!
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 599


It is said that once one has tasted a slave, one finds it difficult to think again in terms of free women.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 625


Ellen then realized that she might be extremely desirable, perhaps even, as it is said, "slave desirable."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 626


The sleen, it is said, is the ideal mercenary.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 643


There is a saying that curiosity is not becoming in a kajira, and yet how well the masters understand our incessant and insatiable curiosity! But sometimes I think my master keeps much from me not simply because he enjoys keeping me, tormentingly, appropriately, as Goreans see it, in "slave ignorance," but for my safety, as well.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 710


The nature of the Priest-Kings seems to be obscure. It is said by some that they are without form.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 7


In the north of Gor, in its polar regions, inhabited sparsely by tribes of humans known as the Red Hunters, recognizable by the small blue spot at the base of their spine, it is said that he, this Tarl Cabot, once encountered a great war general of the Kurii, Zarendargar, whose name, for convenience, we have transliterated into phonemes hopefully accessible to at least some readers of this tale, certainly in this translation.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 18 - 19


Or perhaps it is their way of, as it is said, "courting the collar."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 55


Slave fires, as the expression is, are cruelly and mercilessly lit within the bellies of female slaves.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 167


The gates of many cities have been unlocked with a key of silver," smiled Peisistratus.

This is, one gathers, a saying. Its origin is obscure. It may be from the "Field Diaries," an anonymous Gorean publication, often attributed to Carl Commenius, he of Argentum. It has also been attributed to Dietrich of Tarnburg, Lurius of Jad, and even, interestingly, to Marlenus of Ar. One suspects that its actual origin is lost. It, or its variations, might emerge, naturally enough, one supposes, from reflection upon a variety of historical instances.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 294


"The Goreans have a saying," he said, "that all women are indeed slaves, only that some are in collars and some are not."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 312


Only a fool, it is said, would buy a woman clothed.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 334


"The arrow is swifter," said Cabot. "It is not for nothing the arrow is sometimes spoken of as the bird of death. In Torvaldsland, the arrow is sometimes spoken of as the jard feeder."

This reference seems obscure, but the jard is a Gorean bird, a small, black, flocking bird, a scavenger. Its gatherings, sometimes before battles, or in the vicinity of lengthy, desperate marches, are often regarded with uneasiness, and some see it as a bird of ill omen. A saying in the Gorean north, seemingly related, is to speak of a defeated force as having been given over to the feasting of jards.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 376 - 377


Indeed, it may have been a bit shorter than even that of the slave, which was already scandalously brief, or, as the saying is, "slave short," and, in addition, its light fabric, unshaped and loose on her body, was split at both hips, to the waist.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 446 - 447


"The massacre, it is said, took place in the Vale of Destruction," said Peisistratus.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 531


"Zarendargar," said a Kur.
"It is said he asked for you," said a Kur.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 602


It is said that some can take a pot girl, a kettle-and-mat girl, a mill girl, a laundress, or such, and return a needful dream of a pleasure slave.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 610


Four days later, Peisistratus, with several of his men, arrived, together with some of their slaves, for Gorean men are fond of slaves, and seldom wish to do without their services and pleasures. This is easily understood, as I understand it, by any human male who has, as the saying is, "partaken of collar meat." Once a fellow has, as it is said, "tasted slave," it seems he is content thereafter with nothing less.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 652 - 653


It is said that no woman knows how beautiful she is until she has seen herself in a collar.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 702


"I have heard that Goreans believe all women should be slaves," she said.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 16


"In the cupboards of Port Kar, it is said, one is as likely to find gold as bread." It was a saying.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 35


Many of these women, of course, on the other hand, are distributed as gifts by the captains or, more likely, retailed locally, for example sold to various local taverns. The women are usually of high quality or they would not be taken. When they are stripped, if ashore, before embarking, before returning to port, it is determined whether or not they are, as the saying is, "slave beautiful."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 35 - 36


Too, in the codes there is a saying that he who strikes first lives to strike second.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 37


Too, it is not unknown for such tarns to revert, so to speak. I think no tarn is that far from the wild. In their blood, it is said, are the wind and the sky.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 53


In his own hut, if it has a Home Stone, it is said that even a beggar is a Ubar.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 54


Long ago, in Turia, it is said that a free woman, armed with a dagger, disguised as a slave, attempted to assassinate a Ubar in his cups.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 59


I had punished the Earth girl well for her indiscretion. She was now, as the saying is, more familiar with her collar. Now, the very thought of attempting to escape, or of even failing to be pleasing, and fully so, would fill her with terror.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 104 - 105


Gorean slaves were seldom freed. Indeed, there is a saying that only a fool frees a slave girl.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 113


"It is only a matter of time," said a fellow, "until she is thrown, naked and in chains, to the tiles at the foot of the Ubar's throne."
"Woe to Talena," said a fellow.
"She is a traitress to her Home Stone," said a man.
"True," said the fellow. "Let it then be done to her according to the ways of Gor."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 120


Many free women, incidentally, have never seen a slave in "position," though they may, to their disgust, or delight and envy, have heard the attitude described.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 122


She has been, as it is said, "spoiled for freedom."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 125


Wonders, it is said, may be wrought in such women by a switch, and a master's hand.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 137


Earth-girl names commonly serve as slave names on Gor. That is perhaps because Goreans think of Earth girls as being of slave stock, of superb slave stock. Indeed, some Goreans look for them in the markets, and it is said they are seldom disappointed.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 176


There is no training, as it is said, which can compare with the dojo of blood.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 282


"He is ronen," said Tajima. "A fellow of the waves, as it is said, one with no home, one carried by the current, one with no master, no captain. There are many such."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 288


There is a saying that a man conquers with the sword, the slave with a kiss.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 317


Such women, it might be mentioned, in passing, once enslaved, are irremediably slaves. They are rejected as free females not only by their former compatriots, with whom they once shared a Home Stone, but by their families, as well. Once collared, as the saying is, always a slave.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 323


It is said that there is only one thing more miserable than a master without a slave, and that is a slave without a master.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 363


It is said that in the kingdom of the blind the one-eyed man is king. So, too, it might be said that in the kingdom of the addled and staggering, he is king who is sober, swift, and purposeful.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 413


Curiosity, it is said, is not becoming in a kajira.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 431


There is a saying among warriors that he who attacks a shadow plays with death.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 434


To shorten the story, great Marlenus was recognized, it is said by a slave, in a line of Peasants, delivering suls within the city.
. . .
In their care, days later, it is said that suddenly the long-suppressed memory of great Marlenus again came alive, in a howl of understanding and rage.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 15


The tarn, it is said, is the Ubar of the sky.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 28


"The laws of Cos," I said, "march with the spears of Cos."
"That is a saying, is it not?" asked Lord Nishida.
"Yes," I said.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 97


Is it not a saying of warriors that one does not sell one's blade, that steel is to be prized above gold? And honor above life?
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 101


"I have heard," I said, "that barbarians are good."
"Any woman is good," said Cabot, "once she is broken to the collar."
Again I thought of Alcinoë. How pleasant it might be, she now a slave, to break her to the collar, to have crawling to my feet, begging a caress.
"Barbarians sell well," I said. I wondered what Alcinoë might bring.
"Few are left long on the chain," he granted me.
"It is said they lick the whip quickly," I said.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 117


As it is said, all women are slaves, only some are in collars, and some are not.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 128


As it is said, curiosity is not becoming in a kajira.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 206


Lord Nishida had two contract women, as the expression is, at his disposal, Sumomo and Hana.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 270


As it is said, the identity of a slave is given to her by the collar.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 274


A saying has it, bare the face, bare the woman. Another well-known saying is, remove the veil of a free woman and look upon the face of a slave.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Pages 341 - 342


Some of our bowmen climbed over bodies, and from the grisly height of such hills, formed of inert or bleeding men, plied their craft, playing, as it is said, tunes on the lyre of death.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 357


When Tereus withdrew, storming away, in compliance with the instructions of the deck watch, it is said the eyes of Rutilius, glistening, followed him, and that he smiled, and then turned about, and hobbled away, poking at the deck with his makeshift crutch.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 361


Many free women, it is said, and perhaps all, as is hinted, are merely slaves who have dared to conceal themselves for a time in the habiliments of the free.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 373


"Many of the enemy, it is said," said a fellow, "are low Pani, impressed into service. The blast of a war horn should send them running back to their fields."
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 402


He who controls the rice, it is said, controls the islands.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 407


"It is said," said Philoctetes, "Tarl Cabot is on the grounds."
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 407


"Surely freedom is precious," I said.
"So, too," she said, "is bondage."
"I have heard so," I said.
"What woman does not wish to be owned," she said, "what woman does not wish a master?"
"Some, I suppose, free women, would deny it," I said.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 438


If I owned her, I thought, she would well know herself slave. Her collar, as it is said, would be well locked.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 440


One is reminded of the saying that a free woman is but a slave without a collar.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 480


Among their many services, for a sufficient fee, they assure success in business, politics, and love, which successes are unfailing, it is said, unless they not be in accord with the will of the Priest-Kings. On the docks, also for a sufficient fee, they sometimes sell fair winds and clear skies, which also never fail, it is said, save when not in accord with the will of the Priest-Kings.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 504


Swords, not words, rule cities, it is said.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 516


>"A slave," he said.

>"Yes, Master!" she laughed, and leaned forward, as she could, straining to reach him with her lips.

>"I am not a fool," he said.

>"No, Master!" she said.

>This was doubtless an allusion to the well-known proverb, that only a fool frees a slave girl.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Pages 527 - 528


"I could slip half of this into my purse," I said, "while you two are carrying on, as it is said, dizzy on the heights of desire, wandering on the roads of delight, lost in the forests of rapture, drunk on the wines of love, swimming about in one another's eyes, and such. Repulsive. Offensive!"
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 546


"I did not allow her to speak," said Callias.
I nodded. She had been then, as it is said, gagged by the master's will.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 562


On the other hand, the Goreans have an expression, "Slave beautiful," and that clearly means beautiful enough to be a slave.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 40


We are, as it is said, not permitted modesty, no more than a she-sleen or she-tarsk, but we will do much for a garment, however scanty.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 99


It is said the chains of a slave girl are heaviest in Port Kar.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 119


It is said that only a fool buys a woman clothed.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 129


Still, I have heard rumors that some free women dye their hair.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 136


But then I recalled the saying, that only a fool buys a woman clothed.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 139


The caste of Initiates, it is said, act as the intermediaries between Priest-Kings and men, appointing festivals, prophesying, uttering oracles, accepting offerings, selling blessings, performing sacrifices, and such.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 142


It is said that bondage makes a woman more beautiful, and I suspect that that is true.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 154


I assumed they would not have been freed. They were comely, and it is said that only a fool frees a slave girl.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 226


A Gorean saying, seldom heard in the presence of free women, has it that beneath the robes of every free woman there is a naked slave.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 231


"I see," I said. "I have heard that some men, for whatever reason, see a woman as their slave, as delicious, incomparable collar meat, special to them, and will not rest until she is chained at their feet."

"And I have heard," said he. "that some women, for whatever reason, look up at a fellow, from their knees, and recognize him as their master."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 349


She had perhaps been testing him, to see, as the saying is, how many links of chain were permitted to her, which is an unwise venture with a Gorean male.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 399


It is said the man conquers with a sword, the woman with a kiss.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 502


It is said there is a Third Knowledge but that is reserved to Priest-Kings.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 562


"It is said," said Nora, "that there is a conspiracy of men within the Cave to thwart the projects of the hirsute masters."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 587


There is a saying, of course, that only a fool frees a slave girl.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 647


Is the expression 'collar slut' not informative? I think so.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 29


But beyond the influx of refugees, more streaming in each day, the crowding, the begging, the closing of hiring tables, the raiding of garbage troughs, the sleeping in cold, damp dangerous streets, the discordant accounts of doings to the south and east, the racing about of rumors, it was clear that something different and unusual was occurring in Brundisium, something apart from refugees, apart from remote dislocations, apart from proscriptions and impaling spears, apart from tumult and flight, apart from red grass and bloodied stones, apart from hazard and vengeance, apart from political rearrangements, apart from exchanges of power wherein, as it is said, the "streets run with blood."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 39 - 40


If the Merchants are not a high caste, it is clear they are an important caste. It is said they own councils and sway law, that their gold hides and whispers behind thrones, that cities heed their words, that Ubars are often in their debt.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 64


It is said that curiosity is not becoming to a kajira.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 67


Did they not know that they were women, and in the presence of men? Perhaps, as the saying is, they were "courting the collar."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 80


In some places, farther south, there are women in the forest who do not belong to men. They are free women and hate us, for we belong to men. If they capture us they beat us and sell us. But if they are captured, it is said that they, too, quickly, learn they belong to men.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 89


It is said that a free woman might perish of shame if placed in a slave tunic, but, to a slave, such a garment, which she knows need not be accorded to her, may be a treasure, more precious to her than some assemblage of robes and veils to a free woman.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 95


Who, it is said, would wish to risk his life for a tarsk? On the other hand, there is little doubt that the capture of a free woman, given the care with which they are guarded, the glory of capturing one, and such, is usually considered an estimable coup.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 97


Except on a round ship and even on many of those, mariners do not welcome the presence of a free woman. Such, it is said, sow discord.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 106


"It is said you have been even to the pavilion of Lord Okimoto."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 130


"You stand high," I said. "It is said you have been admitted even to the pavilion of Lord Okimoto."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 131


"There is nothing at the World's End," I said, "only the currents, the storms, and the great cliff, over which ships will be swept, to plunge forever."

"Such things are said," he said, "but you do not believe them."
. . .

"Some," he said. "Have you heard of Tersites, of Port Kar?"

"I have heard of him," I said. "He disappeared, years ago. He was a shipwright, eccentric and unreliable, driven from Port Kar. It is said he is lame, half-blind, and mad. It is said he is at war with Thassa and would challenge her."

"It is his ship," said Tyrtaios, "and it is being built for, and outfitted for, a voyage to the World's End."

"From whence are the Pani?" I asked.

"I think," said he, "from the World's End."

"How came they here?" I asked.

"It is said," he said, "on the wings of Priest-Kings."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 146


On the other hand, many, it is said, "court the collar," and it seems to be the case that "free captures," in their hundreds or thousands, as in the wars, the raids of slavers, the seizures of caravans, the depredations of pirates, the fall of cities, and such, once collared, once owned, find fulfillments until then no more than suspected.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 172


"What is wrong with it?" asked the beast. "We are preparing it for you. You commonly cook your food, do you not? We prefer a live kill, with the fresh blood."

"I think," said Tyrtaios, "he would prefer that it be killed."

"It is said that cooking it alive improves the flavor," said the beast. "I have heard so."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 214


The garment was sleeveless, and came high on my thighs. Such tunics leave little to the imagination. The disrobing loop, for I now wore one, was at my left shoulder, where it would be convenient to the hand of a right-handed man. Such garment, too, of course, lack a nether closure. We are to be at the convenience of our masters. In such a tunic it is said that a woman is more naked than naked.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 231


It is said some larls can hear the squeal of a wounded animal from five pasangs away.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 300


I have heard that free women, if they have a serving slave, or slaves, often purchase pretty ones, ones of a sort they particularly hate, in this way denying such a slave a master, which gratifies the free woman, and denying a master the slave, which, I suppose gratifies her as well.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 312


"Are not barbarians frigid?" he asked.

"Not at all," I said. "Touch one, and see her squirm, and beg."

"I suppose it might be nice to have one or another in one's pleasure garden," he said.

"I suppose," I said, "but I have heard they also make nice private slaves, as well. It is said they are commonly devoted."

"One must beware of caring for a slave," he said.

"Of course," I said. How preposterous was such a notion!

"You seem to know something of barbarians," he said. "How is that possible?"

"I have heard things," I said.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 357


Whereas cities have laws, and most castes have caste codes, there is only one law which is generally respected, and held in common, amongst Gorean municipalities, and that is Merchant Law, largely established and codified at the great Sardar Fairs. According to Merchant law an unclaimed slave, one legally subject to claimancy, may be claimed, and then is the property of the claimant.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 424


It is said that there is no escape for the Gorean slave girl.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 439


"There is a man called Tersites," she said, "a master shipwright, he is supposedly determined."
"I think he is mad," I said.
"It is said he thinks of the World's End," she said.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 458


Curiosity, as it is said, is not becoming in a kajira.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 475


"Only a fool," said he, "frees a slave girl."
"That is a saying, is it not?" I said.
"Yes," he said.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 550


"In your camp," said Lord Okimoto, "it is said the men are well fed."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 20


"It is said," said Lord Nishida, "that a thousand posts surmounted by a thousand heads line the march of Yamada to the lands of Temmu."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 54


"And in the camp it is said that Tarl Cabot, tarnsman, has deserted the banner of Temmu, and that the tarn cavalry, what remained of it, is fled."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 76


There is a Gorean expression, "slave beautiful," or "beautiful enough to be a slave."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 79


"It is said that unless the house of Temmu yields to the house of Yamada the iron dragon will emerge from its den and destroy the house of Temmu."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 107


"The bones and shells do not lie," said Daichi, in a terrible voice, pointing to the objects in question.
"Perhaps," I said, "those who read them might - be mistaken."
"It is said," said Lord Temmu, "that they are sometimes hard to understand."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 123


Secrets are seldom entrusted to slaves. As it is said, the babbling of slaves is like the babbling of brooks. Who knows who will stray by the brook and at what time?
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 213


Tyrtaios, who, I feared, possessed the subtlety, training, and weaponry of the darkest of castes. I knew the black dagger was not easily attained; it is won in but one way, the ascent, as it is said, of the nine steps of blood.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 295


I was reminded of a saying I had heard long ago. "The laws of Cos march with the spears of Cos."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 351


"On continental Gor," I said, "the Peasants is a proud caste. It is the ox on which the Home Stone rests."
"That is a saying?" said Haruki.
"A very old saying," I said.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 376


"A beggar," he said, "a mountebank, a gambler, a madman, who will wager his head against a bowl of rice."
"And thus he earns his rice?" asked Pertinax.
"It is said, one bowl a day," said Haruki.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 449


"Even amongst the higher orders," said Nodachi, "it is said that some eat the rice of slaves."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 536


Too, only a fool frees a slave girl. Surely you know the saying.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 628


"It is said that only a fool frees a slave girl," she said.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 30


I had been silenced, as it is said, by the master's will.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 222


"The animals, the beasts," I said, "how fearsome they are, such terrible things."
"It is said," said Kurik, "that one, unarmed, could kill a sleen."
I shuddered.
"But it is said, as well," said Kurik, "that one would be no match for a larl."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 316


Toward the fifteenth Ahn our wagon had drawn into the large caravanserai of Hogarth, thirty pasangs from Ar, by the pasang stone, and, already, better than a hundred wagons were housed there. By the eighteenth Ahn there must have been more than four hundred. It is said that during the holidays, particularly those associated with the vernal equinox, at which point Goreans begin their year, as many as a thousand wagons might be quartered in the "Hogarth fields," which includes the compass of the caravanserai proper and, beyond that, an extensive over-flow area.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 613


A saying I have heard seems germane here, "the laws of Cos march with the spears of Cos."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 233


The Goreans have a saying, "Let those who fear the high bridges not walk them."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 496


"You are familiar with the saying, I take it," said Kurik, "that many a track leads into the den of the larl but few lead out."
"Yes," said Lord Grendel, "but let me add to the saying, that those tracks that lead out may be awash with the blood of the larl."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 523


"Only a fool frees a slave girl," I smiled. It was a Gorean saying. What rational man, fortunate enough to own a desirable woman, would let her out of his collar?
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 667






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