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Passage Hand
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Year 10,170 Contasta Ar


Musical Instruments



This is my short narrative and relevant references from the Books where Musical Instruments are mentioned.
It is not meant to be anything other than the facts of the matter.
Arrive at your own conclusions.

I wish you well,
Fogaban


Tarl says he has never seen a bowed instrument on Gor.

He also says he has never seen sheet music. Songs and melodies tend to be handed down within the caste from father to son or master to apprentice.

I have not attempted to list every imaginable variation of what a musical instrument might be. But I have listed quite a few.


I have never seen a bowed instrument on Gor; also, I might mention, I have never on Gor seen any written music; I do not know if a notation exists; melodies are passed on from father to son, from master to apprentice.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 153


One does not expect a scribe to know the sword. Why, then, should one expect the warrior to know the pen? An excellent example of this sort of thing is the caste of musicians which has, as a whole, resisted many attempts to develop and standardize a musical notation. Songs and melodies tend to be handed down within the caste, from one generation to another. If something is worth playing, it is worth remembering, they say. On the other hand, I suspect that they fear too broad a dissemination of the caste knowledge.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 394


From behind three or four of the low tables, to the left of the counter, a band of sweating musicians sat happily cross-legged on the rug, somehow producing from those unlikely pipes and strings and drums and disks and wires the ever intriguing, wild, enchanting beautiful barbaric melodies of Gor.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Pages 223 - 224





Click a heading to jump down to that topic.


Aulus
Bangles
Bits of Metal on Wires
Cancega
Cotanka
Cymbals
Czehar - eight-stringed instrument
Disks and Wires
Double Flute
Drums
Fife
Filimbi
Flautist
Flute
Flutist
Gourds Filled with Pebbles
Horagai
Horns
Kalika - six-stringed instrument
Kaska - small hand drums
Leather Shield
Lute
Lyre
Notched Sticks
Percussion Variety
Pipes
Rattles
Samisen
Scent-Producer
Slave Bells Mounted On Hand Rings
Slaves Bodies
Small Bars
Sticks
Tabors
Tambourines
Trumpets
Whistles
Zills









 


Aulus
To The Top



*Twice in the manuscript, later, Cabot refers to a "Flute Street." From the context it seems clear that this is "Aulus." I have accordingly edited the manuscript in the interests of consistency, changing "Flute Street" to "Aulus." My interpretation is supported by information supplied by a colleague in the Classics Department, to the effect that there is a Greek expression for a flute which might be transliterated as aulos. I think we may assume then, apart from contextual considerations, that "Aulus" and "Flute Street" are the same street. My conjecture is that aulos was absorbed into Gorean as 'Aulus'. An additional consideration is that "Aulus" is one of the streets bordering the great theater, that of Pentilicus Tallux. Flute music is apparently extremely important in Gorean theater. Indeed, we learn from Cabot's miscellaneous notes that the name of the flute player usually occurs on theatrical advertisements immediately after that of the major performer or performers. It seems the flute player is often on stage and accompanies performers about, pointing up speeches, supplying background music and such. This is accepted as Gorean theatrical convention, it seems, much as background music is accepted in Twentieth Century films, even in such unlikely locations as city streets, airplanes, life rafts and deserts. Various "modes" are supposed, as well, to elicit and express various emotions, some being appropriate for love scenes, others for battle scenes, etc. Lastly it might be mentioned that 'Aulus' can also occur as a Gorean masculine name. This sort of thing is familiar, of course, in all languages, as Smith, Cooper, Chandler, Carpenter, Carter, and such, stand for occupations, and names like Hampshire, Lake, Holm, Rivers, and such, stand for places, and names like Stone, Hammer, Rock, and such, stand for things.

- J.N.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Pages 377 - 378


"If it were night, indoors," said Kurik, "I would suppose any number of things, depending on the house, music, the kalika and czehar, the aulus and tabor, acrobats, jugglers, flute girls, eaters of fire, the reading of poetry the chanting of histories, professional tellers of stories, the singing and dancing of slaves, many things."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 529









 


Bangles
To The Top



As I mused, Talena stepped forth from behind the silk curtain. I had thought she had retired. Instead, she stood before me in the diaphanous, scarlet dancing silks of Gor. She had rouged her lips. My head swam at the sudden intoxicating scent of a wild perfume. Her olive ankles bore dancing bangles with tiny bells. Attached to the thumb and index finger of each hand were tiny finger cymbals. She bent her knees ever so slightly and raised her arms gracefully above her head. There was a sudden bright clash of the finger cymbals, and, to the music of the nearby tent, Talena, daughter of the Ubar of Ar, began to dance for me.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 134


It was customary to find diversions other than Paga in the Paga Taverns, as well, but in gray Tharna the cymbals, drums and flutes of the musicians, the clashing of bangles on the ankles of dancing girls would be unfamiliar sounds.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 75


On some I could hear the movement of the necklaces of sleen teeth tied about their necks, the shivering and ringing of slender golden bangles on their tanned ankles. In their dance they danced among the staked-out bodies of the men of Marlenus, and about the great Ubar himself.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 199


Both of the women lay at his feet. Both would march nude, chained to the stirrup of his tharlarion, in his triumph in Ar. Both would later, in silks and bells, barefoot, in bangles and slave rouge, serve him in his pleasure gardens. Dancing for him, pouring him wine, serving his pleasure, perhaps together, both would much please him. Hura and Mira were lovely souvenirs of the northern forests, fitting mementos for the great Ubar;
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 306


Low on her hips she wore, on a belt of rolled cloth, yellow dancing silk, in Turian drape, the thighs bare, the front right corner of the skirt thrust behind her to the left, the back left lower corner of the skirt thrust into the rolled belt at her right hip. She was barefoot; there were golden bangles, many of them, on her ankles, more on her left ankle. She wore a yellow-silk halter, hooked high, to accentuate the line of her beauty. She wore a gold, locked collar, and, looped about her neck, many light chains and pendants; on her wrists were many bracelets; on her upper arms, both left and right, were armlets, tight, there being again more on the left arm. She shook her head, her hair was loose.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 87


Her teacher was a cafe slave girl, Seleenya, rented from her master; her musicians were a flutist, hired early, and, later, a kaska player, to accompany him.
Once I saw her, naked, covered with sweat and bangles, in the sand.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 102


Alyena now to a swirl of music spun before us, swept helpless with it, bangles clashing, to its climax.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 108


"What shall I do, Master?" she begged. She wore a golden metal dancing collar about her throat, golden chains looped from her wrists, gracefully to the collar ring, then fell to her ankles; there are varieties of Tahari dancing chains; she wore the oval and collar; briefly, in readying a girl, after she has been belled and silked, and bangled, and has been made up, and touched with slave perfume,
. . .

"Dance, Slave," said Hassan.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 215 - 216


Had he wondered what she would look like, long ago, when she was his teacher, she wondered, if she were to so dance before him, barefoot, in a bit of swirling silk, in necklaces and coins, in armlets, with bracelets on her wrists and bangles on her ankles, to the flash of ringing zills, summoned, commanded, fearful, begging to please, his.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 151


There was the music of flutes, and a tabor, and one kalika, and a slave, she of one of Peisistratus' men, stamped her feet, and turned, and danced in the firelight. Bangles clashed upon her bared ankles.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 667


"I thought of myself, frequently enough, as a property, as owned, as a girl who must unquestioningly, fearfully, obey masters, who might dance for their pleasure, about campfires in lonely places, on streets in shabby districts, to a master's flute, on the decks of galleys, to the clapping of hands, on the floor of taverns, to music, silks swirling, bangles clashing, to shouts, to hands reaching for me, to the clash of goblets and the spilling of drink, to the cries of aroused men, pleased to look upon me as I would then be, a vulnerable, helpless slave, desperate to be found pleasing."
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 572









 


Bits of Metal on Wires
To The Top



There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety, bits of metal on wires,
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 153 - 154









 


Cancega
To The Top



"The medicine chief of the dance," said Cuwignaka. "This year it is Cancega, of the Casmu." 'Cancega', here, I think, would be best translated as "Drum." More literally, it is a skin stretched over a hoop. The expression 'cega', itself, may refer to a kettle, a pot, a pail, a bucket, or so on. 'Cancega', then, in a sense, could be taken to mean such things as "Kettle Skin," or "Pot Skin." The translation "Drum," all things considered, seems to be best in this context. I examined in dismay the beads about my neck, the cords at my waist, my barbarically adorned ankles and wrists, I touched my thighs, and lifted my arms, looking at them, and put my hands upon my body, as though I could not believe that it was unclothed. I pretended to shrink down within myself, to desire to crouch down, and conceal and cover my nudity, but then I straightened up, fearfully, as though I had heard commands to desist in such absurdities, and then I extended my hands to the sides, to various sides, as though pleading for mercy, to be released from the imperatives of the music, but then reacted, drawing back, as though I had seen the sight of whips or weapons. The kaska player, alert to this, reduced the volume of his drumming, and then, five times, smote hard upon the taut skin, almost like the cracking of a whip, to which I reacted, turning to one side and another, as though such a disciplinary device had been sounded menacingly, on all sides, in my vicinity, and then I continued to dance, helpless before the will of masters. Then, as the dance continued, I signified by expression and movement my curiosity and fascination with what I was being forced to do, and the responses of my body, reconciled now to its reality, helplessly obedient now to the music.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 32


I heard a drummer testing his instrument. I heard, too, some pipes.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 415


There was the sound of the flute and drum. There was the firelight, the men about, the enclosure, the Vosk in the background, the firelight and the slave.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 33


The two fellows who had supplied the music were silent. One wiped the flute, the other was addressing himself to the tabor, loosening some pegs, relaxing the tension of the drumhead. The drumhead is usually made of verrskin, as most often are wineskins.

"Can they dance?" asked the burly fellow, as though his mind might not yet be made up.

The taborist looked up.

"Alas, no," cried Philebus, in mock dismay, "none of my girls are dancers!"

The taborist continued his work.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 36


There was suddenly a pounding of drums, mighty drums.

"Ai!" cried Cabot, startled.

"That is not difficult to hear, is it?" smiled Peisistratus.

There were twelve such drums, each with two drummers, in the first tier of the arena.

"No," said Cabot.

"There are twelve drums," said Peisistratus. "And there are twelve digits on the two forepaws of the Kur."

"Each has two drummers," said Cabot.

"The Kur has two eyes," said Peisistratus. "Hands and eyes."

"I thought Kur music was silent, or almost so."

"Certainly not silent to the hearing of the Kur," said Peisistratus. "But the drums may not even be understood as music. Those are arena drums, but there are also drums of war, of signaling, of formation, and so on."

Cabot's blood began to race.

Peisistratus, too, was effected by the beating.

"It seems humans and Kurii share drums," said Cabot.

"Drums," said Peisistratus, "speak to the blood, to the heart. They speak of the beat and insistence of life."

"They are used on Gor to marshal and control tarn cavalries, and set the cadence of the wing beat, of the flight," said Cabot.

"Certainly," said Peisistratus.

"Is the sound not too loud for Kurii?" asked Cabot.

"Apparently not," said Peisistratus. "Nor is the crash of thunder, the rolling of waves, the breaking of ice in a frozen river, the tumbling of the avalanche, the eruption of the volcano."

"One gathers its loudness is stimulating."

"Yes, and the rhythms," said Peisistratus.

"They speak of blood, and life, and excitement," said Cabot.

"They have their drums," said Peisistratus, "and we have ours, as well."

"Yes," said Cabot, "of war, and the march, sometimes to measure the stroke of oars, occasionally to signal the opening and closing of markets, of gates, and such."

"There are subtle drums, too, demanding, insistent, maddening, exciting, sensuous drums, of course," said Peisistratus.

"True," said Cabot.

This was presumably an allusion to the use of drums, together with other instruments, we may suppose, in slave dance, a form of dance in which a type of human female, the female slave, helpless and vulnerable, as all female slaves, ornamented, and beautifully if scarcely clothed, dances her beauty, hoping to be found pleasing by masters. If she is not, she knows she may be whipped, perhaps slain.

The drums were suddenly silent.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 231 - 232


There was then a roll of drums, and all eyes turned to the seventh challenger, who now rose from his crouching position, to a height of some ten feet.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 247


There was then a sudden roll of drums.

"What is it?" asked Cabot.

"The climax of the festivities," said Peisistratus.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 251


Cast flowers and sprinkled perfumes, drummers and flautists, preceded her chair, borne by mighty slaves, flanked by liveried guardsmen.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 378


"A tabor is a drum," I said.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 119


I knew that a yearning slave, to one side lying in her chains, must often await the outcome of such a game There was music in the tavern, a czehar player, a drummer, utilizing the small tabor, two flautists, and a pair of kalika players. He with the czehar was the leader. That was common, as I was given to understand.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 346


I assessed him a very strong individual. He reminded me of the professional wrestlers who, with their troops, handlers, and drummers, sometimes visited the local villages and towns.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 475


The supper was pleasant and genteel, suitable for a quiet evening with friends. Nothing was boisterous or rowdy. The ka-la-nas were sparkling and mild, not the sort of coarse ka-la-nas commonly diluted in the wine crater, to a proportion agreed upon by guests, which only wild young men would be likely to drink unmixed, hailing one another with frightful jokes and bawdy songs, awaiting the arrival of the dancers and musicians, the drummers, the flute and kalika girls.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 160


The musicians arrived and took their places at the side of the dancing floor. There was a czehar player, two flutists, and a drummer, with the small tabor. They were followed by the taverner's man who had gone to fetch them. "There are no dancers," said the czehar player, who was the leader of the small group. "Ianthe and Aglaia are unavailable."
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 425









 


Cotanka
To The Top



"Cotanka," said he, "of the Wismahi." As is often the case with the names of the red savages they do not translate simply and directly into a different language. The expression 'cotanka' usually designates a fife or flute, but it may also be used more broadly to refer to any wind instrument whatsoever. Given the cultural milieu involved and the narrower understanding of that expression within that milieu perhaps the best translation, supplying connotations familiar to the red savages, might be 'Love Flute'.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 236 - 237









 


Cymbals
To The Top



I could hear from a tent nearby the sound of a flute, some soft drums, and the rhythmic jangle of some tiny cymbals.

As I mused, Talena stepped forth from behind the silk curtain. I had thought she had retired. Instead, she stood before me in the diaphanous, scarlet dancing silks of Gor. She had rouged her lips. My head swam at the sudden intoxicating scent of a wild perfume. Her olive ankles bore dancing bangles with tiny bells. Attached to the thumb and index finger of each hand were tiny finger cymbals. She bent her knees ever so slightly and raised her arms gracefully above her head. There was a sudden bright clash of the finger cymbals, and, to the music of the nearby tent, Talena, daughter of the Ubar of Ar, began to dance for me.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 134


She danced before me for several minutes, her scarlet dancing silks flashing in the firelight, her bare feet, with their belled ankles, striking softly on the carpet. With a last flash of the finger cymbals, she fell to the carpet before me, her breath hot and quick, her eyes blazing with desire.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 135


It was customary to find diversions other than Paga in the Paga Taverns, as well, but in gray Tharna the cymbals, drums and flutes of the musicians, the clashing of bangles on the ankles of dancing girls would be unfamiliar sounds.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 75


To one side, across a clearing from the fire, a bit in the background, was a group of nine musicians. They were not as yet playing, though one of them was absently tapping a rhythm on a small hand drum, the kaska; two others, with stringed instruments, were tuning them, putting their ears to the instruments. One of the instruments was an eight-stringed czehar, rather like a large flat oblong box; it is held across the lap when sitting cross-legged and is played with a horn pick; the other was the kalika, a six-stringed instrument; it, like the czehar, is flat-bridged and its strings are adjusted by means of small wooden cranks; on the other hand, it less resembles a low, flat box and suggests affinities to the banjo or guitar, though the sound box is hemispheric and the neck rather long; it, too, of course, like the czehar, is plucked; I have never seen a bowed instrument on Gor; also, I might mention, I have never on Gor seen any written music; I do not know if a notation exists; melodies are passed on from father to son, from master to apprentice. There was another kalika player, as well, but he was sitting there holding his instrument, watching the slave girls in the audience. The three flutists were polishing their instruments and talking together; it was shop talk I gathered, because one or the other would stop to illustrate some remark by a passage on his flute, and then one of the others would attempt to correct or improve on what he had done; occasionally their discussion grew heated. There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety, bits of metal on wires, gourds filled with pebbles, slave bells mounted on hand rings, and such. These various things, from time to time, would be used not only by himself but by others in the group, probably the second kaska player and the third flutist. Among Gorean musicians, incidentally, czehar players have the most prestige; there was only one in this group, I noted, and he was their leader; next follow the flutists and then the players of the kalika; the players of the drums come next; and the farthest fellow down the list is the man who keeps the bag of miscellaneous instruments, playing them and parceling them out to others as needed. Lastly it might be mentioned, thinking it is of some interest, musicians on Gor are never enslaved; they may, of course, be exiled, tortured, slain and such; it is said, perhaps truly, that he who makes music must, like the tarn and the Vosk gull, be free.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 153 - 154


Under the torchlight Phyllis Robertson was now on her knees, the Warrior at her side, holding her behind the small of the back. Her head went farther back, as her hands moved on the arms of the Warrior, as though once to press him away, and then again to draw him closer, and her head then touched the furs, her body a cruel, helpless bow in his hands, and then, her head down, it seemed she struggled and her body straightened itself until she lay, save for her head and heels, on his hands clasped behind her back, her arms extended over her head to the fur behind her. At this point, with a clash of cymbals, both dancers remained immobile. Then, after this instant of silence under the torches, the music struck the final note, with a mighty and jarring clash of cymbals, and the Warrior had lowered her to the furs and her lips, arms about his neck, sought his with eagerness. Then, both dancers broke apart and the male stepped back, and Phyllis now stood, alone on the furs, sweating, breathing deeply, head down.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Pages 187 - 188


We heard music in the distance, trumpets, drums and cymbals. We looked at one another, scarcely able to restrain ourselves.
. . .

The drums, the cymbals, the trumpets, were now quite close. I lifted up an edge of the rain canvas and peeped through.
. . .

Behind him came musicians, with their trumpets, and cymbals and drums. They, too, wore skins, and the heads of forest panthers.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 209


I heard the blare of the trumpets, the clash of the cymbals, the pounding of the drums.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 213


We heard the drums, the trumpets and clashing cymbals growing fainter, down the street, as the retinue continued on its way.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 216


The girl wore Gorean dancing silk. It hung low upon her bared hips, and fell to her ankles. It was scarlet, diaphanous. A front corner of the silk was taken behind her and thrust, loose and draped, into the rolled silk knotted about her hips; a back corner of the silk was drawn before her and thrust loosely, draped, into the rolled silk at her right hip. Low on her hips she wore a belt of small denomination, threaded, overlapping golden coins. A veil concealed her muchly from us, it thrust into the strap of the coined halter at her left shoulder, and into the coined belt at her right hip. On her arms she wore numerous armlets and bracelets. On the thumb and first finger of both her left and right hand were golden finger cymbals. On her throat was a collar.
. . .

There was a clear note of the finger cymbals, sharp, delicate, bright, and the slave girl danced before us.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 8


The dancer's hands were at her thighs. She regarded them, angrily, and still she moved. Her shoulders lifted and fell; her hands touched her breasts and shoulders; her head was back, and then again she glared at the men, angrily. Her arms were high, very high. Her hips moved, swaying. Then, the music suddenly silent, she was absolutely still. Her left hand was at her thigh; her right high above her head; her eyes were on her hip; frozen into a hip sway; then there was again a bright, clear flash of the finger cymbals, and the music began again, and again she moved, helpless on the pole. Men threw coins at her feet.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 11


The belled left ankle of the dancer moved in a small circle on the mosaiced floor, to the ringing of the bells, and the counterpoint of the finger cymbals.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 19


She bent her knees, weight on her heels, lifted her hands, high over her head, wrists close together, back to back, on her thumbs and fingers, poised, tiny cymbals.

I nodded to the musicians. The music began. There was a bright flash of the tiny finger cymbals and Alyena danced for us.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 87


I glanced within, for I heard from within the clash of slave bells and the bright sound of zills, or finger cymbals.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 21


Outside, in the canal traffic, I heard a drum, cymbals and trumpets, and a man shouting.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 9


"Do you know the use of finger cymbals?" he asked.

"No, Master," I said.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 381


I did not know who "we" were. I did not understand where I was. Surely the common slave tunic, often of rep-cloth, was short enough, and well identified its occupant as a slave. At least it was usually of rep-cloth, or of some other cloth, such as the wool of the bounding hurt, and, even when of silk, it was seldom diaphanous. One could well imagine the reaction of free women to that! In the latter aspect, diaphanous, it was rather like the yellow or red dancing silk in which the tavern dancers swirled amidst their veils, their shimmering jewelries, often to the sparkle of finger cymbals.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 226


But he had unbuckled the curtain, departed, and yanked it shut behind him. I caught the briefest glimpse of tanned legs in the sand, each ankle ringed with slave bells, and a swirling skirt of scarlet dancing silk. I heard the jangle of jewelry, and the sudden, bright flash of finger cymbals. I heard men crying out, and pounding paga goblets on the tables.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 272









 


Czehar
To The Top



To one side, across a clearing from the fire, a bit in the background, was a group of nine musicians. They were not as yet playing, though one of them was absently tapping a rhythm on a small hand drum, the kaska; two others, with stringed instruments, were tuning them, putting their ears to the instruments. One of the instruments was an eight-stringed czehar, rather like a large flat oblong box; it is held across the lap when sitting cross-legged and is played with a horn pick; the other was the kalika, a six-stringed instrument; it, like the czehar, is flat-bridged and its strings are adjusted by means of small wooden cranks; on the other hand, it less resembles a low, flat box and suggests affinities to the banjo or guitar, though the sound box is hemispheric and the neck rather long; it, too, of course, like the czehar, is plucked; I have never seen a bowed instrument on Gor; also, I might mention, I have never on Gor seen any written music; I do not know if a notation exists; melodies are passed on from father to son, from master to apprentice. There was another kalika player, as well, but he was sitting there holding his instrument, watching the slave girls in the audience. The three flutists were polishing their instruments and talking together; it was shop talk I gathered, because one or the other would stop to illustrate some remark by a passage on his flute, and then one of the others would attempt to correct or improve on what he had done; occasionally their discussion grew heated. There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety, bits of metal on wires, gourds filled with pebbles, slave bells mounted on hand rings, and such. These various things, from time to time, would be used not only by himself but by others in the group, probably the second kaska player and the third flutist. Among Gorean musicians, incidentally, czehar players have the most prestige; there was only one in this group, I noted, and he was their leader; next follow the flutists and then the players of the kalika; the players of the drums come next; and the farthest fellow down the list is the man who keeps the bag of miscellaneous instruments, playing them and parceling them out to others as needed. Lastly it might be mentioned, thinking it is of some interest, musicians on Gor are never enslaved; they may, of course, be exiled, tortured, slain and such; it is said, perhaps truly, that he who makes music must, like the tarn and the Vosk gull, be free.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 153 - 154


Now that the sport was done some Musicians filed in, taking up positions to one side. There was a czehar player, two players of the kalika, four flutists and a pair of kaska drummers.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 88


A number of Musicians now filed out from the door at the foot of the block and took their places about it, sitting cross-legged on the floor. Those with string instruments began to tune them; there was a czehar player, the group's leader, some kalika players, some flutists, players of the kaska, small drums, and others. Each of these, in his way, prepared himself for the evening, sketching out melodies or sound patterns, lost with himself.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 291


"Yes," said Samos. He clapped his hands. Immediately the girl stood beautifully, alert, before us, her arms high, wrists outward. The musicians, to one side, stirred, readying themselves. Their leader was a czehar player.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 8


There was only one musician at the side of the sand. Others would join him later. Their leader was Andronicus, who played the czehar.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 293


As we spoke some five musicians entered the room and took their places to one side. There was a czehar player, two flutists, a kalika player, and a player on the kaska, a small hand drum.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 277


The Lady Florence turned to the musicians, who were sitting to one side. "You may play," she said.

"Yes, Lady Florence," said the czehar player, their leader.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 286


The Lady Florence then signaled to the musicians. There was a swirl of music and a beating on the drum, and then a pause, and then began, with the czehar prominent, the strains of a slow Gorean melody. And Melpomene, the collared slave, danced, entertaining the guests of her Mistress, the Lady Florence of Vonda.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 289


There were seven musicians, who furnished the music for the dancers, a czehar player, their leader, two kalika players, three flutists and a kaska player. Tasdron kindly had brought these fellows from his tavern.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 234


I enjoyed the czehar concert," I said, lightly.

"Good," he said.

The czehar is a long, low, rectangular instrument. It is played, held across the lap. It has eight strings, plucked with a horn pick. It had been played by Lysander of Aspericbe. The concert had taken place two nights ago in the small theater of Kleitos, off the square of Perimines.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 108


"I thought Lysander played well," I said.

"He is regarded as one of the finest czehar players on all Gor," said Drusus Rencius, dryly.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 110


Hendow gestured with his head to the musicians, and they made their way, one by one, through the beaded curtain. There were five of them, a czehar player, two kalika players, a flautist and a drummer. In a moment or two, as Mirus solicited further interest among the customers, I heard the sounds of the instruments, the czehar and kalikas being toned, the flautist trying passages, the drummer's fingers light on the taut skin of his instrument, the kaska, then adjusting it, then trying it again, then tapping lightly, then more vigorously, with swift, brief rhythms, limbering his wrists, fingers and hands. The music of Gor, or much of it, is very melodious and sensuous. Much of it seems made for the display of slaves before free men, but then, I suppose, that is exactly what it is made for.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 179 - 180


The czehar player, sitting cross-legged, now had his instrument across his lap. He was the leader of the musicians. He had his horn pick in hand.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 191


"Are you ready?" asked the leader of the musicians, the czehar player.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 192


We were still to be hot, and ready, paga slaves, eager to serve, and fully, the silk no more than an invitation to its removal. This was not much different, incidentally, than what was the case in even the most prestigious paga taverns.
. . .

That was the purpose of such places, whether they were within lofty towers, reached by graceful bridges, or near the wharves, close enough to hear the tide lapping at the pilings, whether they had a dozen musicians or only a single, dissolute czehar player, alone with his music, whether the girls were richly silked or stark naked, save for brands and collars, whether there were chains of gold and luxurious furs in the alcoves or only wire and straw mats. They were paga taverns.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 245


"Have you heard the news?" a fellow was eagerly asking another, outside, in the main paga room. The music had stopped. A dancer had fled back behind a beaded curtain, dismissed by the czehar player, he who led the musicians.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 410


"Is there to be entertainment?" he asked.

"Czehar music," she said, "and, later, the recitation of poetry by Milo, the famed actor, to the music of the double flute."
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 156


"Superbly fitting," she laughed. "But come early. You would not wish to miss the czehar music nor the performance of Milo."

"You are retaining the czehar player and the actor then," he asked.

"Yes," she said. "I promised him."
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 158


In another place, within a rectangle of canvas walls, on a small stage, as the music of flutes and a czehar drifted upward, she saw acrobats, jugglers and fire-eaters.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 342


The music of czehars, flutes, and kalikas, from scattered bands of musicians, swirled throughout the gigantic festival camp, spread over pasangs.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 389


Some of the slaves already, to the music of the czehars and other instruments, which was clearly audible everywhere in the camp, danced.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 393


Men, the arrogant, masterful beasts, thought Ellen, biting her lip, grinding her fingernails into the palms of her hands. How vulnerable we are! How they make us theirs! They play us like czehars, drawing what music they will from our bodies!
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 412


There was a skirl of music from the musicians outside, to one side of the sand, flutes, czehars, two kalikas, a tabor.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 431


The first czehar player, in whose charge were the musicians, appeared puzzled as well, but continued to elicit from his instrument, held across his knees, subtle melodies which sang of life and nature, which hinted of men and women, and masters and slaves. The music followed Ellen, quietly, expectantly, enhancing her contrived mystery.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 439


Then suddenly on the sand, she stopped, near its center, and looked out, toward the crowd. The music stopped with her. She took a step backward, and then another step. And the czehar player underlined these steps.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 442


She stopped dancing for a moment, confused, but tried not to look at Selius Arconious, lest their eyes meet.

The czehar player looked up, puzzled.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 447


With a swirl from the czehar and kalikas, and a pounding of the tabors, the dancers prostrated themselves in the sand, as slaves, and then, as Peisistratus struck his hands sharply together, they leapt up, and fled from the room, exiting through a portal, it curtained with dangling strands of blue and yellow beads, the caste colors of the slavers.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 164


I had seen them dancing in the firelight, in camps, to the rhythms of the czehar, the kalika, the flute, and tabor.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 363


Many masters, in their pride and vanity, and as evidence of their wealth, good fortune, or taste, enjoy displaying their slaves, much as owners of various goods, of various sorts, enjoy displaying other sorts of properties, statuary, rare coins, artworks, fountains, veminium gardens, classical czehars, early editions of famous scrolls, antique kaissa sets, and such.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 271


Well now was I aware of how I might have responded had they been concerned less to routinely open a young slave and had they been more patient, slower, less merciful. What if they had been tortuously slow, reading my body, playing upon it, as on a czehar or kalika bringing forth what music they wished?
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 109


I knew that a yearning slave, to one side lying in her chains, must often await the outcome of such a game There was music in the tavern, a czehar player, a drummer, utilizing the small tabor, two flautists, and a pair of kalika players. He with the czehar was the leader. That was common, as I was given to understand.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 346


"Surely she has more serious opinions," said another, "as to the ranking of the nine classic poets, the values of the Turian hexameter, should prose be allowed in song drama, the historicity of Hesius, the reform of the calendar, the dark geometries, the story of the czehar, the policies of the Salarian confederation, the nature of the moons, the sumptuary laws of Ti, the history of Ar."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 199 - 200


Why should they, out here in the forest, be discussing tunes, czehars, flutes, kalikas, and such?
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 371 - 372


I saw, centrally, a circle of sand, which, I supposed, was dancing sand. There were cushions to the side, probably for musicians. The accompaniment for a dancer can vary considerably, from as little as a single flute, often the case with a street dancer, to several individuals and a variety of instruments. A typical group would consist of a czehar player, usually the leader, one or two flautists, one or two players of the kalika, and a taborist.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 263


"If it were night, indoors," said Kurik, "I would suppose any number of things, depending on the house, music, the kalika and czehar, the aulus and tabor, acrobats, jugglers, flute girls, eaters of fire, the reading of poetry the chanting of histories, professional tellers of stories, the singing and dancing of slaves, many things."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 529


During the moment the door was ajar, I saw lamps within, and some men milling about. Two held goblets, probably of paga. There was also a screen. I heard some music, a czehar tabor, and flute. I could not see the musicians. They and, I supposed, the wheel, were behind the screen.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 654


I listened to the music, supplied by a czehar player, which, now, was soft, slow, and sensuous. No dancer was now performing. Later the czehar player would be joined by his fellows, two with kalikas, two with flutes, and one on the tabor. The czehar player was the leader of the group. That seems to be common.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 123


The czehar player had stopped briefly, looking up when the girl had cried out, but now resumed his playing.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 125


The musicians arrived and took their places at the side of the dancing floor. There was a czehar player, two flutists, and a drummer, with the small tabor. They were followed by the taverner's man who had gone to fetch them. "There are no dancers," said the czehar player, who was the leader of the small group. "Ianthe and Aglaia are unavailable."

"One has been sent for," said Ho-Tosk, "from the holding of Bosk."

"Let us withdraw," said the leader of the group.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 425


"I think we shall withdraw," said the czehar player.

"Stay where you are," said Ho-Tosk.

"I fear insurrection," said a taverner's man, he who had fetched the musicians. "If it were in the streets, we could nail boards across the portal."

"Perhaps," said the czehar player, "you should do so anyway, to keep it from reaching the streets."
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 428


"Ready?" asked Ho-Tosk to the musicians.

"This will not take long," said the czehar player.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 435


"You are ready?" said Ho-Tosk to the musicians.

"Yes," said the czehar player.

"Play," said Ho-Tosk.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 436









 


Disks and Wires
To The Top



From behind three or four of the low tables, to the left of the counter, a band of sweating musicians sat happily cross-legged on the rug, somehow producing from those unlikely pipes and strings and drums and disks and wires the ever intriguing, wild, enchanting beautiful barbaric melodies of Gor.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Pages 223 - 224









 


Double Flute
To The Top



My master had a double flute slung on his back. He was Gordon, an itinerant musician.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 281


I may have been mistaken, but I felt that men were looking at me. Perhaps they had noticed, too, the double flute on my master's back.
. . .

My master removed his long double flute from his back.

I braced myself for an instant.

He played then a set of annunciatory skirls.

I think that anyone in the square must have heard those sounds. He then, for two or three minutes, played soft, full, melodious tunes, sensuous, inviting tunes.
. . .

With the music of the double flute in the background I modestly removed the Ta-Teera, putting it to the side.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 283 - 284


On the wall, in the trough of the breach, we saw four men rolling a heavy stone toward the field side of the wall. A flute girl was parodying, or accompanying, their efforts on the flute, the instrument seeming to strain with them, and then, when they rolled the stone down, she played a skirl of descending notes on the flute, and, spinning about, danced away. The men laughed.

"I have seen enough," said Marcus.

There was suddenly near us, startling us, another skirl of notes on a flute, the common double flute. A flute girl, come apparently from the wall side of the Wall Road, danced tauntingly near us, to our right, and, with the flute, while playing, gestured toward the wall, as though encouraging us to join the others in their labor. I, and Marcus, I am sure, were angry. Not only had we been startled by the sudden, intrusive noise, which the girl must have understood would have been the case, but we resented the insinuation that we might be such as would of our own will join the work on the wall. Did she think we were of Ar, that we were of the conquered, the pacified, the confused and fooled, the verbally manipulated, the innocuous, the predictable, the tamed? She was an exciting brunet, in a short tunic of diaphanous silk. She was slender, and was probably kept on a carefully supervised diet by her master or trainer. Her dark eyes shone with amusement. She pranced before us, playing. She waved the flute again toward the wall.

We regarded her.

She again gestured, playing, toward the wall.

I had little doubt that she assumed from our appearance in this area that we were of Ar. We did not move. A gesture of annoyance crossed her lovely features. She played more determinedly, as though we might not understand her intent.

Still we did not move.

Then, angrily, she spun about, dancing, to return to her former post near the wall side of the Wall Road. She was attractive, even insolently so, at the moment, in the diaphanous silk.

"You have not been given permission to withdraw," I said, evenly.

She turned about, angrily, holding the flute.

"You are armed," she suddenly said, perhaps then for the first time really noting this homely fact.

"We are not of Ar," I said.

"Oh," she said, standing her ground, trembling a little.

"Are you accustomed to standing in the presence of free men?" I asked.

"I will kneel if it will please you," she said.

"If you not kneel," I said, "it is possible that I may be displeased."

She regarded me.

"Kneel," I said.

Swiftly she knelt.

I walked over to her and, taking her by the hair, twisting it, she crying out, turned her about and threw her to her belly on the Wall Road.

She sobbed in anger.

Marcus and I crouched near her.

"Oh!" she said.

"She is not in the iron belt," said Marcus.

"That is a further insult to those of Ar," I said, "that they would put unbelted flute girls among them."

"Yes," growled Marcus.

The tone of his voice, I am sure, did nothing to set our fair prisoner at ease. Flute girls, incidentally, when hired from their master, to entertain and serve at parties, are commonly unbelted, that for the convenience of the guests.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Pages 120 - 122


"Czehar music," she said, "and, later, the recitation of poetry by Milo, the famed actor, to the music of the double flute." The instrument which is played by the flute girls is a double flute, too, but I had little doubt that the player involved would not be a flute girl but someone associated with one or another of the theaters of Ar. Similarly the instrument would undoubtedly be far superior, in both range and tone, to those likely to be at the disposal of flute girls.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 156









 


Drums
To The Top



I could hear from a tent nearby the sound of a flute, some soft drums, and the rhythmic jangle of some tiny cymbals.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 134


Then, to the festive music of flutes and drums, the girl kneels. The young man approaches her, bearing a slave collar, its engraving proclaiming his name and city. The music grows more intense, mounting to an overpowering, barbaric crescendo, which stops suddenly, abruptly. The room is silent, absolutely silent, except for the decisive click of the collar lock.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 52


The music begins again. Perhaps the girl hesitates. There is a slave whip on the wall. Then, to the barbaric, intoxicating music of the flute and drums, she dances for her captor, the bells on her ankles marking each of her movements, the movements of a girl stolen from her home, who must now live to please the bold stranger whose binding fiber she had felt, whose collar she wore.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 53


It was customary to find diversions other than Paga in the Paga Taverns, as well, but in gray Tharna the cymbals, drums and flutes of the musicians, the clashing of bangles on the ankles of dancing girls would be unfamiliar sounds.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 75


From behind three or four of the low tables, to the left of the counter, a band of sweating musicians sat happily cross-legged on the rug, somehow producing from those unlikely pipes and strings and drums and disks and wires the ever intriguing, wild, enchanting beautiful barbaric melodies of Gor.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Pages 223 - 224


More than once we encountered a line of musicians dancing single file down the center of the street, playing on their flutes and drums, perhaps on their way to a feast.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 87


Then, to my surprise, the girl clapped her hands sharply twice and the women about the table stood, and together, from both sides, moved swiftly to stand before us between the tables. The drums and flutes of the musicians sounded, and to my amazement the first girl, with a sudden, graceful swirl of her body lifted away her robes and flung them high over the heads of the guests to cries of delight. She stood facing us, beautiful, knees flexed, breathing deeply, arms lifted over her head, ready for the dance. Each of the women I had thought free did the same, until each stood before us, a collared slave girl clad only in the diaphanous, scarlet dancing silks of Gor. To the barbaric music they danced. Kamchak was angry.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 96


I would not tell Miss Cardwell but the rhythm was the drum rhythm of the Chain Dance.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 112


To one side, across a clearing from the fire, a bit in the background, was a group of nine musicians. They were not as yet playing, though one of them was absently tapping a rhythm on a small hand drum, the kaska; two others, with stringed instruments, were tuning them, putting their ears to the instruments. One of the instruments was an eight-stringed czehar, rather like a large flat oblong box; it is held across the lap when sitting cross-legged and is played with a horn pick; the other was the kalika, a six-stringed instrument; it, like the czehar, is flat-bridged and its strings are adjusted by means of small wooden cranks; on the other hand, it less resembles a low, flat box and suggests affinities to the banjo or guitar, though the sound box is hemispheric and the neck rather long; it, too, of course, like the czehar, is plucked; I have never seen a bowed instrument on Gor; also, I might mention, I have never on Gor seen any written music; I do not know if a notation exists; melodies are passed on from father to son, from master to apprentice. There was another kalika player, as well, but he was sitting there holding his instrument, watching the slave girls in the audience. The three flutists were polishing their instruments and talking together; it was shop talk I gathered, because one or the other would stop to illustrate some remark by a passage on his flute, and then one of the others would attempt to correct or improve on what he had done; occasionally their discussion grew heated. There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety, bits of metal on wires, gourds filled with pebbles, slave bells mounted on hand rings, and such. These various things, from time to time, would be used not only by himself but by others in the group, probably the second kaska player and the third flutist. Among Gorean musicians, incidentally, czehar players have the most prestige; there was only one in this group, I noted, and he was their leader; next follow the flutists and then the players of the kalika; the players of the drums come next; and the farthest fellow down the list is the man who keeps the bag of miscellaneous instruments, playing them and parceling them out to others as needed. Lastly it might be mentioned, thinking it is of some interest, musicians on Gor are never enslaved; they may, of course, be exiled, tortured, slain and such; it is said, perhaps truly, that he who makes music must, like the tarn and the Vosk gull, be free.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 153 - 154


The figure of the woman, swathed in black, heavily veiled, descended the steps of the slave wagon. Once at the foot of the stairs she stopped and stood for a long moment. Then the musicians began, the hand-drums first, a rhythm of heartbeat and flight.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 159 - 160


Now that the sport was done some Musicians filed in, taking up positions to one side. There was a czehar player, two players of the kalika, four flutists and a pair of kaska drummers.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 88


A number of Musicians now filed out from the door at the foot of the block and took their places about it, sitting cross-legged on the floor. Those with string instruments began to tune them; there was a czehar player, the group's leader, some kalika players, some flutists, players of the kaska, small drums, and others. Each of these, in his way, prepared himself for the evening, sketching out melodies or sound patterns, lost with himself.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 291


Then there came a drumming sound, growing louder and louder, a man pounding on a hollowed drum of rence root with two sticks, and then, as suddenly as the singing and clapping, the drum, too, stopped.
. . .

Then the man with the drum of hollow rence root began to drum, and I heard some others join in with reed flutes, and one fellow had bits of metal, strung on a circular wire, and another a notched stick, played by scraping it with a flat spoon of rence root.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Pages 44 - 45


The injured galley then is like a broken-winged bird, and at the mercy of the other ship's ram as she comes about, flutes playing and drums beating, and makes her strike amidships.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 137


Although I had had the masts, with their yards, taken down and lashed to the decks, and the sails stored below, I had the flutists and drummers, not uncommon on the ram-ships of Thassa, strike up a martial air.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 197


I listened for a while, chuckling, to the brave tunes being put forth by my flutists and drummers.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 198


I watched her, in the training sand, dancing to hide drums, naked, in slave bracelets and jeweled dancing collar. She did not then appear to be of the blue-robed, studious scribes. She was only a naked, dancing slave girl, exciting, writhing in the sand, her body throbbing to the beat of a man's pleasure drums.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 174


We heard music in the distance, trumpets, drums and cymbals. We looked at one another, scarcely able to restrain ourselves.
. . .

The drums, the cymbals, the trumpets, were now quite close. I lifted up an edge of the rain canvas and peeped through.
. . .

Behind him came musicians, with their trumpets, and cymbals and drums.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 209


I heard the blare of the trumpets, the clash of the cymbals, the pounding of the drums.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 213


We heard the drums, the trumpets and clashing cymbals growing fainter, down the street, as the retinue continued on its way.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 216


Rask clapped his hands once, and four musicians, who had been waiting outside, entered the tent, and took a place to one side. Two had small drums, one a flute, the other a stringed instrument.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 302


We heard the beating of a drum and the playing of flutes.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 48


Flanking the wagon, on both sides, were the musicians, with their drums and flutes.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 49


The judges, I noted, had left. The musicians, those who had played the drums and flutes, escorting the judges and the prisoner, had also left.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 51


There were several large campfires in the clearing. Among them, staked out, were the men of Marlenus. A man of Tyros had a hide drum and, at one side of the clearing, was pounding out a monotonous, repetitive preparatory rhythm.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 193


The tempo of the man with the drum increased. I could see the shadows of tents beyond the clearing.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 194


There was a long silence, of some Ihn, and then, at a nod from Hura, who threw her long black hair back and lifted her head to the moons, the drum began again its beat. Mira's head was down, and shaking. Her right foot was stamping. The panther girls put down their heads. I saw their fists begin to clench and unclench. They stood, scarcely moving, but I could sense the movement of the drum in their blood.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 197


The drum was now very heady, swift. The dance of the panther girls became more wild, more frenzied.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 198


Behind me, as I thrust apart the beads, I heard the pounding of the drum, the kaska, the silence, then the sound, as the flutist, his hands on her body, to the sound of the drum, instructed the girl in the line-length and intensity of one of the varieties of pre-abandonment pelvic thrusts.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 104


"I have not seen the performance of a drum dance in four moons," he said.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 165


The drum of the red hunters is large and heavy. It has a handle and is disklike. It requires strength to manage it. It is held in one hand and beaten with a stick held in the other. Its frame is generally of wood and its cover, of hide, usually tabuk hide, is fixed on the frame by sinew. Interestingly the drum is not struck on the head, or hide cover, but on the frame. It has an odd resonance. That drum in the hand of the hunter standing now in the midst of the group was some two and one half feet in diameter. He was now striking on it and singing.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Pages 261 - 262


A skirl on a flute and a sudden pounding on twin tabors, small, hand drums, called my attention to the square of sand at the side of which sat the musicians.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 133


There was much singing. There were numerous torches, and drums.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 322


Within the stockade of the Mamba people there was much light and noise. I could hear the sounds of their musical instruments, and the pounding of their drums. Within the stockade, too, we could hear the chanting of the people and the beating of sticks, carried in the hands of dancers.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 399


Within the stockade of the Mamba people there was much light and noise. I could hear the sounds of their musical instruments, and the pounding of the drums. Too, we could hear, within, the sounds of chanting and the beatings of the sticks carried in the hands of the dancers.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 401


As we spoke some five musicians entered the room and took their places to one side. There was a czehar player, two flutists, a kalika player, and a player on the kaska, a small hand drum.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 277


The Lady Florence then signaled to the musicians. There was a swirl of music and a beating on the drum, and then a pause, and then began, with the czehar prominent, the strains of a slow Gorean melody. And Melpomene, the collared slave, danced, entertaining the guests of her Mistress, the Lady Florence of Vonda.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 289


Within the holding I could hear the sound of flutes, drums and kalikas. The melody, however, was slow and decorous.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 97


But, of course, there are many ways in which the order of nature may be acknowledged. Another is that in which the woman, naked and collared, branded, under a man's whip, writhes at his feet to the beating of drums.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 99


"The medicine chief of the dance," said Cuwignaka. "This year it is Cancega, of the Casmu." 'Cancega', here, I think, would be best translated as "Drum." More literally, it is a skin stretched over a hoop. The expression 'cega', itself, may refer to a kettle, a pot, a pail, a bucket, or so on. 'Cancega', then, in a sense, could be taken to mean such things as "Kettle Skin," or "Pot Skin." The translation "Drum," all things considered, seems to be best in this context.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 32


Winyela then heard the rattles behind her, giving her her rhythm. These rattles were then joined by the firing of whistles, shrill and high, formed from the wing bones of the taloned Herlit. A small drum, too, then began to sound its more accented beats, approached subtly but predictably, instructed the helpless, lovely dancer as to the placement and timing of the more dramatic of her demonstrations and motions.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 40


Suddenly we heard the shaking of rattles, the beating of small hand drums. The Yellow Knives opened their lines. The soldiers, too, drew back. In the corridor then formed, in the gloom, their bodies painted, brush tied about their wrists and ankles, chanting, stomping, turning about and shuffling, came dancers. They wore masks.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 263


Otherwise, had I gone abroad in the robes of the Tatrix, we would have been encumbered by guards and crowds; we would have had to travel in a palanquin; we would have been forced to tolerate the annunciatory drums and trumpets, and put up with all the noisy, ostentatious, dreary panoply of office.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 100


The drummer and the flautist prepared once more to play.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 142


Outside, in the canal traffic, I heard a drum, cymbals and trumpets, and a man shouting.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 9


Outside I could hear the sounds of yet another troupe traversing the canal, with its raucous cries, its drums and trumpets.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 30


A fellow from the audience was invited forward to test the locks. He tried them, stoutly, and then, grudgingly, attested to their placement and solidity. He was requested to retain the keys. The lovely young woman then stepped into a nearby vertical cabinet. The crowd looked at one another. Then a drum roll, furnished by a fellow to one side, suddenly commenced and, steadily, increased in volume and intensity. At its sudden climax, followed by an instant of startling silence, the door of the vertical cabinet burst open and the magician, smiling, to cries of surprise, of awe and wonder, stepped forth, waving, his hands free, greeting the crowd. He wasted not a moment but searched out the startled fellow with the keys and began swiftly, one by one, to unlock the padlocks. In a moment, thrusting back the externally mounted security bolts, the padlocks already removed, he had the trunk open. The crowd was breathless, sensing what might, but could not, be the case. He jerked the sack inside to an upright position. I noticed that it was now secured with a capture knot, a knot of a sort commonly used in securing captives and slaves. He undid the knot. Then, to another drum roll, he opened the mouth of the sack. At the climax of this drum roll, after its moment of startling silence, the figure of a beautiful, naked, hooded female, her wrists locked in slave bracelets, sprang up. The magician bowed to the crowd.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 40


Hendow gestured with his head to the musicians, and they made their way, one by one, through the beaded curtain. There were five of them, a czehar player, two kalika players, a flautist and a drummer. In a moment or two, as Mirus solicited further interest among the customers, I heard the sounds of the instruments, the czehar and kalikas being toned, the flautist trying passages, the drummer's fingers light on the taut skin of his instrument, the kaska, then adjusting it, then trying it again, then tapping lightly, then more vigorously, with swift, brief rhythms, limbering his wrists, fingers and hands. The music of Gor, or much of it, is very melodious and sensuous. Much of it seems made for the display of slaves before free men, but then, I suppose, that is exactly what it is made for.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 179 - 180


Suddenly in my dance it seemed I was a virgin, reluctant and fearful, terrified in the reality in which she found herself, but knowing she must respond to the music, to those heady, sensuous rhythms, to the wild cries of the flute, to the beating of the drum. I then danced timidity, and reluctance and inhibition, but yet reflecting, as one would, in such a situation, the commands of the music.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 194 - 195









 


Fife
To The Top



"Cotanka," said he, "of the Wismahi." As is often the case with the names of the red savages they do not translate simply and directly into a different language. The expression 'cotanka' usually designates a fife or flute, but it may also be used more broadly to refer to any wind instrument whatsoever. Given the cultural milieu involved and the narrower understanding of that expression within that milieu perhaps the best translation, supplying connotations familiar to the red savages, might be 'Love Flute'.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 236 - 237









 


Filimbi
To The Top



The man from the tavern of Filimbi, to which she had been sold after I had been taken from Schendi, some months ago, was but a few feet behind her. He had unleashed her that she might run to me. She still wore a brief work tunic from the tavern, with the sign of the tavern, a flute, on its back. Filimbi was the name of the proprietor, but it is also an inland word for flute.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 461









 


Flute
To The Top



I could hear from a tent nearby the sound of a flute, some soft drums, and the rhythmic jangle of some tiny cymbals.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 134


That night, at a great feast, he displays the captive, now suitably attired by his sisters in the diaphanous, scarlet dancing silks of Gor. Bells have been strapped to her ankles, and she is bound in slave bracelets. Proudly, he presents her to his parents, his friends and warrior comrades.

Then, to the festive music of flutes and drums, the girl kneels. The young man approaches her, bearing a slave collar, its engraving proclaiming his name and city. The music grows more intense, mounting to an overpowering, barbaric crescendo, which stops suddenly, abruptly. The room is silent, absolutely silent, except for the decisive click of the collar lock.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 52


The music begins again. Perhaps the girl hesitates. There is a slave whip on the wall. Then, to the barbaric, intoxicating music of the flute and drums, she dances for her captor, the bells on her ankles marking each of her movements, the movements of a girl stolen from her home, who must now live to please the bold stranger whose binding fiber she had felt, whose collar she wore.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 53


It was customary to find diversions other than Paga in the Paga Taverns, as well, but in gray Tharna the cymbals, drums and flutes of the musicians, the clashing of bangles on the ankles of dancing girls would be unfamiliar sounds.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 75


More than once we encountered a line of musicians dancing single file down the center of the street, playing on their flutes and drums, perhaps on their way to a feast.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 87


The drums and flutes of the musicians sounded, and to my amazement the first girl, with a sudden, graceful swirl of her body lifted away her robes and flung them high over the heads of the guests to cries of delight.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 96


To one side, across a clearing from the fire, a bit in the background, was a group of nine musicians. They were not as yet playing, though one of them was absently tapping a rhythm on a small hand drum, the kaska; two others, with stringed instruments, were tuning them, putting their ears to the instruments. One of the instruments was an eight-stringed czehar, rather like a large flat oblong box; it is held across the lap when sitting cross-legged and is played with a horn pick; the other was the kalika, a six-stringed instrument; it, like the czehar, is flat-bridged and its strings are adjusted by means of small wooden cranks; on the other hand, it less resembles a low, flat box and suggests affinities to the banjo or guitar, though the sound box is hemispheric and the neck rather long; it, too, of course, like the czehar, is plucked; I have never seen a bowed instrument on Gor; also, I might mention, I have never on Gor seen any written music; I do not know if a notation exists; melodies are passed on from father to son, from master to apprentice. There was another kalika player, as well, but he was sitting there holding his instrument, watching the slave girls in the audience. The three flutists were polishing their instruments and talking together; it was shop talk I gathered, because one or the other would stop to illustrate some remark by a passage on his flute, and then one of the others would attempt to correct or improve on what he had done; occasionally their discussion grew heated. There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety, bits of metal on wires, gourds filled with pebbles, slave bells mounted on hand rings, and such. These various things, from time to time, would be used not only by himself but by others in the group, probably the second kaska player and the third flutist. Among Gorean musicians, incidentally, czehar players have the most prestige; there was only one in this group, I noted, and he was their leader; next follow the flutists and then the players of the kalika; the players of the drums come next; and the farthest fellow down the list is the man who keeps the bag of miscellaneous instruments, playing them and parceling them out to others as needed. Lastly it might be mentioned, thinking it is of some interest, musicians on Gor are never enslaved; they may, of course, be exiled, tortured, slain and such; it is said, perhaps truly, that he who makes music must, like the tarn and the Vosk gull, be free.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 153 - 154


Now that the sport was done some Musicians filed in, taking up positions to one side. There was a czehar player, two players of the kalika, four flutists and a pair of kaska drummers.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 88


A number of Musicians now filed out from the door at the foot of the block and took their places about it, sitting cross-legged on the floor. Those with string instruments began to tune them; there was a czehar player, the group's leader, some kalika players, some flutists, players of the kaska, small drums, and others. Each of these, in his way, prepared himself for the evening, sketching out melodies or sound patterns, lost with himself.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 291


The Taurentians had been disbanded, disgraced and exiled from the city. Only the day before their purple cloaks and helmets had been taken from them before the great gate; their swords had been broken and they had been conducted by common Warriors, to the music of flute girls, a pasang beyond the walls of Ar, and ordered from her environs.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Pages 392 - 393


Then the man with the drum of hollow rence root began to drum, and I heard some others join in with reed flutes, and one fellow had bits of metal, strung on a circular wire, and another a notched stick, played by scraping it with a flat spoon of rence root.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 45


The injured galley then is like a broken-winged bird, and at the mercy of the other ship's ram as she comes about, flutes playing and drums beating, and makes her strike amidships.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 137


Although I had had the masts, with their yards, taken down and lashed to the decks, and the sails stored below, I had the flutists and drummers, not uncommon on the ram-ships of Thassa, strike up a martial air.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 197


I listened for a while, chuckling, to the brave tunes being put forth by my flutists and drummers.

Then, when I saw the perimeter ships of the treasure fleet swinging about toward me, I motioned for the musicians to discontinue their performance.

When they were silent, I could hear the flutes and drums from the enemy ships.
. . .

Others, brief notes, interrogations, demands for clarification, were from my own ships. They had good commanders. I listened to the flutes and drums of the ram-ships of the treasure fleet.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 198


Rask clapped his hands once, and four musicians, who had been waiting outside, entered the tent, and took a place to one side. Two had small drums, one a flute, the other a stringed instrument.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 302


We heard the beating of a drum and the playing of flutes.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 48


Flanking the wagon, on both sides, were the musicians, with their drums and flutes. Behind the wagon, in the white robes, trimmed with gold and purple, of merchant magistrates, came five men. I recognized them as judges.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 49


The judges, I noted, had left. The musicians, those who had played the drums and flutes, escorting the judges and the prisoner, had also left.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 51


Her teacher was a cafe slave girl, Seleenya, rented from her master; her musicians were a flutist, hired early, and, later, a kaska player, to accompany him.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 102


Behind me, as I thrust apart the beads, I heard the pounding of the drum, the kaska, the silence, then the sound, as the flutist, his hands on her body, to the sound of the drum, instructed the girl in the line-length and intensity of one of the varieties of pre-abandonment pelvic thrusts.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 104


I turned from him with a rustle of bells, looking about me. The girl in the sand was quite good. It was still early in the evening, the sixteenth hour. She scarcely moved, swaying, ankles close, arms over her head, wrists back to back, palms turned out. Yet she subtly danced, controlled by the music of a single flute. Some men watched her. We had five dancers at the Belled Collar. I thought all were fine. The best would perform later in the evening. Four performed a day, and one would rest. I could not dance. There was only one musician at the side of the sand. Others would join him later. Their leader was Andronicus, who played the czehar.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 293


A skirl on a flute and a sudden pounding on twin tabors, small, hand drums, called my attention to the square of sand at the side of which sat the musicians.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 133


The man from the tavern of Filimbi, to which she had been sold after I had been taken from Schendi, some months ago, was but a few feet behind her. He had unleashed her that she might run to me. She still wore a brief work tunic from the tavern, with the sign of the tavern, a flute, on its back. Filimbi was the name of the proprietor, but it is also an inland word for flute.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 461


As we spoke some five musicians entered the room and took their places to one side. There was a czehar player, two flutists, a kalika player, and a player on the kaska, a small hand drum.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 277


Within the holding I could hear the sound of flutes, drums and kalikas. The melody, however, was slow and decorous.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 97


There were seven musicians, who furnished the music for the dancers, a czehar player, their leader, two kalika players, three flutists and a kaska player.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 234


The vanity of human beings is interesting. From my own point of view it seemed that Hci retained a great deal of what must once have been an unusual degree of savage handsomeness. The marking of his countenance, though surely not what a fellow would be likely to elect for cosmetic purposes, did not seem to me sufficiently serious to warrant his reaction to it. It might even have been regarded by some, as I have suggested, in the rude heraldry of the plains, as an enhancement to their appearance. Surely the maidens of the Isbu did not seem to find the mark objectionable. Many of them would have been much pleased had Hci, such a splendid warrior, deigned to pay them court. But no longer did Hci come to sit cross-legged outside their lodges, playing the love flute, to lure them forth under the Gorean moons.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 20 - 21


"If you wish to court Iwoso," said Bloketu, "you may come to the lodge tonight and sit outside, cross-legged, playing the love flute. I will then decide whether or not I will permit my maiden to leave the lodge."
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 84


"Cotanka," said he, "of the Wismahi." As is often the case with the names of the red savages they do not translate simply and directly into a different language. The expression 'cotanka' usually designates a fife or flute, but it may also be used more broadly to refer to any wind instrument whatsoever. Given the cultural milieu involved and the narrower understanding of that expression within that milieu perhaps the best translation, supplying connotations familiar to the red savages, might be 'Love Flute'.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 236 - 237


The drummer and the flautist prepared once more to play.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 142


This multiplicity of skills, incidentally, is not all that uncommon with players. Most of them, too, it seems, can do things like play the flute or kalika, sing, dance, tell jokes, and so on. They are generally versatile and talented people.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 175


Hendow gestured with his head to the musicians, and they made their way, one by one, through the beaded curtain. There were five of them, a czehar player, two kalika players, a flautist and a drummer. In a moment or two, as Mirus solicited further interest among the customers, I heard the sounds of the instruments, the czehar and kalikas being toned, the flautist trying passages, the drummer's fingers light on the taut skin of his instrument, the kaska, then adjusting it, then trying it again, then tapping lightly, then more vigorously, with swift, brief rhythms, limbering his wrists, fingers and hands. The music of Gor, or much of it, is very melodious and sensuous. Much of it seems made for the display of slaves before free men, but then, I suppose, that is exactly what it is made for.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 179 - 180


Suddenly in my dance it seemed I was a virgin, reluctant and fearful, terrified in the reality in which she found herself, but knowing she must respond to the music, to those heady, sensuous rhythms, to the wild cries of the flute, to the beating of the drum. I then danced timidity, and reluctance and inhibition, but yet reflecting, as one would, in such a situation, the commands of the music.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 194 - 195


I may have been mistaken, but I felt that men were looking at me. Perhaps they had noticed, too, the double flute on my master's back.
. . .

My master removed his long double flute from his back.

I braced myself for an instant.

He played then a set of annunciatory skirls.

I think that anyone in the square must have heard those sounds. He then, for two or three minutes, played soft, full, melodious tunes, sensuous, inviting tunes.
. . .

With the music of the double flute in the background I modestly removed the Ta-Teera, putting it to the side.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 283 - 284


At a party or convivial supper the host, or elected feast master, usually determines the proportions of water to wine. Unmixed wine, of course, may be drunk, for example, at the parties of young men, at which might appear dancers, flute slaves and such.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 70


I heard a swirl from a flute, the simple flute, not the double flute, and the quick pounding of a small tabor, these instruments now in the hands of Philebus' assistants.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 30


There was the sound of the flute and drum. There was the firelight, the men about, the enclosure, the Vosk in the background, the firelight and the slave.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 33


The two fellows who had supplied the music were silent. One wiped the flute, the other was addressing himself to the tabor, loosening some pegs, relaxing the tension of the drumhead. The drumhead is usually made of verrskin, as most often are wineskins.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 36


Philebus glanced at his fellows, and the one tried a short schedule of notes on the flute, the other retightened the pegs on the tabor.

Borton looked quizzically at the girl before him, so beautiful, and owned.

She did not meet his eyes.

"Let the melody be soft, and slow, and simple," said Philebus to the flutist, who nodded.

"May I speak, Master," asked Temione.

"Yes," said Philebus.

"May the melody also be," said she, "one in which a slave may be well displayed."

"A block melody?" asked the flutist, addressing his question to Philebus.

"No," said Philebus, "nothing so sensuous. Rather, say, the "Hope of Tina.""
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 37


I heard the sound of a tabor several yards away, and the swirl of a flute, and the clapping of hands.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 43


"You merely wish to observe the flute girls," he said.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 103


I could hear the flutes.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 112


"What do you wish here," he asked, "if you are not of Ar?"

"To see the progress of the works," I said.

He laughed. "And the flute girls?" he said.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 114


We could now hear the flute music quite clearly.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 117


Here and there upon the walls, among those working, were silked flute girls, sometimes sitting cross-legged on flat stones, rather even with or even below the heads of workers, sometimes perched cross-legged on large stones, above the heads of workers, sometimes moving about among the workers, sometimes strolling, playing, at other times turning and dancing. Some were also on the lower level, even on the Wall Road.

"Many of the flute girls seem pretty," said Marcus.

"Yes," I said. To be sure, we were rather far from them.

"It is a joke of Lurius of Jad, I gather," said Marcus, "that the walls of Ar should be torn down to the music of flute girls."

"I would think so," I said.

"What an extreme insult," he said.

"Yes," I said.

"You will note," he said, "that many of the girls sit cross-legged."

"Yes," I said.

"They should be beaten," he said.

"Yes," I said.
. . .

"Officially," I said, "the music of the flute girls is supposed to make the work more pleasant."
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Pages 118 - 119


On the wall, in the trough of the breach, we saw four men rolling a heavy stone toward the field side of the wall. A flute girl was parodying, or accompanying, their efforts on the flute, the instrument seeming to strain with them, and then, when they rolled the stone down, she played a skirl of descending notes on the flute, and, spinning about, danced away. The men laughed.

"I have seen enough," said Marcus.

There was suddenly near us, startling us, another skirl of notes on a flute, the common double flute. A flute girl, come apparently from the wall side of the Wall Road, danced tauntingly near us, to our right, and, with the flute, while playing, gestured toward the wall, as though encouraging us to join the others in their labor. I, and Marcus, I am sure, were angry. Not only had we been startled by the sudden, intrusive noise, which the girl must have understood would have been the case, but we resented the insinuation that we might be such as would of our own will join the work on the wall. Did she think we were of Ar, that we were of the conquered, the pacified, the confused and fooled, the verbally manipulated, the innocuous, the predictable, the tamed? She was an exciting brunet, in a short tunic of diaphanous silk. She was slender, and was probably kept on a carefully supervised diet by her master or trainer. Her dark eyes shone with amusement. She pranced before us, playing. She waved the flute again toward the wall.

We regarded her.

She again gestured, playing, toward the wall.

I had little doubt that she assumed from our appearance in this area that we were of Ar. We did not move. A gesture of annoyance crossed her lovely features. She played more determinedly, as though we might not understand her intent.

Still we did not move.

Then, angrily, she spun about, dancing, to return to her former post near the wall side of the Wall Road. She was attractive, even insolently so, at the moment, in the diaphanous silk.

"You have not been given permission to withdraw," I said, evenly.

She turned about, angrily, holding the flute.

"You are armed," she suddenly said, perhaps then for the first time really noting this homely fact.

"We are not of Ar," I said.

"Oh," she said, standing her ground, trembling a little.

"Are you accustomed to standing in the presence of free men?" I asked.

"I will kneel if it will please you," she said.

"If you not kneel," I said, "it is possible that I may be displeased."

She regarded me.

"Kneel," I said.

Swiftly she knelt.

I walked over to her and, taking her by the hair, twisting it, she crying out, turned her about and threw her to her belly on the Wall Road.

She sobbed in anger.

Marcus and I crouched near her.

"Oh!" she said.

"She is not in the iron belt," said Marcus.

"That is a further insult to those of Ar," I said, "that they would put unbelted flute girls among them."

"Yes," growled Marcus.

The tone of his voice, I am sure, did nothing to set our fair prisoner at ease. Flute girls, incidentally, when hired from their master, to entertain and serve at parties, are commonly unbelted, that for the convenience of the guests.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Pages 120 - 122


Things were then much as they had been before. Nothing had changed. To be sure, the work was not now being performed to the music of flute girls. Tomorrow, however, I did not doubt but what the flute girls would be back, and numerous guards in attendance, at least on the street.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 133


"Czehar music," she said, "and, later, the recitation of poetry by Milo, the famed actor, to the music of the double flute." The instrument which is played by the flute girls is a double flute, too, but I had little doubt that the player involved would not be a flute girl but someone associated with one or another of the theaters of Ar. Similarly the instrument would undoubtedly be far superior, in both range and tone, to those likely to be at the disposal of flute girls.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 156


Some twenty men, stripped, in heavy metal collars, these linked by heavy chains, their hands behind their backs, presumably manacled, prodded now and then by the butts of guards' spears, were approaching. Behind the line came a flute girl, sometimes turning about, playing the instrument. It was this sound we had heard. Some folks stopped to watch.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 165


We watched the coffle of prisoners move away, south on the Avenue of the Central Cylinder. For a long time we could hear the music of the flute girl who brought up the rear.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 166


*Twice in the manuscript, later, Cabot refers to a "Flute Street." From the context it seems clear that this is "Aulus." I have accordingly edited the manuscript in the interests of consistency, changing "Flute Street" to "Aulus." My interpretation is supported by information supplied by a colleague in the Classics Department, to the effect that there is a Greek expression for a flute which might be transliterated as aulos. I think we may assume then, apart from contextual considerations, that "Aulus" and "Flute Street" are the same street. My conjecture is that aulos was absorbed into Gorean as 'Aulus'. An additional consideration is that "Aulus" is one of the streets bordering the great theater, that of Pentilicus Tallux. Flute music is apparently extremely important in Gorean theater. Indeed, we learn from Cabot's miscellaneous notes that the name of the flute player usually occurs on theatrical advertisements immediately after that of the major performer or performers. It seems the flute player is often on stage and accompanies performers about, pointing up speeches, supplying background music and such. This is accepted as Gorean theatrical convention, it seems, much as background music is accepted in Twentieth Century films, even in such unlikely locations as city streets, airplanes, life rafts and deserts. Various "modes" are supposed, as well, to elicit and express various emotions, some being appropriate for love scenes, others for battle scenes, etc. Lastly it might be mentioned that 'Aulus' can also occur as a Gorean masculine name. This sort of thing is familiar, of course, in all languages, as Smith, Cooper, Chandler, Carpenter, Carter, and such, stand for occupations, and names like Hampshire, Lake, Holm, Rivers, and such, stand for places, and names like Stone, Hammer, Rock, and such, stand for things.
- J.N.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Pages 377 - 378


Similarly I was not versed in song, I was not skilled with lute or lyre, I did not even know the special dances of the gardens. It is one thing to writhe naked before guards, one's body obedient to the slightest tremor of the flute, and quite another, for example, to swirl in a belt of jewels on the dancing floor of one of the golden taverns, reached only from the high bridges. But then, perhaps, they are not really so different after all.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 55


In another place, within a rectangle of canvas walls, on a small stage, as the music of flutes and a czehar drifted upward, she saw acrobats, jugglers and fire-eaters.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 342


The music of czehars, flutes, and kalikas, from scattered bands of musicians, swirled throughout the gigantic festival camp, spread over pasangs. There was the pounding of tabors, too, speaking of excitement and the rousings of blood.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 389


There was a skirl of music from the musicians outside, to one side of the sand, flutes, czehars, two kalikas, a tabor.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 431


There was the music of flutes, and a tabor, and one kalika, and a slave, she of one of Peisistratus' men, stamped her feet, and turned, and danced in the firelight.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 667


"The slave! The slave!" he heard, from the group about the fire. Too, he heard the flute skirl an invitation.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 675


The tabor joined the flute, and then, suddenly, too, the kalika.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 676


And many sang, and congratulated themselves on their newly found virtue, while dismantling their walls to the scornful music of flute girls.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 112


"And the flute girls who so tormented and mocked the earlier dismantlers of the walls?" I asked.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 118


I had seen them dancing in the firelight, in camps, to the rhythms of the czehar, the kalika, the flute, and tabor.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 363


The walls of Ar, mightier even than those of southern Turia, were dismantled by duped, rejoicing citizens to the music of flute girls, and betrayed, fallen Ar would be systematically looted and exploited for months.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 13


I had attended, as a guardsman, many of her fetes and banquets, and had attended her, and others, at the theater, at concerts, and song dramas. Her regalia had been complex and sumptuous, rich and colorful, the envy of every free woman in the city, each pleat and fold carefully arranged by slaves; her slippers had been laced with pearls, her veils had shimmered with jewels. Cast flowers and sprinkled perfumes, drummers and flautists, preceded her chair, borne by mighty slaves, flanked by liveried guardsmen.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 378


Indeed, he may often bring in rent slaves from the party houses to sing and dance for him, and his guests, to play the kalika, to accompany with flute music the measuring of wine and the cutting of meat.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 469


"I thought of myself, frequently enough, as a property, as owned, as a girl who must unquestioningly, fearfully, obey masters, who might dance for their pleasure, about campfires in lonely places, on streets in shabby districts, to a master's flute, on the decks of galleys, to the clapping of hands, on the floor of taverns, to music, silks swirling, bangles clashing, to shouts, to hands reaching for me, to the clash of goblets and the spilling of drink, to the cries of aroused men, pleased to look upon me as I would then be, a vulnerable, helpless slave, desperate to be found pleasing."
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 572


"Weeks went by," she said. "Then it was noticed one evening that the blinded beast was turning about, and moving, in time to the carnival music, when the kaiila were performing, and later, the striped urts. This was brought to the attention of the owner, the chief trainer, who brought a flautist to the vicinity of the cage, and, behold, the beast danced to the music of the flute. Thereafter this was one of the attractions in the carnival.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 255


Usually, of course, they would be in the company of their masters, or, say, keepers, if they might be returning late from feasts, serving slaves, flute slaves, kalika slaves, brothel girls, dancers, or such.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 258


I knew that a yearning slave, to one side lying in her chains, must often await the outcome of such a game There was music in the tavern, a czehar player, a drummer, utilizing the small tabor, two flautists, and a pair of kalika players. He with the czehar was the leader. That was common, as I was given to understand.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 346


Normally this would take place only at private parties for high-spirited males, rash, reckless, rowdy fellows, garlanded revelers, the sort of parties at which one might encounter flute girls, slave dancers, and such.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 410


Why should they, out here in the forest, be discussing tunes, czehars, flutes, kalikas, and such?
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 371 - 372


I imagined her, exhibited naked on the block, in chains, dancing to the flute and tabor, to the snap of the auctioneer's whip her belly promising untold pleasure to the master who would buy her.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 446


I saw the miller's man approaching, with his basket of grain, followed by the dark-haired flute girl. He set his ladder against the stone, climbed the ladder, and poured the grain into the cavity within the stone. He then withdrew, setting the ladder aside, and disappeared, with his basket, returning to the receiving house, where grain was brought and weighed, and records kept. The flute girl then climbed to her perch, or platform, on the side, and sat upon it, her legs dangling over the edge. She, too, was camisked, and wore the mill collar. Shortly thereafter the switch slave, a large, strong woman, similarly camisked, arrived, her switch in hand. About her forehead was bound a broad, yellow fillet, from the wool of the bounding hurt. This held back her hair, of course, but its significance, in her case, was considerable. It was a talmit, indicative of rank. She was first girl in the mill yard. The flute girl began to play, and we dug in our feet and pressed our weight against the spokelike poles by means of which the stone was turned. With a heavy, grinding, sound, one we knew well, the heavy, conical stone began to rotate slowly on the thick, flat, circular, platelike stone from which the troughs descended. It was not unusual on this world, incidentally, for many activities to be accompanied by music which, on my former world, would not be likely to be so accompanied. Needless to say, I found this surprising. Warriors might perform martial exercises to music, in the manner of Pyrrhic dances, advancing, withdrawing, wheeling about, and such, brandishing weaponry; athletes might train to music; sa-tarna might be harvested to music; grain might be threshed to music, galleys might be rowed to music, and so on. Similarly, work songs are common in the fields. Warriors might sing battle hymns while moving to engage the enemy. Girls may sing at the looms, and at the potting wheels.

Once, I had heard, the walls of a great city, Ar, defeated in war, had been dismantled, to the music of flute girls.

Doubtless music has many practical applications. It might serve to coordinate activities it might serve to hearten; to inspirit, and lift hearts; it might be intended to seemingly shorten hours and lighten labors, and so on. The tunes played by our flute girl were not lively, of course, for one does not turn a stone with grace and sprightliness, but were measured to our tread, as we thrust against the poles. Sometimes, when we were resting, leaning on the poles, she would play as she wished. She was quite skilled. I wanted to tear her hair out.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 142


Most flute girls, as those who play the kalika, are slaves, as are most dancers. Most are owned by small companies, from which they may be rented. They are popular at dinners, small parties, banquets, symposiums, and such. They are usually attractive, and are rented for the night.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 143


The ka-la-nas were sparkling and mild, not the sort of coarse ka-la-nas commonly diluted in the wine crater, to a proportion agreed upon by guests, which only wild young men would be likely to drink unmixed, hailing one another with frightful jokes and bawdy songs, awaiting the arrival of the dancers and musicians, the drummers, the flute and kalika girls.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 160


I saw, centrally, a circle of sand, which, I supposed, was dancing sand. There were cushions to the side, probably for musicians. The accompaniment for a dancer can vary considerably, from as little as a single flute, often the case with a street dancer, to several individuals and a variety of instruments. A typical group would consist of a czehar player, usually the leader, one or two flautists, one or two players of the kalika, and a taborist.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 263


At that moment there was, from beyond the leather curtain, the sudden skirl of a flute, the swift strumming of a kalika, and the pounding of the tabor.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 272


"If it were night, indoors," said Kurik, "I would suppose any number of things, depending on the house, music, the kalika and czehar, the aulus and tabor, acrobats, jugglers, flute girls, eaters of fire, the reading of poetry the chanting of histories, professional tellers of stories, the singing and dancing of slaves, many things."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 529


We prepared to proceed when the door to the exchange house swung open, and two fellows emerged. During the moment the door was ajar, I saw lamps within, and some men milling about. Two held goblets, probably of paga. There was also a screen. I heard some music, a czehar tabor, and flute. I could not see the musicians.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 654


The ambiance of our journey suddenly changed, as he who carried me turned to the left. I heard the swinging of the leaves of a door, and then conversation, and the clink of goblets. A flute was playing somewhere inside.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 71


Later the czehar player would be joined by his fellows, two with kalikas, two with flutes, and one on the tabor. The czehar player was the leader of the group. That seems to be common.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 123


I also passed two stalls, in one of which a fellow was exhibiting drawings, paintings, carvings, and small pieces of metal artwork, while in the other a man was offering kaissa sets, cards, and dice for sale, displayed on a table, while, behind him, arranged on hooks and shelves, oddly enough, were flutes, tabors, and kalikas.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 140


The musicians arrived and took their places at the side of the dancing floor. There was a czehar player, two flutists, and a drummer, with the small tabor. They were followed by the taverner's man who had gone to fetch them. "There are no dancers," said the czehar player, who was the leader of the small group. "Ianthe and Aglaia are unavailable."
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 425









 


Gourds Filled with Pebbles
To The Top



There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety, bits of metal on wires, gourds filled with pebbles,
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 153 - 154









 


Horagai
To The Top



A blast was blown, this on a large conch trumpet.

This trumpet is called a horagai. It is sometimes used in Pani warfare as a battle horn, a signaling device to regulate the movements of troops. I had trained the cavalry, it might be recalled, to respond to the notes of such a device, a war horn. These, however, in the usual Gorean fashion, were formed of metal.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 503 - 504









 


Horns
To The Top



The serpent took its way between the cliffs, looming high on each side. Ivar Forkbeard, at the prow, lifted a great, curved bronze horn and blew a blast. I heard it echo among the cliffs. Amidships, crowded together, standing, facing the starboard side of the vessel, were the bond-maids and Aelgifu. She wore still her black velvet. They were in throat coffle; their wrists were fettered before their bodies. They looked upon the new country, harsh, forbidding, which was to be their home.

I heard, perhaps from a pasang away, up the inlet, between the cliffs, the winding of a horn.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 80


Again Ivar Forkbeard winded the great bronze horn. In several seconds an answering blast echoed between the cliffs.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


I was jostled by a fellow blowing on a horn.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 39









 


Kalika
To The Top



To one side, across a clearing from the fire, a bit in the background, was a group of nine musicians. They were not as yet playing, though one of them was absently tapping a rhythm on a small hand drum, the kaska; two others, with stringed instruments, were tuning them, putting their ears to the instruments. One of the instruments was an eight-stringed czehar, rather like a large flat oblong box; it is held across the lap when sitting cross-legged and is played with a horn pick; the other was the kalika, a six-stringed instrument; it, like the czehar, is flat-bridged and its strings are adjusted by means of small wooden cranks; on the other hand, it less resembles a low, flat box and suggests affinities to the banjo or guitar, though the sound box is hemispheric and the neck rather long; it, too, of course, like the czehar, is plucked; I have never seen a bowed instrument on Gor; also, I might mention, I have never on Gor seen any written music; I do not know if a notation exists; melodies are passed on from father to son, from master to apprentice. There was another kalika player, as well, but he was sitting there holding his instrument, watching the slave girls in the audience. The three flutists were polishing their instruments and talking together; it was shop talk I gathered, because one or the other would stop to illustrate some remark by a passage on his flute, and then one of the others would attempt to correct or improve on what he had done; occasionally their discussion grew heated. There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety, bits of metal on wires, gourds filled with pebbles, slave bells mounted on hand rings, and such. These various things, from time to time, would be used not only by himself but by others in the group, probably the second kaska player and the third flutist. Among Gorean musicians, incidentally, czehar players have the most prestige; there was only one in this group, I noted, and he was their leader; next follow the flutists and then the players of the kalika; the players of the drums come next; and the farthest fellow down the list is the man who keeps the bag of miscellaneous instruments, playing them and parceling them out to others as needed. Lastly it might be mentioned, thinking it is of some interest, musicians on Gor are never enslaved; they may, of course, be exiled, tortured, slain and such; it is said, perhaps truly, that he who makes music must, like the tarn and the Vosk gull, be free.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 153 - 154


Now that the sport was done some Musicians filed in, taking up positions to one side. There was a czehar player, two players of the kalika, four flutists and a pair of kaska drummers.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 88


He had finished his gruel but he was sitting there listening to a slave girl, sitting on furs between the tables, playing a kalika. Several of the guards and staff had left the tables, retiring. Even the girls at the wall had been unchained and returned, after the evening's sport, to their cells. Phyllis and Virginia, and Elizabeth, had long since left the hall. Ho-Tu was fond of the music of the kalika, a six-stringed, plucked instrument, with a hemispheric sound box and long neck. Sura, I knew, played the instrument. Elizabeth, Virginia and Phyllis had been shown its rudiments, as well as something about the lyre, but they had not been expected to become proficient, nor were they given the time to become so; if their master, at a later date, after their sale, wished his girls to possess these particular attributes, which are seldom involved in the training of slave girls, he himself could pay for their instruction; the time of the girls, I noted, was rather fully occupied, without spending hours a day on music. The slave girl sitting on the furs, for the kalika is played either sitting or standing, bent over her instrument, her hair falling over the neck of it, lost in her music, a gentle, slow melody, rather sad. I had heard it sung some two years ago by the bargemen on the Cartius, a tributary of the Vosk, far to the south and west of Ar. Ho-Tu's eyes were closed. The horn spoon lay to the side of the empty gruel bowl. The girl had begun to hum the melody now, and Ho-Tu, almost inaudibly, but I could hear him, hummed it as well.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 207


"Caste sanctuary!" again pleaded Portus, on his knees before the table of Cernus. The girl with the kalika had lightly fled from between the tables.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 208


I turned about to examine the room. There were several chests there, doubtless containing silks, cosmetics, jewelry; there were also rich furs, on which I gathered she slept; in one corner there leaned a six-stringed kalika, long-necked, with its hemispheric sound box; I knew she played the instrument; on one wall, some feet away, hanging over a hook, I saw her slave goad.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 250


"Does Ho-Tu visit you often?" I asked.

"Yes," said she. "I play the kalika for him. He cares for its sound."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 253


I, glancing about once again, saw the kalika in the corner.

"Would you like me to play for you?" asked Sura.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 254


"I do not suppose you would care to play the kalika," I proposed.

"No! No!" she cried. "The game! The game!"
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 256


I tipped my Ubar, resigning.

She clapped her hands delightedly.

"Wouldn't you like to play the kalika?" I asked, hopefully.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 257


Ho-Tu spoke to her. "I will play with you, if you like," he said.

"No, Ho-Tu," said she. "I would not like that." Then she left his arms, to pick up the kalika in the corner of her quarters. Smiling at him she then returned to the center of the compartment and sat down, cross-legged, for the instrument is commonly played that way, and bent over it. Her fingers touched the six strings, a note at a time, and then a melody, of the caravans of Tor, a song of love.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 264


A number of Musicians now filed out from the door at the foot of the block and took their places about it, sitting cross-legged on the floor. Those with string instruments began to tune them; there was a czehar player, the group's leader, some kalika players, some flutists, players of the kaska, small drums, and others. Each of these, in his way, prepared himself for the evening, sketching out melodies or sound patterns, lost with himself.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 291


As we spoke some five musicians entered the room and took their places to one side. There was a czehar player, two flutists, a kalika player, and a player on the kaska, a small hand drum.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 277


Within the holding I could hear the sound of flutes, drums and kalikas. The melody, however, was slow and decorous.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 97


There were seven musicians, who furnished the music for the dancers, a czehar player, their leader, two kalika players, three flutists and a kaska player. Tasdron kindly had brought these fellows from his tavern.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 234


"Such skills would seem to have a very low priority," he said. "For example, can you play the kalika?"

"No," I said.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 442


Most of them, too, it seems, can do things like play the flute or kalika, sing, dance, tell jokes, and so on. They are generally versatile and talented people.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 175


Hendow gestured with his head to the musicians, and they made their way, one by one, through the beaded curtain. There were five of them, a czehar player, two kalika players, a flautist and a drummer. In a moment or two, as Mirus solicited further interest among the customers, I heard the sounds of the instruments, the czehar and kalikas being toned, the flautist trying passages, the drummer's fingers light on the taut skin of his instrument, the kaska, then adjusting it, then trying it again, then tapping lightly, then more vigorously, with swift, brief rhythms, limbering his wrists, fingers and hands. The music of Gor, or much of it, is very melodious and sensuous. Much of it seems made for the display of slaves before free men, but then, I suppose, that is exactly what it is made for.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 179 - 180


"To be sure," he said, "you cannot play the kalika, nor do you know the dances of the yearning, begging slave girl."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 68


The music of czehars, flutes, and kalikas, from scattered bands of musicians, swirled throughout the gigantic festival camp, spread over pasangs. There was the pounding of tabors, too, speaking of excitement and the rousings of blood.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 389


There was a skirl of music from the musicians outside, to one side of the sand, flutes, czehars, two kalikas, a tabor.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 431


With a swirl from the czehar and kalikas, and a pounding of the tabors, the dancers prostrated themselves in the sand, as slaves, and then, as Peisistratus struck his hands sharply together, they leapt up, and fled from the room, exiting through a portal, it curtained with dangling strands of blue and yellow beads, the caste colors of the slavers.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 164


The dancer was now kneeling in the sand, her head bowed, waiting for the first strumming of the kalika. She was nicely silked, in the diaphanous dancing silks of Gor. Her hair, long and dark, fell to the sand.
. . .

A whispering sentence of notes emanated from the kalika, and the dancer rose gracefully to her feet, her knees flexed, her head still bowed, her hands at her thighs.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 165


There was the music of flutes, and a tabor, and one kalika, and a slave, she of one of Peisistratus' men, stamped her feet, and turned, and danced in the firelight. Bangles clashed upon her bared ankles. It is beautiful to see a slave dancing in the firelight.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 667


The tabor joined the flute, and then, suddenly, too, the kalika.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 676


I had seen them, serving quietly, demurely, in their masters' houses; I had seen them dancing in the firelight, in camps, to the rhythms of the czehar, the kalika, the flute, and tabor.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 363


Indeed, he may often bring in rent slaves from the party houses to sing and dance for him, and his guests, to play the kalika, to accompany with flute music the measuring of wine and the cutting of meat.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 469


"Do you know how to play the kalika?" I asked.

"No, Master."
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 571


Well now was I aware of how I might have responded had they been concerned less to routinely open a young slave and had they been more patient, slower, less merciful. What if they had been tortuously slow, reading my body, playing upon it, as on a czehar or kalika bringing forth what music they wished?
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 109


He is concerned with her appearance. In the promenades she must look well on her leash. Perhaps he will have her taught the kalika or dance, dance such as is appropriate for such as she, slave dance.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 110


Usually, of course, they would be in the company of their masters, or, say, keepers, if they might be returning late from feasts, serving slaves, flute slaves, kalika slaves, brothel girls, dancers, or such.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 258


I knew that a yearning slave, to one side lying in her chains, must often await the outcome of such a game There was music in the tavern, a czehar player, a drummer, utilizing the small tabor, two flautists, and a pair of kalika players. He with the czehar was the leader. That was common, as I was given to understand.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 346


"You are not in a rich man's house, a pleasure garden, the palace of a Ubar," said Relia, "with little to do but sing and play the kalika."

"More likely," said another, "with little to do until it was time to adorn your master's slave ring."

"I do not know how to sing and play the kalika," I said.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 199


Why should they, out here in the forest, be discussing tunes, czehars, flutes, kalikas, and such?
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 371 - 372


Most flute girls, as those who play the kalika, are slaves, as are most dancers. Most are owned by small companies, from which they may be rented. They are popular at dinners, small parties, banquets, symposiums, and such. They are usually attractive, and are rented for the night.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 143


The supper was pleasant and genteel, suitable for a quiet evening with friends. Nothing was boisterous or rowdy. The ka-la-nas were sparkling and mild, not the sort of coarse ka-la-nas commonly diluted in the wine crater, to a proportion agreed upon by guests, which only wild young men would be likely to drink unmixed, hailing one another with frightful jokes and bawdy songs, awaiting the arrival of the dancers and musicians, the drummers, the flute and kalika girls.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 160


After the better part of the Ahn, we had doubtless entered one of the gates of Brundisium, as I then heard the cries of vendors, the rolling of wheels, the snorting of draft beasts, the sounds of men, music, a kalika, from somewhere.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 223


I saw, centrally, a circle of sand, which, I supposed, was dancing sand. There were cushions to the side, probably for musicians. The accompaniment for a dancer can vary considerably, from as little as a single flute, often the case with a street dancer, to several individuals and a variety of instruments. A typical group would consist of a czehar player, usually the leader, one or two flautists, one or two players of the kalika, and a taborist.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 263


At that moment there was, from beyond the leather curtain, the sudden skirl of a flute, the swift strumming of a kalika, and the pounding of the tabor.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 272


He could play the body of a slave, producing a rapture of sensations, much as the master of the czehar or kalika can play his lovely instrument, drawing forth its laughter and tears, its moans and cries, its pensive contemplations, its incitements and ardors, its valleys and mountains, its depths and its ecstasies.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 274


"If it were night, indoors," said Kurik, "I would suppose any number of things, depending on the house, music, the kalika and czehar, the aulus and tabor, acrobats, jugglers, flute girls, eaters of fire, the reading of poetry the chanting of histories, professional tellers of stories, the singing and dancing of slaves, many things."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 529


Yesterday, one of oarsmen, in camp, had strummed a stringed instrument, a kalika.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 85


No dancer was now performing. Later the czehar player would be joined by his fellows, two with kalikas, two with flutes, and one on the tabor. The czehar player was the leader of the group. That seems to be common.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 123


I also passed two stalls, in one of which a fellow was exhibiting drawings, paintings, carvings, and small pieces of metal artwork, while in the other a man was offering kaissa sets, cards, and dice for sale, displayed on a table, while, behind him, arranged on hooks and shelves, oddly enough, were flutes, tabors, and kalikas.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 140


And you, Zia, an ignorant barbarian, untutored and illiterate. Were you to dance, you would be whipped from the floor. You cannot play the kalika. You are bereft of songs. What is to be said for you other than the fact that you, like Euphrosyne, look well in a collar, and obviously belong in one?"
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 409









 


Kaska
To The Top



To one side, across a clearing from the fire, a bit in the background, was a group of nine musicians. They were not as yet playing, though one of them was absently tapping a rhythm on a small hand drum, the kaska; two others, with stringed instruments, were tuning them, putting their ears to the instruments. One of the instruments was an eight-stringed czehar, rather like a large flat oblong box; it is held across the lap when sitting cross-legged and is played with a horn pick; the other was the kalika, a six-stringed instrument; it, like the czehar, is flat-bridged and its strings are adjusted by means of small wooden cranks; on the other hand, it less resembles a low, flat box and suggests affinities to the banjo or guitar, though the sound box is hemispheric and the neck rather long; it, too, of course, like the czehar, is plucked; I have never seen a bowed instrument on Gor; also, I might mention, I have never on Gor seen any written music; I do not know if a notation exists; melodies are passed on from father to son, from master to apprentice. There was another kalika player, as well, but he was sitting there holding his instrument, watching the slave girls in the audience. The three flutists were polishing their instruments and talking together; it was shop talk I gathered, because one or the other would stop to illustrate some remark by a passage on his flute, and then one of the others would attempt to correct or improve on what he had done; occasionally their discussion grew heated. There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety, bits of metal on wires, gourds filled with pebbles, slave bells mounted on hand rings, and such. These various things, from time to time, would be used not only by himself but by others in the group, probably the second kaska player and the third flutist. Among Gorean musicians, incidentally, czehar players have the most prestige; there was only one in this group, I noted, and he was their leader; next follow the flutists and then the players of the kalika; the players of the drums come next; and the farthest fellow down the list is the man who keeps the bag of miscellaneous instruments, playing them and parceling them out to others as needed. Lastly it might be mentioned, thinking it is of some interest, musicians on Gor are never enslaved; they may, of course, be exiled, tortured, slain and such; it is said, perhaps truly, that he who makes music must, like the tarn and the Vosk gull, be free.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 153 - 154


Now that the sport was done some Musicians filed in, taking up positions to one side. There was a czehar player, two players of the kalika, four flutists and a pair of kaska drummers.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 88


A number of Musicians now filed out from the door at the foot of the block and took their places about it, sitting cross-legged on the floor. Those with string instruments began to tune them; there was a czehar player, the group's leader, some kalika players, some flutists, players of the kaska, small drums, and others. Each of these, in his way, prepared himself for the evening, sketching out melodies or sound patterns, lost with himself.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 291


Her teacher was a cafe slave girl, Seleenya, rented from her master; her musicians were a flutist, hired early, and, later, a kaska player, to accompany him.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 102


Behind me, as I thrust apart the beads, I heard the pounding of the drum, the kaska, the silence, then the sound, as the flutist, his hands on her body, to the sound of the drum, instructed the girl in the line-length and intensity of one of the varieties of pre-abandonment pelvic thrusts.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 104


As we spoke some five musicians entered the room and took their places to one side. There was a czehar player, two flutists, a kalika player, and a player on the kaska, a small hand drum.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 277


There were seven musicians, who furnished the music for the dancers, a czehar player, their leader, two kalika players, three flutists and a kaska player.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 234


Hendow gestured with his head to the musicians, and they made their way, one by one, through the beaded curtain. There were five of them, a czehar player, two kalika players, a flautist and a drummer. In a moment or two, as Mirus solicited further interest among the customers, I heard the sounds of the instruments, the czehar and kalikas being toned, the flautist trying passages, the drummer's fingers light on the taut skin of his instrument, the kaska, then adjusting it, then trying it again, then tapping lightly, then more vigorously, with swift, brief rhythms, limbering his wrists, fingers and hands. The music of Gor, or much of it, is very melodious and sensuous. Much of it seems made for the display of slaves before free men, but then, I suppose, that is exactly what it is made for.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 179 - 180


I extended my hands to the sides, to various sides, as though pleading for mercy, to be released from the imperatives of the music, but then reacted, drawing back, as though I had seen the sight of whips or weapons. The kaska player, alert to this, reduced the volume of his drumming, and then, five times, smote hard upon the taut skin, almost like the cracking of a whip, to which I reacted, turning to one side and another, as though such a disciplinary device had been sounded menacingly, on all sides, in my vicinity, and then I continued to dance, helpless before the will of masters.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 195









 


Leather Shield
To The Top



I could hear the slave bells, the song of Ute and the men, their clapping, the slapped rhythm on the leather shield.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 116


I tried to struggle. I heard the bells of Lana, the singing and clapping of Ute and the men, the slapping of the rhythm of Lana's dance on the leather of the shield.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 117









 


Lute
To The Top



I heard the music of a lute from somewhere.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 114


I could now see the girl playing the lute. She was lovely, as were the others. She was strolling about one of the pools. Two other girls, I now saw, were lying by the pool, putting their fingers in the water, making circles in the water.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 115


"This red-haired beauty," called the auctioneer, "is a catch of Captain Thrasymedes. She can play the lute."
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 79


"You have free women in mind," she asked, "perhaps lute players."
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 156


Similarly I was not versed in song, I was not skilled with lute or lyre, I did not even know the special dances of the gardens.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 55


Some girls, she knew, were taught to sing, others to entertain with instruments such as the lute and lyre, and others, it seemed, many, were trained in the dances of slaves.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 151


"Can you play a stringed musical instrument, a lyre, a lute, a samisen?"
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 210









 


Lyre
To The Top



She clapped her hands with delight. "It was I," she continued, "who apprehended and challenged him, I who saw the lyre beneath his gray robes and knew him for a singer.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 105


Ho-Tu was fond of the music of the kalika, a six-stringed, plucked instrument, with a hemispheric sound box and long neck. Sura, I knew, played the instrument. Elizabeth, Virginia and Phyllis had been shown its rudiments, as well as something about the lyre, but they had not been expected to become proficient, nor were they given the time to become so; if their master, at a later date, after their sale, wished his girls to possess these particular attributes, which are seldom involved in the training of slave girls, he himself could pay for their instruction; the time of the girls, I noted, was rather fully occupied, without spending hours a day on music.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 207


He wore the robes of his caste, the singers, and it was not known what city was his own. Many of the singers wander from place to place, selling their songs for bread and love. I had known, long ago, a singer, whose name was Andreas of Tor.
We could hear the torches crackle now, and the singer touched his lyre.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 225


We did have two pairs to be sold tonight, one consisting of a singer and her lyre player, and another of identical twins, from the island of Tabor, named for its resemblance to the small Gorean drum of that name.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 430


Earlier, as a portion of our entertainment, she had played on the lyre, and sung for us. She had been warmly applauded, which, I think, pleased muchly both the shy slave and her master. Miles of Vonda had had her trained in these skills.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 232


Miles of Vonda then picked up the lyre, which she had used earlier in entertaining us. With its strap he slung the small, lovely, curved, stringed instrument about her body, the strap over her right shoulder, the instrument behind her left hip. The delicacy of the instrument, with its suggestion of refinement, gentility and civilization, contrasted nicely with the barbarity of her luscious, enslaved nudity, the shreds of her tunic and her helpless, steel-clasped wrists.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 270


On the street, below, at the foot of the stairs, he ordered her to precede him. She then did so, well exposed in the shreds of the tunic, the delicate lyre slung behind her left hip, her wrists fastened behind her, with Gorean efficiency, in her master's steel.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 272


Similarly I was not versed in song, I was not skilled with lute or lyre, I did not even know the special dances of the gardens.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 55


Some girls, she knew, were taught to sing, others to entertain with instruments such as the lute and lyre, and others, it seemed, many, were trained in the dances of slaves.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 151


And doubtless millions of female slaves have been picked out for others, matched to others, to the best of the purchaser's ability, a slave who sings and recites, and plays the lyre, for a fellow who loves poetry and music,
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 681


"Can you play a stringed musical instrument, a lyre, a lute, a samisen?"

"No," she said.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 210


Of the first Alcinoë suggested that her value might be improved, if she could play the lyre. Of the second, Alcinoë wondered if slavers might be more interested in her, if she could dance.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 341









 


Notched Sticks
To The Top



To one side, across a clearing from the fire, a bit in the background, was a group of nine musicians. They were not as yet playing, though one of them was absently tapping a rhythm on a small hand drum, the kaska; two others, with stringed instruments, were tuning them, putting their ears to the instruments. One of the instruments was an eight-stringed czehar, rather like a large flat oblong box; it is held across the lap when sitting cross-legged and is played with a horn pick; the other was the kalika, a six-stringed instrument; it, like the czehar, is flat-bridged and its strings are adjusted by means of small wooden cranks; on the other hand, it less resembles a low, flat box and suggests affinities to the banjo or guitar, though the sound box is hemispheric and the neck rather long; it, too, of course, like the czehar, is plucked; I have never seen a bowed instrument on Gor; also, I might mention, I have never on Gor seen any written music; I do not know if a notation exists; melodies are passed on from father to son, from master to apprentice. There was another kalika player, as well, but he was sitting there holding his instrument, watching the slave girls in the audience. The three flutists were polishing their instruments and talking together; it was shop talk I gathered, because one or the other would stop to illustrate some remark by a passage on his flute, and then one of the others would attempt to correct or improve on what he had done; occasionally their discussion grew heated. There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety, bits of metal on wires, gourds filled with pebbles, slave bells mounted on hand rings, and such. These various things, from time to time, would be used not only by himself but by others in the group, probably the second kaska player and the third flutist. Among Gorean musicians, incidentally, czehar players have the most prestige; there was only one in this group, I noted, and he was their leader; next follow the flutists and then the players of the kalika; the players of the drums come next; and the farthest fellow down the list is the man who keeps the bag of miscellaneous instruments, playing them and parceling them out to others as needed. Lastly it might be mentioned, thinking it is of some interest, musicians on Gor are never enslaved; they may, of course, be exiled, tortured, slain and such; it is said, perhaps truly, that he who makes music must, like the tarn and the Vosk gull, be free.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 153 - 154


Then the man with the drum of hollow rence root began to drum, and I heard some others join in with reed flutes, and one fellow had bits of metal, strung on a circular wire, and another a notched stick, played by scraping it with a flat spoon of rence root.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 45









 


Percussion Variety
To The Top



There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety,
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 153









 


Pipes
To The Top



From behind three or four of the low tables, to the left of the counter, a band of sweating musicians sat happily cross-legged on the rug, somehow producing from those unlikely pipes and strings and drums and disks and wires the ever intriguing, wild, enchanting beautiful barbaric melodies of Gor.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Pages 223 - 224


I heard a drummer testing his instrument. I heard, too, some pipes.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 415


There was much cheering, and waving, and calling out, between the pier and the railing. Drums and pipes on board the Tais sounded.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 429


The drums and pipes aboard the Tais were sounding. There was other music, too, here and there, from the piers, greeting other ships.
. . .

In a few moments, then, to drums and pipes, and cheers, I saw Aemilianus, unsupported, but obviously weak, make his own way down the gangplank.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 432









 


Rattles
To The Top



Cancega, then, began a slow, shuffling dance. Two others, near him, also with roaches of feathers, shaking rattles, joined him. The focal point of this dance, which wove back and forth, in a fanlike motion, before it, was a high, white-barked tree. Cancega repeated, over and over, carrying the medicine wand, and dancing, "It is the tree." The other two fellows, who had joined him, with the rattles, would add a refrain, "It is tall and straight." This refrain, too, was sometimes echoed by those about us.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 35


Winyela then heard the rattles behind her, giving her her rhythm. These rattles were then joined by the firing of whistles, shrill and high, formed from the wing bones of the taloned Herlit.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 40


Suddenly we heard the shaking of rattles, the beating of small hand drums. The Yellow Knives opened their lines.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 263









 


Samisen
To The Top



"Can you play a stringed musical instrument, a lyre, a lute, a samisen?"

"No," she said.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 210


What Pani, at least of noble birth and refinement, would burn a well-wrought fan, a samisen, a lovely painted screen, or a poem?
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 54









 


Scent-Producer
To The Top



For example, does a Priest-King have the same qualitative experience that I do when we are confronted by the same scent? I am inclined to doubt it, for their music, which consists of rhapsodies of odors produced by instruments constructed for this purpose, and often played by Priest-Kings, some of whom I am told are far more skillful than others, is intolerable to my ear, or I should say, nose.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 78


The antennae of the thousand Priest-Kings seemed almost motionless so intent were they on the beauties of the music.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 213


As the musicians continued to produce their rhapsodic, involute rhythms of aroma on the scent-producer, one Priest-King at a time, one after the other, would slowly stalk forward and approach the Platform of the Mother.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 214


But I now understood as I observed the slight, almost enraptured tremor of their antennae responding to the scent-music of the musicians that this was not a simple demonstration of their patience but a time of exaltation for them, of gathering, of bringing the Nest together, of reminding them of their common, remote origins and their long, shared history, of reminding them of their very being and nature, of what they perhaps alone in all the universe were Priest-Kings.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 215


Together, in silence to human ears but to the swelling intensities of scent-music, in stately, stalking procession the two Priest-Kings approached the Mother, and I saw Misk, first, dip his mouth to the great golden bowl on its tripod and then approach her.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 216


The scent-music suddenly stopped and the Priest-Kings seemed to rustle as though an unseen wind had suddenly stirred the leaves of autumn and I heard even the surprised jangling of those tiny metal tools.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 217









 


Slave Bells Mounted On Hand Rings
To The Top



There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine; and several other instruments of a percussion variety, bits of metal on wires, gourds filled with pebbles, slave bells mounted on hand rings,
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 153 - 154









 


Slaves Bodies
To The Top



I looked back at Janice who, hands tied behind her back, fastened in the coffle, lay on her side. I smiled. I think there is no music more pleasing to a man's ears than the moans of a yielding slave girl.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 424


Men, the arrogant, masterful beasts, thought Ellen, biting her lip, grinding her fingernails into the palms of her hands. How vulnerable we are! How they make us theirs! They play us like czehars, drawing what music they will from our bodies!
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 412


Well now was I aware of how I might have responded had they been concerned less to routinely open a young slave and had they been more patient, slower, less merciful. What if they had been tortuously slow, reading my body, playing upon it, as on a czehar or kalika bringing forth what music they wished?
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 109


The Gorean master does not request or petition but owns and takes. He handles his slave with assurance and authority, sometimes treating her as though she were in a bit and harness, and other times as though she were a vibrating, responding musical instrument from which he draws our tunes, tiny whimpers, soft moans, and cries, as he wishes.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Pages 100 - 101


He could play the body of a slave, producing a rapture of sensations, much as the master of the czehar or kalika can play his lovely instrument, drawing forth its laughter and tears, its moans and cries, its pensive contemplations, its incitements and ardors, its valleys and mountains, its depths and its ecstasies.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 274


How well she then understands herself a slave, and how precious is the release when granted! But, mercifully, such torment is rare. Commonly, as her body is played upon, as a musical instrument, she is brought to successions of crescendos of ecstasy.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 420









 


Small Bars
To The Top



Some of the beasts were striking on small bars, which, we gathered, constituted a form of music.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 452


A few Ehn later, there was a sharp ringing sound, resulting one supposes from the striking of one of the small bars, to the sounds of which the Lady Bina amongst other festal tokens, had been welcomed to the Cave.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 493









 


Sticks
To The Top



Within the stockade of the Mamba people there was much light and noise. I could hear the sounds of their musical instruments, and the pounding of the drums. Too, we could hear, within, the sounds of chanting and the beatings of the sticks carried in the hands of the dancers.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 401









 


Tabors
To The Top



A skirl on a flute and a sudden pounding on twin tabors, small, hand drums, called my attention to the square of sand at the side of which sat the musicians.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 133


I heard a swirl from a flute, the simple flute, not the double flute, and the quick pounding of a small tabor, these instruments now in the hands of Philebus' assistants.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 30


The two fellows who had supplied the music were silent. One wiped the flute, the other was addressing himself to the tabor, loosening some pegs, relaxing the tension of the drumhead. The drumhead is usually made of verrskin, as most often are wineskins.

"Can they dance?" asked the burly fellow, as though his mind might not yet be made up.

The taborist looked up.

"Alas, no," cried Philebus, in mock dismay, "none of my girls are dancers!"

The taborist continued his work.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 36


Philebus glanced at his fellows, and the one tried a short schedule of notes on the flute, the other retightened the pegs on the tabor.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 37


I heard the sound of a tabor several yards away, and the swirl of a flute, and the clapping of hands.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 43


A lad danced past, pounding on a tabor.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 61


The music of czehars, flutes, and kalikas, from scattered bands of musicians, swirled throughout the gigantic festival camp, spread over pasangs. There was the pounding of tabors, too, speaking of excitement and the rousings of blood.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 389


There was a skirl of music from the musicians outside, to one side of the sand, flutes, czehars, two kalikas, a tabor.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 431


With a swirl from the czehar and kalikas, and a pounding of the tabors, the dancers prostrated themselves in the sand, as slaves, and then, as Peisistratus struck his hands sharply together, they leapt up, and fled from the room, exiting through a portal, it curtained with dangling strands of blue and yellow beads, the caste colors of the slavers.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 164


There was the music of flutes, and a tabor, and one kalika, and a slave, she of one of Peisistratus' men, stamped her feet, and turned, and danced in the firelight. Bangles clashed upon her bared ankles. It is beautiful to see a slave dancing in the firelight. Or in the light of torches, or candles, in some such natural light.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 667


The tabor joined the flute, and then, suddenly, too, the kalika.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 676


I had seen them dancing in the firelight, in camps, to the rhythms of the czehar, the kalika, the flute, and tabor.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 363


"A tabor is a drum," I said.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 119


I knew that a yearning slave, to one side lying in her chains, must often await the outcome of such a game There was music in the tavern, a czehar player, a drummer, utilizing the small tabor, two flautists, and a pair of kalika players. He with the czehar was the leader. That was common, as I was given to understand.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 346


I imagined her, exhibited naked on the block, in chains, dancing to the flute and tabor, to the snap of the auctioneer's whip her belly promising untold pleasure to the master who would buy her.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 446


I saw, centrally, a circle of sand, which, I supposed, was dancing sand. There were cushions to the side, probably for musicians. The accompaniment for a dancer can vary considerably, from as little as a single flute, often the case with a street dancer, to several individuals and a variety of instruments. A typical group would consist of a czehar player, usually the leader, one or two flautists, one or two players of the kalika, and a taborist.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 263


At that moment there was, from beyond the leather curtain, the sudden skirl of a flute, the swift strumming of a kalika, and the pounding of the tabor.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 272


"If it were night, indoors," said Kurik, "I would suppose any number of things, depending on the house, music, the kalika and czehar, the aulus and tabor, acrobats, jugglers, flute girls, eaters of fire, the reading of poetry the chanting of histories, professional tellers of stories, the singing and dancing of slaves, many things."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 529


We prepared to proceed when the door to the exchange house swung open, and two fellows emerged. During the moment the door was ajar, I saw lamps within, and some men milling about. Two held goblets, probably of paga. There was also a screen. I heard some music, a czehar tabor, and flute. I could not see the musicians. They and, I supposed, the wheel, were behind the screen.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 654


No dancer was now performing. Later the czehar player would be joined by his fellows, two with kalikas, two with flutes, and one on the tabor. The czehar player was the leader of the group. That seems to be common.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 123


I also passed two stalls, in one of which a fellow was exhibiting drawings, paintings, carvings, and small pieces of metal artwork, while in the other a man was offering kaissa sets, cards, and dice for sale, displayed on a table, while, behind him, arranged on hooks and shelves, oddly enough, were flutes, tabors, and kalikas.
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 140


The musicians arrived and took their places at the side of the dancing floor. There was a czehar player, two flutists, and a drummer, with the small tabor. They were followed by the taverner's man who had gone to fetch them. "There are no dancers," said the czehar player, who was the leader of the small group. "Ianthe and Aglaia are unavailable."
Quarry of Gor     Book 35     Page 425









 


Tambourines
To The Top



There was also a second drummer, also with kaska, and another fellow, a younger one, who sat very seriously before what appeared to me to be a pile of objects; among them was a notched stick, played by sliding a polished tem-wood stick across its surface; cymbals of various sorts; what was obviously a tambourine;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 153









 


Trumpets
To The Top



A motion was on the floor that a new preserve in the northern forests be obtained, that more timber for the arsenal be available. In the northern forests Port Kar already had several such preserves. There is a ceremony in the establishment of such a preserve, involving proclamations and the soundings of trumpets.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 141


Below in the streets we heard trumpets. Men were shouting.

We saw some waving banners, bearing the design of the house of Sevarius.

They were trying to urge men into the streets to support them.

"Henrius Sevarius," they were crying, "Ubar of Port Kar."
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Pages 145 - 146


We heard music in the distance, trumpets, drums and cymbals. We looked at one another, scarcely able to restrain ourselves.
. . .

The drums, the cymbals, the trumpets, were now quite close. I lifted up an edge of the rain canvas and peeped through.
. . .

Behind him came musicians, with their trumpets, and cymbals and drums. They, too, wore skins, and the heads of forest panthers.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 209


I heard the blare of the trumpets, the clash of the cymbals, the pounding of the drums. The men shouted. Women cursed, and screamed their hatred of the panther girls.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 213


We heard the drums, the trumpets and clashing cymbals growing fainter, down the street, as the retinue continued on its way.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 216


At any rate, there was little doubt that the features of their Tatrix had now become well known in Corcyrus, at least to many of her citizens. Indeed, only this morning I, unveiled, in a large, open, silken palanquin, borne by slaves, Ligurious at my side, had been carried through the streets of Corcyrus, behind trumpets and drums, flanked by guards, through cheering crowds.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Pages 69 - 70


Otherwise, had I gone abroad in the robes of the Tatrix, we would have been encumbered by guards and crowds; we would have had to travel in a palanquin; we would have been forced to tolerate the annunciatory drums and trumpets, and put up with all the noisy, ostentatious, dreary panoply of office.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 100


Outside, in the canal traffic, I heard a drum, cymbals and trumpets, and a man shouting. He was proclaiming the excellencies of some theatrical troupe, such as the cleverness of its clowns and the beauty of its actresses, probably slaves.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 9


Outside I could hear the sounds of yet another troupe traversing the canal, with its raucous cries, its drums and trumpets.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 30


A blast was blown, this on a large conch trumpet.

This trumpet is called a horagai. It is sometimes used in Pani warfare as a battle horn, a signaling device to regulate the movements of troops. I had trained the cavalry, it might be recalled, to respond to the notes of such a device, a war horn. These, however, in the usual Gorean fashion, were formed of metal.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 503 - 504


I heard, frightened, crowded with the others, in the darkness, from outside, from the other side of the doors, the penetrating blast of a festive trumpet and a cry of eagerness, of anticipation, from a crowd, and, mixed therein, the wild roars and howls of excited Kurii.

"What is going on?" cried a woman.

"I do not know!" I said.

"I know the trumpet!" cried a woman.

"Yes!" cried another.

"Yes," said another "it is the trumpet!"

"What trumpet?" I asked.

"Such trumpets announce the games," said one of us, in the darkness.

"What games?" I asked.

"Arena games!" said another.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Pages 540 - 541


"You heard the trumpet," said another. "It is an arena trumpet. There are games. We are prizes. It is common in arena sports, in the killing games, the beast fights, in the tarn races, the races of kaiila and tharlarion, as in the contests of dramas, of choral song, of music, and poetry, to include kajirae amongst the winnings, amongst the spoils of victory. What do men care more for than power, gold, silver, and women?"
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 541


At the height of the tiers, on a separate platform, raised above the last tier, there was a helmeted fellow in the garb of the House of a Hundred Corridors, who stood near a stand on which there was fixed a large trumpet.

It was that trumpet, I supposed, that had emitted the blast that had initiated the games, if one might so refer to them.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Pages 545 - 546


We looked up to the platform of the trumpeter. The great trumpet, in its mount, was not tended. The platform was bare.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 559









 


Whistles
To The Top



It is a joke of young Goreans to sometimes whistle, or hum, such melodies, apparently innocently, in the presence of free women who, of course, are not familiar with them, and do not understand their origins or significance, and then to watch them become restless, and, usually, after a time, disturbed and apprehensive, hurry away.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 37


"It is a tune whistle," said Axel. "See the tiny holes. It is a pleasure to occasionally while away the time with it in a camp."

"Play us a tune," said Aeson.

"See how it is bent," said Axel. "It is defective. I would have it repaired."

"Try it," said Aeson.

"Even when new," said Axel, "not everyone could sound if and it is now broken."

"It requires strength to sound it?" asked Aeson.

"Yes," said Axel.

"Nonsense," said Genak. "Even a slave could sound so little a thing."

Axel laughed and slipped the whistle on its strap over his head. "Let us see," he said, motioning me to him. I approached him, and knelt, the large bottle supported in its net, the sling running from my left shoulder to my right hip. As I am right-handed, I would guide the neck of the bottle with the left hand, and lift and tip it with the right hand. Axel handed me the whistle. It was bent. It did have tiny holes in its barrel. It was not large. It was about two horts in length, perhaps a little longer.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 372


"About my neck," said Axel, "as is known to several, say, Aeson and Genak, and some others, hangs a small musical instrument, a whistle, which few can sound. As you are a large, strong fellow, and leader, he of most prowess we must assume, I wager that only you, of all in the camp, could sound the instrument."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 412









 


Zills
To The Top



I glanced within, for I heard from within the clash of slave bells and the bright sound of zills, or finger cymbals.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 21


Had he wondered what she would look like, long ago, when she was his teacher, she wondered, if she were to so dance before him, barefoot, in a bit of swirling silk, in necklaces and coins, in armlets, with bracelets on her wrists and bangles on her ankles, to the flash of ringing zills, summoned, commanded, fearful, begging to please, his.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 151




























The Quarry of Gor

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