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Food and Drink



Here are relevant references from the Books where Food and Drink are mentioned.
It is not meant to be anything other than the facts of the matter.
Arrive at your own conclusions.

I wish you well,
Fogaban




This section does not include every random mention of something to eat or drink, but it's most of them. With the initial posting, there are 1,692 quote entries supporting 244 listings.

I did not include specific references to the diet of Kurii. But, just so you know, they don't eat grain and usually prefer their meat raw.

Most quotes don't have a lot of surrounding text. This means if you want more context, get your book and read more.




Click a heading to jump down to that listing.


Main Headings
Bread / Grain
Dairy
Drink
Fish / Sea Food
Fruit
Meat
Miscellaneous
Nuts
Soup / Stew / Porridge
Spices / Seasonings
Sweets
Vegetables / Produce





 


Bread / Grain
To The Top

Biscuits
Black Bread
Bread
Crackers
Dried Precooked Meal
Dried Rence Paste
Flour
Grain
Rice
Rice Cakes
Rice Paste
Rolls
Sa-Tarna (opens another page)
Slave Bread
Unleavened Bread




 


Dairy
To The Top

Milk
Bosk Milk
Bosk Milk, Powdered
Kaiila Milk
Milk
Verr Milk


Other
Butter
Cheese
Creams
Creamed Sauce
Eggs
Verr Cheese




 


Drink
To The Top

Beer
Ale
Rence Beer


Birth Control
Breeding Wine (opens another page)
Second Wine (opens another page)
Slave Wine (opens another page)
Wine of the Noble Free Woman (opens another page)


Blood
Frozen Blood
Kur Blood
Sea Sleen Blood


Chocolate
Chocolate - Drink


Coffee / Tea
Blackwine (opens another page)
Bazi Tea (opens another page)
Tea (opens another page)


Juice
Juice
Larma Juice


Liquor
Liquor - Liqueur
Turian Liqueur


Mead
Mead


Milk
Bosk Milk
Bosk Milk, Powdered
Fermented Milk Curds
Kaiila Milk
Milk
Verr Milk


Water
Liana Vine Water


Whisky
Paga (opens another page)
Sake
Sul Paga (opens another page)


Wine
Cosian Wine
Falarian Wine
Ka-la-na (opens another page)
Kal-da (opens another page)
Palm Wine
Ta Wine
Turian Wine
White Wine
Wine
Wine of Free Companionship (opens another page)




 


Fish / Sea Food
To The Top

Bag Fish
Clams
Crabs
Dried Eels
Dried Fish
Dried Parsit
Eel
Eel Tongue
Fried Fish
Grunt
Lelt
Marsh Shark
Northern Shark
Octopus
Oysters
Parsit
Sea Sleen
Shark
Smoked Fish
Smoked Parsit
Snails
Song Fish - Songfish
Squid
Whale
White Grunt Eggs
White-Bellied Grunt
Wingfish




 


Fruit
To The Top

Apricots
Bar Fruit
Berries
Bush Fruit
Cherries
Chokecherries
Dates
Dried Berries
Dried Fruit
Dried Larma
Dried Tospit
Fried Larma
Fruit
Gim Berries
Grapes
Hard Fruit
Hard Larma
Iron Fruit
Larma
Melons
Peaches
Pears
Pit Fruit
Plums
Pomegranates
Pumpkin
Raisins
Ram-berries
Tospits
Tree Fruit
Vine Fruit




 


Meat
To The Top

(Beef)
Bosk
Brush Urt
Dried Bosk
Dried Kailiauk
Dried Meat
Dried Tabuk
Jerky
Kailiauk
Kailiauk Liver
Lean Meat
Liver
Meat Roll
Mountain Deer
Pemmican
Roast
Spiced Meat
Spiced Verr
Sweetmeat
Tabuk
Tharlarion
Verr
Wakapapi


(Pork)
Dried Tarsk
Sausage
Tarsk


(Fowl)
Bird, Raw
Coast Gull
Gant
Gant Eggs
Qualae
Spiced Vulo
Spiced Vulo Brain
Tumits
Vosk Gull
Vulo


Human
Human Flesh




 


Miscellaneous
To The Top

Aphrodisiacs
Garbage
Grubs
Insects
Leech
Lice
Mul Fungus
Pastes
Pellets
Sa-Tassna
Sauces
Snake
Supplements
Tiny Quivering Thing
Worms




 


Nuts
To The Top

Chestnuts
Honeyed Chestnuts
Nuts




 


Soup / Stew / Porridge
To The Top

Bond-Maid Gruel
Broth
Gruel
Meal
Millet
Mush
Porridge
Slave Porridge
Soup
Stew
Sullage




 


Spices / Seasonings
To The Top

Cinnamon
Cloves
Condiments
Garlic
Herbs
Nutmeg
Salt
Sesame Seeds
Seasonings
Spice
Spikenard
Sugar




 


Sweets
To The Top

Black Syrup
Cake
Candy
Caramel
Chocolate
Confections
Custard
Flavored Ices
Fudge
Honey
Honey Bread
Honey Cakes
Honey Sauce
Honeyed Chestnuts
Honeyed Meat
Honeyed Pastries
Honeyed Tur-Pah
Licorice
Mint Sticks
Molasses
Pastries
Peppermint Sticks
Pudding
Sherbet
Spiced Custard
Sugar
Sugared
Sugared Pellet
Sweets
Syrup
Syrupy
Tarts
Tasta
Turian Sugar




 


Vegetables / Produce
To The Top

Bamboo Shoots
Beans
Cabbage
Carrots
Corn
Ground Pods
Katch
Kelp
Kes
Kort
Leaves - Leafage
Lotus Roots
Maize
Mushrooms
Olives
Onions
Peas
Peppers
Potatoes
Radishes
Rence Cake
Rence Paste
Rence Pith
Rence Seeds
Roots
Shoots
Squash
Suls
Tubers
Turnips
Tur-Pah
Vangis
Vegetables
Wagmeza
Wagmu







 


Ale
To The Top


The Forkbeard himself now, from a wooden keg, poured a great tankard of ale, which must have been of the measure of five gallons. Over this he then closed his fist. It was the sign of the hammer, the sign of Thor. The tankard then, with two great bronze handles, was passed from hands to hands among the rowers. The men threw back their heads and, the liquid spilling down their bodies, drank ale. It was the victory ale.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 82


I saw cups of ale, on the bank, being lifted to him.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 83


Splendid was the quality of the ale at the tables of the Blue Tooth.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 191


We passed a dozen men emptying kegs of ale. It had become cloudy.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 260





 


Aphrodisiacs
To The Top


One dish I recall was composed of the tongues of eels and was sprinkled with flavored aphrodisiacs,
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 204





 


Apricots
To The Top


I brushed away two sellers of apricots and spices.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 45


Here and there I heard vendors hawking goods. One had pastries, another sweets. Another fellow, somewhere, was selling apricots.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 422


"Apricots! Apricots!" called a vendor.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 431


"Here, slaves!" I heard a fellow call.

It was the vendor of apricots. Quickly I and some four or five others sped to him, to kneel at his feet. He was in an excellent humor. I gather his business had prospered this afternoon.

"Please, Master," we begged. "Please!"

He pointed to his feet, and we crowded, one against the other, to lick and kiss them.

"Up!" he said.

We straightened up.

"Here is one for you," he said, "and one for you, and one for you!"

"Thank you, Master!" we cried. Such things are precious to us.

"Shameless sluts!" cried a free woman, one of the captives, in one of the coffles. She had beautiful blond hair. She was probably vain of it. The officers and the scribe had already passed her point in the line.

I had received an apricot.

"Disgusting sluts!" cried the free captive.

"Please, Master," I cried, "another. Another!"

He looked at us.

"Please!" we wheedled. We almost rose from our knees, so eager we were.

"Very well," he said.

"Thank you, Master!" we cried.

And each of us received another! How generous he was! He took the last apricot for himself, gripped it between his teeth, and held the basket upside down, shaking it twice.

"Thank you, Master!" we called after him, as he left.

"He should have thrown the last one amongst you," said the free woman. "it would have been amusing to see you fight for it. You meaningless she-sleen."

"I wish he had," snapped one of our number, the largest, a broad-bodied girl in a coarse rep-cloth tunic. "I would have obtained it!" I supposed she might, indeed, have won the apricot in any such contest. Indeed, even if she had not won it, she might have taken it away from whoever had won it, unless, of course, the master had prevented it. To us she was quiet fearsome, but to a man, of course, she would have been as only another female, to throw to his feet.

"Do not speak back to me!" snapped the free woman.

The broad-bodied girl went to stand near the free woman, looking down upon her. The free woman was kneeling in coffle. She was neck chained. Her wrists were shackled behind her. Her ankles, too, were shackled.

"Down on your knees!" cried the free woman.

"It is you who are on your knees," said the broad-bodied girl. I sensed she had little affection for free women.

But why should she?

Why should any of us?

Free women were our enemies. They seldom neglected an opportunity to be cruel to us. We were so helpless. They were so imperiously grand in their freedom. We muchly feared them.

"Do not rise up, Lady!" said one of our number, kneeling to the side. "You will be lashed!"

"I, lashed?" she said, incredulously. But she did not rise up, despite the broad-bodied girl's provocation. Perhaps she recalled what had happened to the girl in the other line, the other captive, who had done that.

"Yes, you, lashed," said the broad-bodied girl.

"You have two pieces of fruit," said the free woman. "Give me one!"

"No," said the broad-bodied girl.

"No?" said the free woman, stunned.

"No," said the broad-bodied girl, taking a goodly bite from one of the apricots.

"I command you to do so!" said the free woman.

"You are shackled, and you have a chain on your neck," said the broad-bodied girl.

"I shall call one of the guards!" said the free woman. The power of free women, if course, rests ultimately on the might of men. In the end, though this is sometimes obscured by social arrangements, it is the men who are the masters. Were it not for men, free women would be as powerless as slave girls.

"Call them," said the broad-bodied girl, biting again into the apricot.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Pages 434 - 436


Suddenly the broad-bodied girl kicked her in the side and then, biting on the apricot, holding it to her mouth, took the free woman by the hair with both hands and jerked her head back and forth. The free woman cried out in misery, in pain.

The broad-bodied girl then took the apricot from her mouth and bit into it again.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 437


It was a small enough vengeance, I supposed, for the insults which the free woman had recently addressed to us, for example, in the matter of the apricots. It was not wholly for such a purpose, however, that I was waiting there.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 439


"I said I was sorry," said the free woman. "I am hungry. Let me have part of one of your apricots!"

"Do you acknowledge that you are a girl?" asked the slave.

" - Yes," said the free woman.

"Do so," said the slave.

"I am a - a girl," said the free woman.

"A chained girl!" laughed another of the slaves.

"Yes, yes," wept the free woman. "I am only a chained girl! I am only a chained girl! Now, please, please give me even a part of one of your apricots!"

"Why should we give anything so precious to one who is only a chained girl?" inquired one of the slaves.

The free woman cast her a glance of consternation.

"Command me," said the girl who had been first addressed by the free woman.

"Give me one of your apricots," said the free woman.

"No," said the girl.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 441


"Why have you dallied here!" she said.
"Perhaps to give you an apricot," I said.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 444


"I could learn," she said, "to lick and kiss for candy."
"Or an apricot?" I smiled.
"Yes," she said.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 449


I looked about on the stones, for the two apricots. I seized them up. I split one and pitted it. I slipped the pit into the hem of my tunic. I would dispose of it later in an appropriate receptacle. One does not just cast such things about in such a place, particularly if one is a slave. The men of this world tend to be particular about their cities. In them, it seems, there are Home Stones. "Here!" I said. I placed the pitted fruit on the stones before her. She looked down at it. "Take it," I said. "It has been pitted. You need not fear the disposal of the seed. In time, you will learn to beg your own."
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Pages 451 - 452


I clutched the second apricot. I would give it to the Lady Constanzia. I did not doubt but what she would be deeply appreciative. Such tidbits, such things as a fresh apricot, are rare in the depths, even in the diet of a free woman. I would feed it to her by hand, little by little, as she knelt there, back-braceleted, by the wall, chained to a slave ring.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 45





 


Bag Fish
To The Top


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Bamboo Shoots
To The Top


He then addressed the other diners. "Note the kelp, the bamboo shoots, the fish, the lotus roots, and mushrooms."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204





 


Bar Fruit
To The Top


One, too, dug him tubers, wild suls, and the other brought him tree fruit, kernelled pods which dangle from the Bar tree, native, as we understand it, neither to Earth or Gor.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 183





 


Beans
To The Top


Initiates do not eat meat, or beans.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 26


I saw too, fields, fenced with rocks, in the sloping area. In them were growing, small at this season, shafts of Sa-Tarna; too, there would be peas, and beans, cabbages and onions, and patches of the golden sul, capable of surviving at this latitude.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded.


I stopped for a moment to watch an amusing race. Several slave girls are aligned, on all fours, poised, their heads down. Then, carefully, a line of beans, one to a girl, is placed before them. She must then, on all fours, push the bean before her, touching it only with her nose. The finish line was a few yards away. "Go!" I heard. The crowd cheered on its favorites. On this sport, as well as on several others, small bets were placed. Sometimes a new slave, one who has recently been a haughty, arrogant free woman, is used in such a race.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 38


"I would have thought," said Marcus, "that Ar might have rejoiced these days to obtain even the services of a lad with a beanshooter."
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 71


Perhaps some Peasants might buy them, to hoe suls, to pick beans, to swill tarsks, to draw the plow, to warm their feet in the winter.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 376





 


Berries
To The Top


A swallow of water from the flask and small, dry berries gathered from the nearby shrubbery were our only sustenance.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 115


"I have fled from those men for six days," wept the girl, "living on berries and insects, sleeping in ditches, hiding, running."
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 57


Nearby, to my delight, I found some berries to eat. They were good, and this filled me with some confidence.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 44


Here and there I found more berries, and, from time to time, more outcroppings of rock in which, almost invariably, I found water, doubtless trapped from recent rains.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 45


Ute and I, tied together by the throat, but otherwise unimpeded, wearing our camisks, like the other girls, under a guard, went off with two buckets to gather berries. There were not many berries, and it was not easy to fill our buckets.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 74 - 75


There was little sugar in the forest, save naturally in certain berries, and simple hard candies, such as a child might buy in shops in Ar, or Ko-ro-ba, were, among the panther girls in the remote forests, prized.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 31


"I lived for some days in the forest, but poorly, on berries and nuts. I tried to make snares. I caught nothing.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 57


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


"It will amuse me," he said, "to think of Tarl Cabot, laboring in the brine pits. As I rest in my palace, in the cool of the rooms, on cushions, relishing custards and berries, sipping beverages, delighted by my slave girls, among them your pretty Vella, I shall think of you, often, Tarl Cabot."
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 124


Outside the camp I was set to picking berries and gathering armloads of wood.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 49


The southern sugars are also popular. I had originally supposed this was because of their sweetness, there being few sweet items, save some berries, in the north.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 206


With them, too, they had brought eggs and berries, and many other things, spoils from the summer,
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 266


She carried a bowl of dried berries.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 301


"We were gathering berries," she said.
. . .
For hours we remained among the tiny fruit, talking and kissing, and caressing. Later, near dusk, he freed me, that I might gather berries for him, and feed them to him.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 237


"I am sorry," said Grunt. "Wasnapohdi is not here. She is out picking berries. I do not know when she will be back. After that she is supposed to help some of the other women."
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 97


"They supplement their diets by picking berries and digging wild turnips," said the first lad.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 124


"I have heard," said the other girl, who was a shorter one, "that each of us will have five berries put in our gruel this morning."
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 199


The slave returned to the place on the beach, with berries gathered in the woods adjacent to the slopes, those which led down to the beach.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 314


"In the trees," said Cabot, "we have a small camp, and there are edible leaves there, some gathered roots, and berries."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 339


"Would you like some tharlarion?" Cabot asked the slave.
She shuddered. "Your slave," she said, "would prefer leafage, or berries."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 341


"Come, Beast," said the Lady Bina to Grendel. "Bring me more berries, and leafage, roots, if well washed! I am hungry."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 343


"I am hungry for meat, friend," said Cabot. "After the supplies brought from the war camp, I have had little but berries, and, near the womb tunnel, some roots dug out from under the snow.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 593


Cecily and Jane, at the moment, with two sacks, had been set to gathering berries. When they returned they must put their heads back, open their mouths and extend their tongues. If there was any evidence of their having tasted a berry, either on their tongue or breath, they would be beaten. The berries were for the masters. Some could always be fed by hand to the slaves later, as they knelt at hand, naked, hands clasped behind their backs, or thrown before them to the floor, which they might then delicately retrieve, heads down, on all fours, without the use of their hands.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 519


It was there, visible locked, even when I might be up and about the camp, being summoned, fetching and carrying, cleaning, laundering, ironing, digging roots, picking berries, tidying, being about whatever duties might be given me.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 170


I was waiting, each day, hoping to be sent to the edge of the camp toward the wands, that I might search for roots, pick berries, or gather firewood.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 186


I knew enough of the forest within the wands to recognize many things outside them which might be eaten; leafy Tur-Pah, parasitic on Tur trees, of course, but, too, certain plants whose roots were edible, as the wild Sul; and there were flat ground pods in tangles which I could tear open, iron fruit whose shells might be broken between rocks, and autumn gim berries, purple and juicy, perhaps named for the bird, whose cast fruit lies under the snow, the seeds surviving until spring, when one in a thousand might germinate.
The berries are tasty. They do mark the tongue and, if one is not careful, the mouth.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 243


Then, given cloths, to be fashioned into sacks, we were sent into the woods to gather gim berries, under the supervision of short-haired Hiza.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 292


On these stones she placed a small iron fire rack. Soon, then, a pot of sullage, tended by Tula was bubbling over the fire. Emerald put some dried meat from her pack into the brew and Hiza cast in two handfuls of our picked berries into the brew.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 293 - 294


I again lifted the small porcelain bowl to my lips. The meat was gone, but there were some berries left. I had had such berries, from time to time, in Kennel Five, mixed with the slave gruel.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 295


I now had no fear, at least at present, at least until winter, of starving in the forest. Other than Tur-Pah, I could recognize the leafage which betokened Suls, usually found in the open, in drier, sandier soils, and was familiar with a number of edible nuts and berries, such as ram berries and gim berries, the latter common at this time of year. Even the horrid sip root was edible, despite its bitterness.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 441 - 442


"Please do not hurt me, Master," she said. "I will try to be a good slave. I will try to be pleasing. I will try not to disturb the Masters. I will carry burdens. I will tidy camps, I will prepare couches, I will gather nuts and berries, I will gather wood, I will carry water, I will cook!"
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 330





 


Bird, Raw
To The Top


Mostly I ate fruits and nuts, and some roots. Occasionally I would supplement this diet with the raw flesh of small birds, or that of an occasional brush urt, which I would manage to snare.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 247





 


Biscuits
To The Top


And there on that windy ledge, in that abode of the tarn, I ate the meal that satisfied me as no other had ever done, though it consisted only of some mouthfuls of water, some stale biscuits, and a wrapper of dried meat.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 144

A man handed me a bag of food. It contained dried fruit, biscuits, salt.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 267


I hurried to the pack kaiila and fetched from it the water bag. Grunt, from his own stores, brought forth some dried, pressed biscuits, baked in Kailiauk from Sa-Tara flour.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 328


I knelt before the whip master, anxiously lifting the tray to him. He picked up one of the biscuits. He turned it over. "This biscuit is burned on the bottom," he said. "If this happens again, you will be whipped."

"Yes, Master," I said. "Forgive me, Master."
. . .

"These biscuits are acceptable," he said. "In fact, they are good."

"Thank you, Master!" I said.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 294


In a few Ehn I then lay, fed on biscuit and meat, armed with blade and dagger, clothed in a tunic of Ar, on the raft.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 176


From the pack I had taken from the island which had been occupied by the men of Ar, in the time of the flies, I took a dry, flat biscuit. I began to feed.

"I am hungry," she said.
I gave her part of the biscuit. I put this in her mouth, bit by bit. In this fashion is a slave sometimes fed, I would hunt and fish when the opportunity presented itself.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 227


He drew her to the kitchen and threw her to her knees. Then he took a pan, threw it to the floor, and kicked it before her. He shook some biscuits into the pan, and they struck the pan and rattled about within it. She looked up, in misery. From a hook in the pantry he had taken down a slave whip. It was now in his hand. "Eat," he said.
Quickly she put down her head and, on all fours, addressed herself to the biscuits. They were dry and it was hard for her to eat them. She looked up, in misery. He lifted the whip. She again put down her head, sobbing. Perhaps she was slow. Perhaps he was impatient. He pulled her by the hair to an upright kneeling position and held her by the hair with his left hand, the loop at the butt of the whip about his wrist, where it hung against her right cheek, and, reaching into the pan, took the last two biscuits and thrust them into her mouth.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 332


Fel Doron passed her again, this time carrying supplies from the kitchen, bread, biscuits, dried fruit, a bulging sack of meal, which supplies he placed in a nearby tarn basket.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 335


A cloth strap ran over the blonde's right shoulder, to which was attached, near the left hip, but rather before her, a cloth sack, which apparently contained some form of sizable biscuits. One of these objects was thrust in Ellen's mouth. It was large, hard and dry. It filled her mouth. "Head down, chew," she was told. The blonde then moved to the next slave, she on Ellen's right. "Lift your head. Open your mouth. Keep your hands on your thighs," she heard. "Head down, chew." Ellen, head down, not permitted to use her hands, dealt with the object as well she could, it filling her mouth, her mouth dry. She tried to tear it with her teeth. She must keep her hands on her thighs. She must not drop it. She must not lose it. She tried to swallow some of it. She began to choke. Then, her mouth still filled, she gasped and caught her breath. She engorged more of the substance, and then more of it. Some girls behind the first slave, she with the biscuits, came a second slave, with a bucket and dipper. Ellen, desperately, half choking, tried to chew and force down the last of the biscuit.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Pages 369 - 370


Let them see that we do not have enough for them to risk war. If they wish to fight, we will fight. But I do not think that they will care to risk their lives for some biscuits, some blankets, a slave, a wagon, a tharlarion."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 565


While in the habitat village he also purchased supplies of various sorts, among them some biscuits and dried fruit, some vessels, some robes, three blankets, an ax, and two knives.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 370 - 371


In any event, venders of comestibles, biscuits, candy, fruit, and such, with their carts and trays, have been about, and doing their business, too.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 542


"Squeeze the larmas," said the Lady Bina. "There are biscuits, and honey breads, in the pantry."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 234


"If you are pleasing," said the fellow, "we will put a biscuit in the gruel, and perhaps a bit of meat."
I determined that I would be as pleasing as I could. I wanted the biscuit, I wanted the meat.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 65


"Thank you for enslaving me, Master," I said. I then bent down and placed my lips on his shoes, kissing each.
"Biscuit and meat," he said to his fellow, and, to my delight, I saw a biscuit and a bit of meat tossed into my bowl. He then moved on to the sixth girl. She was one of those who had worn jeans and a sweatshirt. The last girl in the line was she who had worn the maid's uniform.
Each, I noted, received both a biscuit and a bit of meat.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 66


He returned a bit later, with some water, and two biscuits.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 81


Occasionally, when the masters stopped at an inn, they resided within, and we were chained in kennels, in the inn yard. Slave biscuits and slave gruel were furnished, as part of our board.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 640





 


Black Bread
To The Top


The great merchant galleys of Port Kar, and Cos, and Tyros, and other maritime powers, utilized thousands of such miserable wretches, fed on brews of peas and black bread, chained in the rowing holds, under the whips of slave masters, their lives measured by feedings and beatings, and the labor of the oar.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 13


Their food is that of a galley slave, peas, black bread and onions.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 304


It was a grim fate which awaited them, the confinement and pain of the benches, the weight of the long oars, the shackles, the whip, the drum of the hortator, the stench, the black bread and onions of the ponderous galleys.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 342





 


Black Syrup
To The Top


You have not tasted the tospits in black syrup, have you?" inquired the reclining, garlanded male.

"No, Master," I said, kneeling, offering the plate to him.

"Open your mouth," he said, "and stick our your tongue."

How pleased I was that I had not, even in the kitchen, thrust so much as a finger into the syrup and licked it.

I did not wish to be whipped.

He thrust a food prong into the bowl, lifted forth a drenched tospit slice, and, nibbling, savored it.

"Excellent," he said.

"A slave is pleased," I said.

He then thrust the prong once more into the bowl, secured some three or four more slices, and slid them onto his plate, which was already laden with parsley, steamed rice, fried verr, and roast bosk.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 398


My serving dish was shortly empty, and I knew I should withdraw to the kitchen, either to have it layered with more syrupped tospit slices, or supplied with another provender, perhaps rice, white, or brown, or red or purple, from Cos, or a plate of cheeses, from local dairies, served with warmed bread, or prepared after the fashion of Ti, rolled in honeyed tur-pah leaves.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 401





 


Bond-Maid Gruel
To The Top


The men who had fished with the net had now cleaned the catch of parsit fish, and chopped the cleaned, boned, silverish bodies into pieces, a quarter inch in width. Another of the bond-maids was then freed to mix the bond-maid gruel, mixing fresh water with Sa-Tarna meal, and then stirring in the raw fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Pages 63 - 64


The bond-maids did not much care for their gruel, unsweetened, mudlike Sa-Tarna meal, with raw fish. They fed, however. One girl who did not care to feed was struck twice across her back by a knotted rope in the hand of Gorm. Quickly then, and well, she fed. The girls, including the slender blondish girl, emptied their bowls, even to licking them, and rubbing them with their saliva-dampened fingers, that no grain be left, lest Gorm, their keeper in the ship, should not be pleased. They looked to one another in fear, and put down their bowls, as they finished, fed bondwenches.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 65


"Open your mouth, my large-breasted beauty," said the Forkbeard.

Eyes wide, she did so. He thrust the contents of the small bowl into her mouth. Choking, the proud Aelgifu swallowed the thick gruel, that of dampened Sa-Tarna meal and raw fish, the gruel of bond-maids.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Pages 66 - 67





 


Bosk
To The Top


The meat was a steak, cut from the loin of a bosk, a huge, shaggy, long-horned, ill-tempered bovine which shambles in large, slow-moving herds across the prairies of Gor. Vika seared this meat, as thick as the forearm of a warrior, on a small iron grill over a kindling of charcoal cylinders, so that the thin margin of the outside was black, crisp and flaky and sealed within by the touch of the fire was the blood-rich flesh, hot and fat with juice.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 45


The Wagon Peoples grow no food, nor do they have manufacturing as we know it. They are herders and it is said, killers. They eat nothing that has touched the dirt. They live on the meat and milk of the bosk.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 4


I sensed that once this man might have ridden six hundred pasangs in a day, living on a mouthful of water and a handful of bosk meat kept soft and warm between his saddle and the back of the kaiila;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 43


"I grant her wish," said Kutaituchik. Then to a warrior nearby, he said, "Bring meat."
The warrior leapt from the dais and, in a few moments, returned with a handful of roasted bosk meat.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 54


He did what work he could, helping with the bosk, for a piece of meat from a cooking pot. He was called Harold, which is not a Tuchuk name, nor a name used among the Wagon Peoples, though it is similar to some of the Kassar names.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 67 - 68


"Perhaps," he suggested, "you would like a piece of roasted bosk meat?"
I replaced the golden eating prong in its rack beside my place, shoved back the glittering dish in which lay several theoretically edible objects, carefully arranged by a slave to resemble a bouquet of wild flowers sprouting from a rock outcropping. "Yes," I said, "I think so."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 86


My piece of bosk meat, roasted, had arrived. I picked it up and began to chew on it. I liked it better cooked over the open-fires on the prairie, but it was good bosk. I sank my teeth into the juicy meat, tearing it and chewing on it.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 89


Then he pointed at the meat. "It is overdone," he said.

"You were hours late," said Elisabeth

"Hours," repeated Aphris.

"It is overdone," said Kamchak.

"I shall roast fresh meat," said Elizabeth, getting up, and she did so. Aphris only sniffed.

When the meat was ready Kamchak ate his fill, and drank down, too, a flagon of bosk milk; I did the same, though the milk, at least for me, did not sit too well with the Paga of the afternoon.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 138 - 139


We lunched on dried bosk meat and Paga . . .
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 170


There was much grooming of wagon bosk, checking of harness and wagons, cutting of meat to be dried hanging from the sides of the moving wagons in the sun and wind.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 184


Kamchak, once a day, at night, the hour in which sleen are fed, would throw the girls bits of bosk meat and fill a pan of water kept in the cage.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 185


He was eating a piece of bosk meat in the Tuchuk fashion, holding the meat in his left hand and between his teeth, and cutting pieces from it with a quiva scarcely a quarter inch from his lips, then chewing the severed bite and then again holding the meat in his hand and teeth and cutting again.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 186


In the morning, before dawn, we awakened and fed on dried bosk meat, sucking the dew from the prairie grass.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 261


Harold and I chewed on some bosk meat roasted over a fire built on the marble floor of the palace of Phanius Turmus.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 271


"There is some roast bosk left," she said. "It is cold. It would be a bother to warm it up, so I will not do so. I am not a slave girl, you know."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 283 - 284


On the way to the compound I had met Harold and together we had eaten some dried bosk meat and drank water, from one of the commissary wagons attached to one of Hundreds in the city. As commanders we could eat where we chose.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 307


I heard someone chewing nearby and noted that Harold, who had thrust some strips of bosk meat from the commissary wagon in his belt, was busily engaged, quiva in hand, with cutting and eating the meat.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 308


After a bit of cold bosk, some water and a handful of peas, I had come the House of Cernus.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 40


The Tarn Keeper, who was called by those in the tavern Mip, bought the food, bosk steak and yellow bread, peas and Torian olives, and two golden-brown, starchy Suls, broken open and filled with melted bosk cheese. I bought the Paga, and several times we refilled our cups.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 168


My weapons shared the boat, with a gourd of water and a fin of bread and dried bosk meat.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 2


; then, before each of us, on the grass, the guards threw a large piece of cooked meat. I was famished and, burning my fingers, I clutched at it, and, half-choking, thrust it half into my mouth, tearing at it with my teeth and hands, the juices running at the sides of my mouth. I think few of my friends would have recognized the sophisticated, tasteful Elinor Brinton in the naked Gorean slave girl, chained, kneeling on the grass, thrusting meat into her mouth, tearing at it, her head back in ecstasy, feeding, the juices of the meat running on her body. It was only roast bosk, and half raw, but I devoured it. No delicate, sauced portion of filet mignon which I had savored in any Parisian restaurant compared to that hot, steaming chunk of bosk, half raw, running with juices, that I had seized from the grass of a Gorean field, beside the wagon of a slaver.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 65 - 66


Beyond the compound of Haakon of Skjern I could see the compound of his tarns, where, hobbled, the great birds beat their wings, threw back their heads and screamed, and tore at the great pieces of bosk thrown before them.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 91


Frequently, from a large pocket in his robes, the mountebank would throw the animal a tiny piece of bosk meat, when it had performed well. Sometimes he would scold it, and withhold the meat. Then the animal would put down its head, and turn it to the side, like a reprimanded child. And then the mountebank would give it its piece of meat. The guards enjoyed the performance as well as the girls. I saw that even Targo laughed, holding his belly in his blue-and-yellow slaver's robes. Sometimes the mountebank would give pieces of meat to the girls to throw to the beast. Lana begged hardest and was given the most pieces of meat. She threw me a look of triumph. I threw only one piece of meat to the animal and that quickly. The beast frightened me. Lana did not seem afraid at all. The piece of meat disappeared into that vast, fanged orifice and the large, round eyes blinked sleepily, contentedly.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 104


Then, from a hook on the wall, he took a large piece of meat, bosk meat, and threw it to the animal.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 153


I had been well fed the night before, for I had stopped, hidden in the darkness, near a peasant village, where, from a pole, I had stolen a piece of drying meat, bosk flesh.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 247


He then, with his tarn knife, from a piece of raw bosk meat, cut four small pieces of meat, which he placed in my mouth. "Feed," he said. I chewed the meat, eyes closed, swallowing it.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 256


The food had been good, bread and bosk meat, roasted, and cheese, and larma fruit.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 270


Rask of Treve looked at me. He was in an expansive mood. He cut a large slice of juicy bosk meat. My mouth watered. He smiled, and then he threw it to me. I caught it, happily, and with two hands, began to feed on it.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 302


Merchants brought sides of bosk, and thighs of tarsk, and wines and fruits to camp, and cheeses and breads and nuts, and flowers and candies and silks and honeys.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 321


I smelled roast bosk cooking, and fried vulo. It would be delicious. I thought no more of the girls.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 34


The girls looked at one another, wonderingly. The seaman unbound their wrists from behind their backs, and filled two trenchers, steaming now with bosk and vulo, which he thrust in their hands.

I watched them while, with fingers and teeth, they devoured the food.

When they had finished, I regarded them. "What are your names?" I asked.

They looked at one another. "Tana," said the first. "Ela," said the second.

"I wish to learn," I said, "the location of the camp and dancing circle of the outlaw girl, Verna."

Tana sucked her fingers. She laughed. "We will never tell you," she said.

"No," said Ela, finishing the last bit of roast bosk, her eyes closed.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Pages 36 - 37


There was a flash of slave bells at my side and a dark-haired, yellow-silked girl, a paga girl, knelt beside us, where we sat cross-legged behind the small table. "Paga, Masters?"

"For three," said I, expansively. "And bring bread and bosk, and grapes."

"Yes, Master."
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 46


"I would have paga," I said. "And bring me the red meat of bosk."

Henrius and Clitus left the table.

The sword was brought. It was a fine blade. It had been carried on the 25th of Se'Kara. Its blade was figured, its hilt encrusted with jewels.

I took the goblet, filled with burning paga. I had not had paga since returning from the northern forests.

"Ta-Sardar-Gor," said I, pouring a libation to the table. Then I stood.

"He is standing!" cried Luma. "He is standing!"

I threw back my head and swilled down the paga. The meat, red and hot, was brought, and I tore it in my teeth, the juices running at the side of my mouth.

The blood and the paga were hot and dark within me. I felt the heat of the meat.

I threw from me the goblet of gold. I tore the meat and finished it.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 22


With them, her hair combed, warmed with a broth of dried bosk meat, heated in a copper kettle, over a fire on a rimmed iron plate, legged, set on another plate on the stern quarter, her hands tied behind her with simple binding fiber, had gone Aelgifu.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 75


We had fed well in the hall of Svein Blue Tooth.
Many were the roast tarsk and roast bosk that had roasted over the long fire, on the iron spits. Splendid was the quality of the ale at the tables of the Blue Tooth. Sweet and strong was the mead.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 191


And brightly glowed the long fire in the hall, over which tarsk and bosk, crackling and glistening with hot fat, roasted, turned heavily on spits by eager, laughing bond-maids.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 279


He had ordered roast bosk and hot milk, and then yellow bread and paga.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 289


He sat, cross-legged, behind the low table. On it were hot bread, yellow sugars, slices of roast bosk, the scrambled eggs of vulos, pastries with creams and custards.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 20


"Soup! Soup!" called a man.

"Soup!" I called, raising my hand. I purchased from him, for a copper tarsk, a bowl of soup, thick with shreds of hot bosk and porous chunks of boiled sul.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 51


Free tarsk and roast bosk were being served, and Sa-Tarna bread and Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes of the Cosian terraces.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 98


"Have some meat," I said to him. I had been roasting some bosk over the small fire.

He, now a free man, came and sat near me, across the fire from me. The free woman shrank back, in the shadows. Constance knelt behind me and to my left, making herself unobtrusive. Occasionally she fed the fire.

The free man and I fed. "What is your name?" I asked. I threw a bit of meat to Constance, which she snatched up and ate.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Pages 127 - 128


"Master," said Constance, "there is food." She served me the hot bosk meat, the yellow bread, warm and fresh, and the wine.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 349


"Meat, Master?" asked a girl, nude, who knelt now beside me. She offered a tray on which small cubes of roasted bosk, on tiny sticks, steamed. I took several, dipping them by the sticks, in a sauce, carried on the same tray. I returned the tiny sticks to the tray and looked at the girl.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 192


"More, Master?" inquired the slave in bluish gauze, in the gleaming collar, kneeling behind me and to my left.

"Yes," I said.

With a serving prong she placed narrow strips of roast bosk and fried sul on my plate.

"Enough, Girl," I said.

"Yes, Master," she said.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 234


I took the blanket handed me at the door to the mess. I dried my feet and legs, and shivered, and stepped inside. I could smell fresh Sa-Tarna bread, roast bosk. My body ached, I was weary. I was looking forward to food, and hot paga.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 133


I was holding a large platter of strips of roast bosk, fastened in threes with wooden skewers, one of the choices for the second ostrakon.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 155


"May I serve Master?" I asked.
"What have you?" he asked.
"Roast bosk," I said.
"I have paid only the first ostrakon," he said.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 156


"Oh!" I cried, in misery, stumbling, plunging over Marcella's extended foot, sprawling between the benches, the platter of steaming meat flying ahead of me, meat and gravy showering about, then the platter clattering between the benches. Two or three men stood up, angrily wiping gravy and hot meat from their backs and shoulders. Marcella simultaneously, had screamed, and turned, as though it might have been she who had been so discomfited. And I, too, screamed, but in pain, as the scalding kal-da soaked and burned through my tunic, and drenched my calves and ankles. "Clumsy slave!" cried Marcella. "You tripped me!" I cried. "I did not! You tripped me!" she screamed. Several of the masters laughed, some brushing themselves off, some others helping themselves to a three of skewered slices of the roast bosk, which they retrieved from the table, the floor, their laps. I was on my hands and knees, in pain, from the scalding, tears bursting from my eyes. Masters, I knew did not look lightly on clumsiness in a slave. Too, to make matters worse, if they could be worse the roast bosk was an item available only for the second ostrakon.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 156 - 157


I now understood the extensive preparations, the mysterious recent behavior of Lord Grendel, the excitement of the Lady Bina the ka-la-na purchased, the flavorsome herbs, the bosk and tarsk, the early cooking.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 632


As my resources had been considerably replenished the previous evening, I had breakfasted well, on larma, vulo eggs, fried sul, roast bosk, sa-tarna, and even black wine, the beans for which, I supposed, derived from the far slopes of the Thentis mountains, and may have been brought west at some risk.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 76


It was a far cry from the provenders I had been taught to prepare in the house, ranging from roasted, seasoned bosk and tarsk and fresh plate breads, with honeys and butters, to frosted pastries and decadent, creamed sauces which, in some cities, were outlawed by sumptuary laws.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111


"Here, friend," said one of the leader's men, returned to the group, and cast a large slab of meat, it looked like bosk meat, before Tiomines.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 326


The contents of the trencher still steamed. It was amply laden, with strips of roast bosk, suls hot with butter, a salad of tur-pah and nuts, slices of tospit, and two large wedges of fresh bread. Naturally I regarded these treasures with unfeigned interest. To the side were a flat spatulalike spoon, and a pointed stick, a northern analog to the Turian earing, or dining, prong.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 268


He then thrust the prong once more into the bowl, secured some three or four more slices, and slid them onto his plate, which was already laden with parsley, steamed rice, fried verr, and roast bosk.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 398


I turned, and he threw me a strip of roast bosk, which I caught against my body. "Thank you, Master!" I cried, tears in my eyes, and turned, and hurried toward the dais, thrusting the meat in my mouth, rearing at it with fingers and teeth. Soon I was following Lord Grendel through a portal that led away from the feasting hall, down a long corridor. Following so, I fed on the meat, ravenously. When finished with it, I rubbed my finger on my body where the flung meat had struck, for there was a stain of grease there. I wiped this, as I could, from my body, and licked it from my finger.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 407


Whereas some food had been brought from Ar in the wagon, some bread, and cold, prepared dishes, the latter for the free, more food had been bought from the shops in the caravanserai, some cubed, salted bosk, and some kes, tur-pah, and suls. In one of the two vessels suspended over the fire, Paula had prepared sullage, a sort of sul soup, or, in this case, given the thickness of the mix, a sul stew, and, in the other, had boiled the bosk cubes, heating and softening them. She had first, as is usually done, washed and scrubbed the cubes in fresh water, which is done to reduce the salt content and make the cubes more palatable.

"Open your mouth," said my master.

I obeyed, and he, from the pan in which the cubes now resided, placed one of the small cubes of bosk in my mouth.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 616





 


Bosk Milk
To The Top


The Wagon Peoples grow no food, nor do they have manufacturing as we know it. They are herders and it is said, killers. They eat nothing that has touched the dirt. They live on the meat and milk of the bosk.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 4


I heard the lowing of milk bosk from among the wagons.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 27


When the meat was ready Kamchak ate his fill, and drank down, too, a flagon of bosk milk; I did the same, though the milk, at least for me, did not sit too well with the Paga of the afternoon.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 138 - 139


Ho-Tu, I noted, but did not speak to him of it, drank only water and, with a horn spoon, ate only a grain porridge mixed with bosk milk.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 87


Twice we stopped at palisaded villages, those of simple bosk herders. I liked these stops, for there we would have fresh bosk milk, still hot, and would have a roof over our heads for a night, be it only of grass.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 70


Then, kneeling, delighted, we were fed bread and roast tarsk, and hot bosk milk.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 88


There were only a few bosk visible, and they were milk bosk. The sheds I saw would accommodate many more animals. I surmised, as is common in Torvaldsland, most of the cattle had been driven higher into the mountains, to graze wild during the summer, to be fetched back to the shed only in the fall, with the coming of winter.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 82


"I hear a bell," she whispered.

"It is not the bell of a Coin Girl," I said. "It is the bell of a vendor of bosk milk. He is making his rounds, coming up the street."
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 161


I heard the bell, and the creak of the narrow, wooden wheels of the cart of the vendor of bosk milk, nearby.
. . .

He then, ringing his bell, leaning into the traces, attached to two wooden handles, drawing his two-wheeled cart behind him, proceeded up the street.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Pages 163 - 164





 


Bosk Milk, Powdered
To The Top


I brought up from the kitchen, where I had been keeping it hot, a vessel of black wine, with sugars, and cups and spoons. Too, I had brought up a small bowl of powdered bosk milk. We had finished the creams last night and, in any event, it was unlikely they would have lasted the night.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 295


I watched her as she mixed in a plentiful helping of powdered bosk milk, and two of the assorted sugars. She then left the small, rounded metal cup on the tray.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 296





 


Bread
To The Top


The bread was still hot from the oven.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 26


Moreover, where there was Kal-da there should be bread and meat. I thought of the yellow Gorean bread, baked in the shape of round, flat loaves, fresh and hot
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 76


The proprietor arrived with hot bread, honey, salt and, to my delight, a huge, hot roasted chunk of tarsk.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 79


In spite of the yoke I struggled to a cross-legged sitting position, and shook my head. In the food pan I saw half a loaf of coarse bread.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 101


Then, without speaking more, she picked up the bread from the pan, and held it for me. I bit two or three voracious mouthfuls of the coarse stuff and chewed it and gulped it down.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 102


In spite of some reservations the Poet, or Singer, was loved on Gor. It had not occurred to him that he owed misery and torment to his profession, and, on the whole, the Caste of Poets was thought to be a most happy band of men. "A handful of bread for a song," was a common Gorean invitation extended to members of the caste, and it might occur on the lips of a peasant or a Ubar, and the poet took great pride that he would sing the same song in both the hut of the peasant and the halls of the Ubar, though it won him only a crust of bread in one and a cap of gold in the other, gold often squandered on a beautiful woman who might leave him nothing but his songs.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 104


Beyond the Sullage and the bosk steak there was the inevitable flat, rounded loaf of the yellow Sa-Tarna bread.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 45


I had tarsk meat and yellow bread with honey, Gorean peas and a tankard of diluted Ka-la-na, warm water mixed with wine.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 87


"And put bread over the fire," I said, "and honey, and the eggs of vulos, and fried tarsk meat and a Torian larma fruit."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 106


"Why is it?" I asked Ho-Tu, whom I felt I had come to know somewhat better in the day, "that when others have Ka-la-na and meat and bread and honey you eat only this porridge?"
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 120


The Tarn Keeper, who was called by those in the tavern Mip, bought the food, bosk steak and yellow bread, peas and Torian olives, and two golden-brown, starchy Suls, broken open and filled with melted bosk cheese.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 168


Ho-Sorl, after several races, gave Phyllis a coin, ordering her to find a vendor and buy him some Sa-Tarna bread smeared with honey.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 217


I could see the bread ovens in one wall;
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 271


My weapons shared the boat, with a gourd of water and a tin of bread and dried bosk meat.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 2


The dried bosk meat in the tin, and the bread with it, yellow Sa-Tarna bread, now stale, was almost gone.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 8


There were great quantities of the yellow Sa-Tarna bread, in its rounded, six-part loaves.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 114


He wore the robes of his caste, the singers, and it was not known what city was his own. Many of the singers wander from place to place, selling their songs for bread and love.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 225


Now, chained, kneeling in a circle, we passed about, one to the other, a bowl of hot soup; then each of us was given a sixth of a round yellow loaf of bread, which we ate with our hands;
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 65


He thrust a huge piece of the yellow Sa-Tarna bread into my hands.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 114


I did not care particularly for the wooden bowls of stew and bread we commonly had at the public pens,
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 163


He thrust yellow Sa-Tarna bread into my mouth. I chewed the bread and, with difficulty, swallowed it.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 256


She had been ashore to buy some loaves of Sa-Tarna bread. The girl commonly carries the coin, or coins, in her mouth, for slave tunics, like most Gorean garments, have no pockets. Slaves are not permitted wallets, or pouches, as free persons. The baker had tied the sack about her neck, with a baker's knot, fastened behind the back of her neck. The girl is not supposed to be able to see to undo the knot. Even if she works it about to before her throat, she cannot see it. If she should untie it, it is unlikely she will be able to retie it properly. Naturally the sack may not be opened unless the knot has been undone. The baker's knot is supposed to minimize the amount of pilfering of pastries, and such, which might otherwise be done by slave girls.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 65


The water, many kegs, and the supplies, ranging from hard breads to slave nets, were aboard
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 68


Arn was chewing on a piece of dry Sa-Tarna bread. He washed it down with a swallow from his flask, filled earlier at the nearby stream.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 123


"See then," said he, "that your baking improves!" "Yes, my Jarl," she said, and fled away. "It is not bad bread," said Ivar Forkbeard to me, when she had disappeared from sight. He broke me a piece. We finished it. It was really quite good, but, as the Forkbeard ha said, it could have used a dash more salt
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 103


The Jarl, then, took, from the hands of Ivar Forkbeard's man, the leather-wrapped object.
It was a round, flat, six-sectioned loaf of Sa-Tarna bread.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 178


On the dais, with him, were several men, low tables of food, fruit, stews, tidbits of roast verr, assorted breads.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 212


Eta piled several of the hot, tiny eggs, earlier kept fresh in cool sand within the cave, on a plate, with heated yellow bread, for him.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 74


Sa-Tarna bread was brought forth and heated.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 238


We must serve the initial wines swiftly, with the matched breads and cheeses.
. . .
We knew then the wines, and the matched breads and cheeses, were ready.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 300


He sat, cross-legged, behind the low table. On it were hot bread, yellow sugars, slices of roast bosk, the scrambled eggs of vulos, pastries with creams and custards.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 20


She served me the hot bosk meat, the yellow bread, warm and fresh, and the wine.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 349


I was not chained, on the table was a bowl of cheap wine, some wedges of yellow bread and a wooden bowl containing vegetables and chunks of meat.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 87


I heard a man outside in the street, selling bread.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 214


"Bread, Master?" asked a blond-haired beauty, kneeling down beside me. She offered me a silver tray on which, hot and steaming, were wedges of Gorean bread, made from Sa-Tarna grain. I took one of them and, from the tureen, with the small silver dipper, both on the tray, poured hot butter on the bread.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 191


Peggy knelt before the table and began to place the cups, the vessels and plates on the table. One plate was of meat, another of breads, another of sliced fruits, the fourth of nuts and cheeses.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 257


There was, on the tray, a plate of fruit, some yellow, wedge-shaped bread, and a bowl of hot, rich-looking, dark-brown, almost-black fluid.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 42


I skirted a large cooking area. I could smell freshly baked bread, and the cooking of eggs and meat.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 201


"Surely," said the fellow who had carried me up the slope. Then, while the other fellow took his place on the wagon box and started the ponderous draft beast into motion, he gave me two generous pieces of bread, two full wedges of Sa-Tarna bread, a fourth of a loaf. Such bread is usually baked in round, flat loaves, with eight divisions in a loaf. Some smaller loaves are divided into four divisions. These divisions are a function, presumably, of their simplicity, the ease with which they may be made, the ease with which, even without explicit measurement, equalities may be produced.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 216


The wagon's lading was Sa-Tarna bread, and also, incidentally, Sa-Tarna meal and flour. It creaked under perhaps a hundred and fifty Gorean stone of such stores.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 27


"Bread, meat!" called a fellow, coming up beside the cart.
Several of us availed ourselves of his provender. I bought some wedges of Sa-Tarna bread and slices of dried tarsk meat,
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 257


"How much bread?" I asked.
"Two of four," she said. That would be half a loaf. The bread would be in the form of wedges. Gorean bread is almost always baked in round, flat loaves. The average loaf is cut into either four or eight wedges.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 70


She spooned the porridge into the bowls and set the bread, wedges, from a round, flat loaf, on the trenchers, and knelt back.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 158


"My friend, Plenius," I said, "has, I think, saved some hard bread in his pack, a piece or two. It is old and stale now, but you might find it of interest. Have you ever had such?"
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 347


"It is nearly ready," she said. She put some bread into the pan, too, for a few moments, to warm it.
. . .
"Turn the bread," I said.
"Ah!" she said.
After a bit we had eaten.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 443


An analogy would be the practice of cutting the round, flat Gorean loaves of sa-tarna bread into eight pieces.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 469


Ellen was then lowered into the last basket. In it, other than herself, there was only a blanket, a small loaf of bread, flat, and round, like most Gorean loaves, and a small bota, presumably filled with water.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 340


"We have been chained together," he observed, "in this soft, pleasant place. And to the side I see some wine, it seems, some larmas, some grapes, some wedges of soft bread."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 267


Hot bread with honey was on the table, on wooden trenchers.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 409


I could smell fresh Sa-Tarna bread, roast bosk. My body ached, I was weary. I was looking forward to food, and hot paga.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 133


Then, at a sharp clapping of Mrs. Rawlinson's hands, we leapt up and hurried to the kitchen, to bring forth the fare, the sweets, the candies, the nuts, the bowls of fruit, the herbs, the bread, flat, circular loaves of bread, which would be divided into eight wedges, the many covered dishes of boiled vegetables and hot meat, the vessels of wine, and such, and placed these on the serving table from which place we began to serve the guests.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 32 - 33


"Squeeze the larmas," said the Lady Bina. "There are biscuits, and honey breads, in the pantry."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 234


It was a far cry from the provenders I had been taught to prepare in the house, ranging from roasted, seasoned bosk and tarsk and fresh plate breads, with honeys and butters, to frosted pastries and decadent, creamed sauces which, in some cities, were outlawed by sumptuary laws.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111


I can smell the cook shops, fresh bread, and sausages.
. . .
The common Gorean loaf, so to speak, is flat and circular. It may be larger or smaller. It is commonly divided into four, if smaller, or eight, if larger, wedgelike pieces, these pieces sold separately.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 251


The contents of the trencher still steamed. It was amply laden, with strips of roast bosk, suls hot with butter, a salad of tur-pah and nuts, slices of tospit, and two large wedges of fresh bread.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 268


My serving dish was shortly empty, and I knew I should withdraw to the kitchen, either to have it layered with more syrupped tospit slices, or supplied with another provender, perhaps rice, white, or brown, or red or purple, from Cos, or a plate of cheeses, from local dairies, served with warmed bread, or prepared after the fashion of Ti, rolled in honeyed tur-pah leaves.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 401


"We shall be fortunate," I said, "if they permit us to nibble some cheese from the palm of their hand, while we kneel head down before them, fortunate if they cast us a crust of bread!"
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 598


Shortly thereafter our wrists were freed from the slave bracelets, and we were given a round, flat loaf of bread, which we eagerly divided between us.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 604





 


Broth
To The Top


With them, her hair combed, warmed with a broth of dried bosk meat, heated in a copper kettle, over a fire on a rimmed iron plate, legged, set on another plate on the stern quarter, her hands tied behind her with simple binding fiber, had gone Aelgifu.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 75


"How long were we unconscious?" I asked.
"With tube feedings, of broth mixed with Tassa, five days," she said.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 87


"I have water," I said, "but no broth, or soup."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 18


Some ten days after her escape and recovery, and six days after it had begun, the Lady Bina's fever broke. She then, after imbibing some broth administered to her by Lord Grendel, slept soundly for a full day.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 569


Twice he had taken broth, and then slept again.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 584 - 485


"Master," she said, seeing my eyes upon her, "may I approach? I bear nourishment."

"Yes," I said.

In her two hands she bore a bowl.

"Broth," she said.

"There," I said, brushing some straw aside, and indicating where she might place the bowl, before me.

She approached, insufficiently humbly I thought.

She bent down.

She started. The bowl had suddenly jerked, and broth had leapt in the bowl, some of it running down the side of the bowl, some spilling to the wood. She looked suddenly frightened. Such as she could be whipped for clumsiness.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 37


I picked up the bowl of broth, and sipped some. It was still warm, and I was grateful for it.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 41


I swirled the bit of broth remaining in the metal bowl.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 62


"She is pretty, is she not?" said Lord Nishida.
"She is not a bad-looking slave," I said.
"But you do not want her sent to you tonight?" he said.
"No," I said. "I will sleep."
"As you will," said Lord Nishida.
"But I might," I said, "like strong broth."
"It will be so," said Lord Nishida.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 98


It had been clear to me, almost from the beginning, that there were female slaves on board. One, the slave girl, Alcinoë, once the high lady, Flavia of Ar, confidante even of the former Ubara, Talena, had been sent to me in my cell, barefoot and tunicked, to humbly serve me, to bring me, in her abject servitude, a free man, now unspeakably above her, she now less than the dust beneath his feet, a bowl of broth.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 120





 


Bush Fruit
To The Top


But wines, as is well known, may be derived not only from the clustered fruits weighting the branches of the ka-la-na tree in the autumn, but, as on my former world, from vine fruit, tree fruit, bush fruit, even from some types of leaves.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 295





 


Brush Urt
To The Top


Mostly I ate fruits and nuts, and some roots. Occasionally I would supplement this diet with the raw flesh of small birds, or that of an occasional brush urt, which I would manage to snare.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 247





 


Butter
To The Top


I saw small fruit trees, and hives, where honey bees were raised; and there were small sheds, here and there, with sloping roofs of boards; in some such sheds might craftsmen work; in others fish might be dried or butter made.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


I had no wish to be thrown bound beneath the hoes of thralls because I had inadvertently insulted a free man-at-arms or breached a custom, perhaps as simple as using the butter before someone who sat closer to the high-seat pillars than myself.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 96


"Olga," he said, "there is butter to be churning in the churning shed."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 101


We stopped by the churning shed, where Olga, sweating, had finished making a keg of butter. We dipped our fingers into the keg. It was quite good. "Take it to the kitchen," said the Forkbeard. "Yes, my Jarl," she said.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 102


"But I am of Ax Glacier," said the Forkbeard. In Ax Glacier country, of course, there were no farms, and there were no verr or bosk, there being insufficient grazing. Accordingly there would be little field dunging to be done, there being no fields in the first place and no dung in the second; too, due to the absence of verr or bosk, butter would be in scarce supply.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 156


"And, too, I swear," said Svein Blue Tooth, "by the bronze of my ladles and the bottoms of my butter pans!"
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 184


I was fond of Constance. Why should she herd verr and churn butter in Torvaldsland?
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 440


"Bread, Master?" asked a blond-haired beauty, kneeling down beside me. She offered me a silver tray on which, hot and steaming, were wedges of Gorean bread, made from Sa-Tarna grain. I took one of them and, from the tureen, with the small silver dipper, both on the tray, poured hot butter on the bread. I then dismissed her with a gesture of my head and she rose lightly to her feet and left, to serve another.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 191


The sul is a large, thick-skinned, starchy, yellow-fleshed root vegetable. It is very common on this world. There are a thousand ways in which it is prepared. It is fed even to slaves. I had had some at the house, narrow, cooked slices smeared with butter, sprinkled with salt, fed to me by hand.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 80


It was a far cry from the provenders I had been taught to prepare in the house, ranging from roasted, seasoned bosk and tarsk and fresh plate breads, with honeys and butters, to frosted pastries and decadent, creamed sauces which, in some cities, were outlawed by sumptuary laws.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111


"There are golden suls," said Lord Yamada "with butter and cream, from our own dairy."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 206


The contents of the trencher still steamed. It was amply laden, with strips of roast bosk, suls hot with butter, a salad of tur-pah and nuts, slices of tospit, and two large wedges of fresh bread. Naturally I regarded these treasures with unfeigned interest. To the side were a flat spatulalike spoon, and a pointed stick, a northern analog to the Turian earing, or dining, prong.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 268





 


Cabbage
To The Top


I saw too, fields, fenced with rocks, in the sloping area. In them were growing, small at this season, shafts of Sa-Tarna; too, there would be peas, and beans, cabbages and onions, and patches of the golden sul, capable of surviving at this latitude.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81





 


Cake
To The Top


The slaves are never brought to the surface, and once plunged into the cold darkness of the mines never again see the sun. The only relief in their existence comes once a year, on the birthday of the Tatrix, when they are served a small cake, made with honey and sesame seeds, and a small pot of poor Kal-da.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 150


Muls feed four times a day. In the first meal, Mul-Fungus is ground and mixed with water, forming a porridge of sorts; for the second meal it is chopped into rough two-inch cubes; for the third meal it is minced with Mul-Pellets and served as a sort of cold hash; the Mul-Pellets are undoubtedly some type of dietary supplement; at the final meal Mul-Fungus is pressed into a large, flat cake and sprinkled with a few grains of salt.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 109


I was pleased to see again, though often done in silk, the splendid varieties of caste colors of the typical Gorean city, to hear once more the cries of peddlers that I knew so well, the cake sellers, the hawkers of vegetables, the wine vendor bending under a double verrskin of his vintage.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 87


Moving boldly now among the Wagon Peoples were vendors from Turia, selling their cakes, their wines and meats, even chains and collars.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 113


"I shop for wealthy women," said she, "for pastries and tarts and cakes things they will not trust their female slaves to buy."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 238


Then, at dawn, on the first day of En'Kara, . . .
. . .
Even the slaves in the iron pens in the House of Cernus received that day a small cake with oil and had their troughs filled with water mixed with Paga.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 212


In a moment the woman had returned with a double handful of wet rence paste. When fried on flat stones it makes a kind of cake, often sprinkled with rence seeds.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 25


She herself nibbled on a rence cake, watching me, and then on some dried fish which she drew also from the wallet.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 34


Around the tenth Gorean hour, the Gorean noon, the rencers ate small rence cakes, dotted with seeds, drank water, and nibbled on scraps of fish.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 41


I had carried about bowls of cut, fried fish, and wooden trays of roasted tarsk meat, and roasted gants, threaded on sticks, and rence cakes and porridges, and gourd flagons, many times replenished, of rence beer.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 44


She was eating a rence cake. Her mouth was half full. She looked at me. "I shall not bind you tonight," she said.

Holding half the rence cake in her mouth she unrolled her sleeping mat and then, as she had the night before, she unlaced her tunic and slipped it off over her head. She threw it to the corner of the hut, on her left, near her feet. She sat on the sleeping mat and finished the rence cake. Then she wiped her mouth with her arm, and slapped her hands together, freeing them of crumbs.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 48


Then I shook out what food lay in the wallet, some dried rence paste from the day before yesterday, some dried flakes of fish, a piece of rence cake.
We shared this food.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 65


She wiped the last of the crumbs of rence cake from her mouth with the back of her left hand.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 77


from a vendor, the Forkbeard bought his girls honey cake; with their fingers they ate it eagerly, crumbs at the side of their mouths.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 144


He stopped to buy a cake from a vendor on the wharf.
. . .
He was coming toward me now, eating on the bit of cake he had purchased.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 347


When she had had a good session Ulafi would sometimes, when he thought of it, throw her a bit of cake or pastry, which she would gratefully receive. She would then kneel before Ulafi and kiss his feet, clutching the bit of cake or pastry. "Thank you, Master," she would say. She would then kneel before Sasi, her teacher, and offer her the bit of cake or pastry, which Sasi would take, taking most of it and returning a portion of it to her. "Thank you, Mistress," she would say, for Sasi was first girl. She would then creep to her cage, and be locked within it. She would lie curled up in it, a lovely, helpless slave, and try to make the bit of cake or pastry last as long as possible.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 77


Wakapapi," said Cuwignaka to me. This is the Kaiila word for pemmican. A soft cake of this substance was pressed into my hands.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 46


I sat on the robes, eating the crumbled cake of pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 47


He quickly gave her half of the tiny cake of pemmican and she, on her knees, naked, swiftly, ravenously, ate it.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 295


"Masters?" asked Tuka, kneeling, holding the tray. We took the fried maize cakes from the tray.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 369


"Cakes, Masters?" I asked, kneeling near them, proffering them the tray.

"Yes," said Drusus Rencius.

"Yes," said Publius.

Drusus Rencius and Publius did not have slaves of their own in Argentum. Susan and I had been volunteered by our master, Miles of Argentum, to serve them. With a movement of Publius's finger, I was dismissed from the side of their table.

I replaced the tray of tiny cakes on the nearby serving table.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 405


The real attendant was probably upstairs in the paga room, enjoying cakes and Bazi tea, a breakfast popular with Goreans on holidays.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 117


I took a small cake from my pouch, and she eagerly reached for it, but I drew it back. I gathered she was indeed hungry.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 395


Later, each slave brought forth, as well, a tray of assorted cakes and pastries.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 579


We would bring the gamesters Paga and ka-la-na, and platters of meat and bread, and cakes and sweets, to keep them at the tables.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 61


The Lady Bina would remain near the wagons, in the camp's "palace of free women," a small, closely guarded area, scarcely a palace, more a small house, supplied with certain amenities, cakes, ka-la-na, and such.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 340


"I have brought you some tiny honey cakes," I whispered, "from the food cart of the masters."

"You will be beaten," said Jane.

"No," I said. "It is with the permission of the Lady Bina."

"The Mistress?" said Jane.

How easily, I thought, that word now comes to us!

"Yes," I said. "Do not be concerned. They were left over. No one wanted them."

"Garbage," said Jane.

"I suppose so," I said, "in a way."

"Then when crumbs are found on our mouth, we will be whipped!" said Jane.

"I will take them away," I said.

"No!" said Jane. "Please, no!"

"We have not had a sweet in weeks," said Eve.

"Perhaps you remember how on Earth" I said, "we might indulge ourselves as we pleased."

Small hands, shackled, reached toward me. "P1ease, Allison " said Jane. "Please, please, Allison," begged Eve.

I had brought four of the small honey cakes, and I gave two to each of the slaves.

They thrust them into their mouths, with soft cries of gratitude, and pleasure.

"Thank you, oh, thank you!" they breathed.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 342 - 343


They removed the silken covers and we noted the hampers were heaped with fruits, vegetables, cakes of rice, smoked fish, layers of dried, salted meat, and stoppered vessels which I supposed might contain sake, and perhaps, considering the continental mercenaries in the camp, none of whom had been permitted, save myself, to attend these proceedings, paga and ka-la-na.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 55


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208


Then the Kur, angrily, suddenly, overturned one of the tables, spilling wine, cakes, and fruit, but it made no effort to more closely approach the guests, who had shrunk back even further.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 533


When one is a slave, small things can be important, and precious, to one. I suspected that a slave might value such things, small things, a pastry a candy, a bit of honey cake, more than a well-to-do free woman, particularly of a high caste, might the expensive delicacies and sumptuous fare that were at her disposal, and to which she might be accustomed.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 651





 


Candy
To The Top


The crowd seemed eager to observe what would happen next. It stirred impatiently beneath the billowing silk of the awnings, rearranged its silken cushions, partook distractedly of candies and sweetmeats distributed by gray-robed figures.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 117


In one instant that must have been the most terrifying in her life the Tatrix stood alone, looking up, deserted by all, on the steps before her golden throne in the midst of tumbled cushions and trays of candies and sweetmeats.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 128


"I did not expect to see you in Turia, I said.

"Neither did the Turians," remarked Harold, reaching over the shoulder of one of the high council of Turia and taking a candied verr chop.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 253


During the time of the race the hawkers of candies, sweetmeats, Kal-da, pastries and paga were quiet, standing with their goods in the aisles watching.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 139


The hawkers of candies and such were now crying their wares.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 141


"Candies!" whined a small voice some yards below me. "Candies!"

I looked down and was startled to see, some four tiers below, not seeing me, the pathetic, stubby, bulbous little body of Hup the Fool, limping and hopping about in the aisle, his large head on the fat little body lolling one way or another, the tongue occasionally, suddenly, unexpectedly, protruding uncontrollably. His knobby hands were clutching a candy tray which was fastened behind his neck with a, strap. "Candies!" he whined. "Candies!"

Many of the people he passed turned away. The free women drew their hoods about their faces. Some of the men angrily gestured for the little fool to hurry from their area, lest he spoil the races for their women. I did note that a young slave girl, however, perhaps about fifteen, with a coin given her by her master, did purchase a small candy from the little Hup. I might have bought some myself but I did not wish him to recognize me, assuming that his simple mind might hold the remembrance of our first meeting, that at the tavern of Spindius, where I had saved his life.

"Candies!" called the little fellow. "Candies!"

I supposed Hup, though he doubtless spent much of his time begging, made what money he could, and vending candies at the races might help him to live. I wondered if the golden tarn disk, that of Portus, which I had given to him at the tavern had been used to buy a vending license.

"I think I shall have a candy," said the man behind me.

I arose and turned away, leaving my place on the tier, that I might not be seen by Hup, should he approach the man. I looked neither to the left or right, but moved away. "Candy!" called the man behind me.

"Yes, Master!" I heard Hup call and begin to make his way toward the man.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Pages 144 - 145


I reached out and began to walk after him but I stumbled into the body of Hup the Fool, spilling his tray of candies. "Oh, oh, oh!" cried the fool in misery. Angrily I tried to step about him, but then there were others pressing between myself and the large man in the peasant's garments, and he had disappeared. I ran after him but could not find him in the crowd.

Hup hobbled angrily after me, jerking on my tunic. "Pay! Pay!" he whined.

I looked down at him and I saw, in those wide, simple eyes, of uneven size, no recognition, His poor mind could not even recall the face of the man who had saved his life. Irritably I gave him a silver forty-piece, far more than enough to pay for the spilled candies, and strode away. "Thank you, Master," whined the fool, leaping about from one foot to the other. "Thank you, Master!"
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 157


I held her head on my shoulder. What she said was to a large extent true, for she was being conditioned to certain responses by pain and rewards. Indeed, sometimes the girls would be forced to compete among themselves, with small candies as prizes, and each would find herself, to her subsequent horror, striving eagerly to outdo the others, that it might be she to whom Sura would throw the sugared pellet. Sometimes Sura would let the men observing determine which girl should receive the pellet, that they might learn how to win men's pleasure.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Pages 194 - 195


Targo, and some of the guards, sometimes, would give her candies, and sweetmeats.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 61


In the private pens we were given better food, lean meats and vegetables and fruits, and, if our group had trained acceptably, after the evening meal, before being returned, hooded, to the public pens, we would be given candies or pastries, or, sometimes, a swallow of Ka-la-na wine.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 163


He took a hard candy from his pouch, and held it, outside of my reach.

I straggled to reach the candy. I could not. Then he handed it to me.

"Thank you, Master," I said. I put the candy in my mouth. I had known his step. Few of the guards carried candies. I was pleased with myself. I did not think Inge would have succeeded in winning a candy from him.

I sat in the straw and sucked the candy.

"I forgive you, El-in-or," said Inge. Her voice sounded weary.

I did not answer her, for I feared she might want to taste the candy, that it would be a trick on her part.

I heard Lana approach. She thrust out her hand. "Give it to me," she said.

"It's mine," I said.

"Give it to Lana," said Lana. "I am first in the cage."

She was stronger than I.

I gave her the candy and she put it in her mouth.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 178 - 179


Merchants brought sides of bosk, and thighs of tarsk, and wines and fruits to camp, and cheeses and breads and nuts, and flowers and candies and silks and honeys.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 321


"It is a well-known rendezvous point," said Samos. "It was there one of my ships picked him up, and others." He looked at the man. "Do you recall your price?"

"Two steel knives," said the man, "and fifty steel arrow points."

"And a stone of hard candies, from the kitchens of Ar," smiled Samos.

"Yes," said the man, through gritted teeth.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 13


"And a stone of candies," she said, looking up, suddenly.

"Very well," I said.

"For each!" she demanded.

"Very well," I said.

She slapped her knees and laughed. The girls seemed delighted.

There was little sugar in the forest, save naturally in certain berries, and simple hard candies, such as a child might buy in shops in Ar, or Ko-ro-ba, were, among the panther girls in the remote forests, prized.

It was not unknown that among the bands in the forests, a male might be sold for as little as a handful of such candies. When dealing with men, however, the girls usually demanded, and received, goods of greater value to them, usually knives, arrow points, small spear points; sometimes armlets, and bracelets and necklaces, and mirrors; sometimes slave nets and slave traps, to aid in their hunting; sometimes slave chains, and manacles, to secure their catches.

I had the goods brought from the ship, with scales to weigh out the candies.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 31


"Bring candies," said I to a seaman.
He did so.
I tossed one to each of the girls. They took the candies.
. . .
I threw each of them another candy. Then, not speaking further, I rose to my feet, and left them.
. . .
The chains were removed from the necks of the girls. They had been well treated today. They had been fed well, and sufficiently watered. After their meals, candies had been given them.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 37


"She will have to learn Gorean, and quickly," said Samos, referring to the blondish girl.
"Let slaves, with switches, teach her," I said.
"I will," said Samos. There was no swifter way for an Earth girl to learn Gorean, providing that candies and pastries, and little favors, like a blanket in the pens, were mixed in.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 13


A girl might have to perform superbly for hours before her master before he, in his generosity, would consent to throw her a candy.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 77


"Your memory has improved," I congratulated her. From my saddlebags I threw her a candy.
"Are you not angry with me, Master?" she asked. "No," I said. She thrust the candy in her mouth. I moved the kaiila on.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 344


"You were a good slave girl. You are to be commended, I said. "Throw her a candy," I said to one of the men.

He did so.

"Eat it," I told Vella.

She did so.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 351


Some girls attempt to flee to the greenwood forests of the north. In such forests, in certain territories, there roam bands of free women, the lithe, ferocious Panther Girls of Gor, but these despise and hate women not of their own fierce ilk; in particular do they revile and hold in contempt girls, beauties, who have been slaves to men; should such a girl, fleeing enter the cool vastness of their green domain, she is commonly hunted down like a tabuk doe and cruelly captured; the forests are not for such as she; she is tethered and bound, and often lashed, then driven by switches helplessly to the shores of Thassa or the banks of the Laurius, and then sold back to men, usually for weapons or candy.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 98


He took something from his pouch and thrust it in my mouth, pressing it between my teeth with his thumb, depositing it in the side of my mouth. I was startled, kneeling in the dirt at the post, my hands bound about it. "Thank you, Master," I said. It was a small, hard candy. It was sweet. I closed my eyes. It was the first sweet I had had since I had been brought to Gor. In the plain diet of a slave girl, such things are very precious. Girls would fight and tear at one another for a chocolate. Confections are commonly used by masters as rewards in the training and conditioning of their girls. Beyond this they may continue to function as control devices and incitements. Even a slave girl of many years never loses her taste for a bit of candy, for which she may have to work for hours. It is common to give the girl the candy while she is in a kneeling position, putting it in her mouth for her. On the other hand, in training, candies are commonly thrown to the girls. Sometimes, too, for the amusement of the master, candies will be thrown to the floor among several girls, to observe their struggle to obtain these prizes.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 216 - 217


After a time I said, "May I have a candy, Master?" I had not forgotten the candy he had given me beneath the hut of Thurnus. How sweet and good it had been. It had been only a cheap hard candy but such things are rare in the lives of most slave girls. They are very precious.

"Do you want it very much?" asked Tup Ladletender.

"Yes, Master," I said.

He took me in his arms, and thrust me back to the mud between the wheels of the cart. I looked up at him.

"Earn it," he said.

"Yes, Master," I said, reaching for him.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 246


"I am sorry I fought you for the candy," she said.

"I won it," I said, angrily.

"Yes, Teela," she said. Then she said, angrily, "It fell closest to me. It should have been mine."

Busebius, our master, sometimes, before ordering us to bathe and prepare ourselves for the floor, scattered a handful of hard candies among us. They were very precious, and, on the tiles of the slave room, we fought for them.

I looked at Bina.

I had leaped for the candy. It had been snatched by her hand. I had torn open her hand and thrust it in my mouth.

She had struck me and pulled my hair. Rolling, wildly, screaming, we had bitten, clawed and kicked at one another. Then
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 294 - 295


Afterwards he had, before leaving, thrown a candy to the floor before me which I, gratefully, in the manner of the Chatka and Curla, which was necessary, had picked up in my mouth. "Thank you, Master," I had said. The candy was hard and very sweet. I showed it off to the other girls. "I pleased the master," I boasted. "He once gave me five candies," said Narla. "Liar!" I cried. I knew the master had never even called for her. We leaped toward one another. Tima, the first girl, had separated us with a whip.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 342


"Candies! Candies!" called a hawker of sweets near me in the crowd. "Candies of Ar!"
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 54


"Candies! Candies!" called a veiled free woman. She carried candies on a tray, held about her neck by a broad strap.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 68


My goods, substantially, consisted of blankets, colored cloths, ribbons, mirrors and beads, kettles and pans, popular in the grasslands, hard candies, cake sugar and chemical dyes.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 145


Grunt went again to his stores and brought forth some packages, wrapped in waxed paper. "Canhanpisasa," said Grunt. "Canhanpitasaka. Canhanpitiktica." He then began to pass out, to the Dust-Leg men and women about, pieces of candy, lumps of cake sugar and flakes of dried molasses. The woman with whom I was dealing, too, received a palmful of molasses flakes. She smacked her lips. Grunt and she then exchanged what I took to be appropriate civilities and compliments.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 216


"Hurtha," said I, "what have you there?"

"Fruits, dried and fresh, candies, nuts, four sorts of meats, choice, all of them, fresh-baked bread, selected pastries," responded he, his arms full, "and some superb paga and delicate ka-la-na."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 80


It had to do with "tastas" or "stick candies." These are not candies, incidentally, like sticks, as, for example, licorice or peppermint sticks, but soft, rounded, succulent candies, usually covered with a coating of syrup or fudge, rather in the nature of the caramel apple, but much smaller, and, like a caramel apple, mounted on sticks. The candy is prepared and then the stick, from the bottom, is thrust up, deeply, into it. It is then ready to be eaten. As the candy is held neatly in place there is very little mess in this arrangement. Similarly, as the candy is held in its fixed position, it may, in spite of its nature, be eaten, or bitten, or licked or sucked, as swiftly, or slowly, and as much at one's leisure as one might please. These candies are usually sold at such places as parks, beaches, and promenades, at carnivals, expositions and fairs, and at various types of popular events, such as plays, song dramas, races, games, and kaissa matches. They are popular even with children.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 81


Indeed, as she wheedled with the guards, and would sometimes even receive a candy, many of us became quite jealous of her.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 82


Clarissa had been very popular with the guards. We were all, or those of us who had been with her in the former house, somewhat jealous, I suppose, of her attractiveness to them. We probably all wished we could have been that desirable. She had even received candies. I thought, however, that perhaps if I had not been forced to wear the iron belt, I, too, might have been similarly popular. I, too, might have received a candy or two.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 103


She had now learned that she was a slave, totally, and only, that. I was sure she would prove a marvelous purchase for a man. Even the guards, not easy to please, had given her candies.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 123


Much as men might throw us pastries or candies, so, too, we ourselves, in turn, or our uses, might be given to others.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 341


A tasta is a kind of small, sweet candy, usually sold at fairs. It is commonly mounted on a stick.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 148


A touch, a smile, a candy, a pastry, mean much to us.
We are kajirae.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 160


Once or twice in the pens I had been given a candy, a hard candy, and once, a part of a pastry.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 184


You may, if you wish, encourage her with small attentions and rewards. A candy, nibbled from the floor, on all fours, may be more effective than three stokes of the switch.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 714


Hooded slaves may also compete in various games, as in locating objects scattered about a room, arranging objects by size or weight, threading beads, fitting puzzle pieces together, a candy for the winner, a switch stroke for the losers, placing and tying sandals, plaiting binding fiber, braiding a whip, and such.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 325


In any event, venders of comestibles, biscuits, candy, fruit, and such, with their carts and trays, have been about, and doing their business, too.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 542


Then, at a sharp clapping of Mrs. Rawlinson's hands, we leapt up and hurried to the kitchen, to bring forth the fare, the sweets, the candies, the nuts, the bowls of fruit, the herbs, the bread, flat, circular loaves of bread, which would be divided into eight wedges, the many covered dishes of boiled vegetables and hot meat, the vessels of wine, and such, and placed these on the serving table from which place we began to serve the guests.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 32 - 33


"Allison," said Astrinax, "suppose that one of your sister slaves, in the kitchen, had been given a candy, perhaps as a tip from a customer, from waiting on the tables."

"Yes, Master?" I said.

Some of the customers, I knew, kept such small treats about their person, or in their pouches. These were usually hard candies, which might last a long time, slowly savored. Sometimes they would roll them on the floor and have a girl pursue them on all fours, putting her head down, and picking them up gratefully, in her teeth. Sometimes they would have the girl kneel at the bench, put back her head, her eyes closed, tightly, and open her mouth, widely. She does not know, strictly, if she is to be cuffed or rewarded, but, as you may suppose, she usually has an excellent sense as to how matters will fall out. If her service is thought to have been insufficiently prompt, diligent or deferent, and she is likely to suspect that, she may be struck. "Forgive me, Master," she then sobs, and is hastened about her duties, now intent on improving her service. At least she is not lashed. Usually, however, if so knelt, she is to be rewarded, a candy being placed in her mouth. "Thank you, Master," she breathes, licking and kissing the hand which has deigned to bestow so precious a gift upon her. How proud she is then, the possessor of so rare a treat, and how envied she will be amongst her chain sisters!
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 170 - 171


A few Ehn later I mentioned, "I have a candy."
"Oh?" she said.
"It is as large as a tiny tospit," I said, "hard, and yellow-and-red striped, and has a soft center."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 249


"Give me the candy," she said. "just for a little bit. I will not keep it. If it is hard, as you say, it will last a long time. I will give it back to you."

"It has a soft center," I said.

"No matter," she said.

"Very well," I said, and I freed the small candy from its wrapper, the candy and wrapper extracted from a tiny sleeve inside the hem of my tunic.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 253


Antiope holding the candy delicately, touched her tongue to the candy, her eyes closed.

"The bodies were not robbed," she said. "They were partly eaten."

"A larl then," I said, "or a sleen?"

"No," she said, "the larl, the sleen, kill in their own ways. Some of the bodies were crushed, others had the neck broken."

"You thought it came from the sewers?" I said.

"It is thought so," she said.

The candy disappeared into Antiope's mouth. "Good," she said.

"Make it last " I said. I wanted some of it back.

"I will," she said. She then removed it from her mouth, and again savored it tongue-wise. In this way it would last a very long time, as it would not too soon melt away. It is a trick of slaves.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 254


"What is in your mouth?" asked one of the guardsmen of Antiope.
"A candy, Master," she said.
"It is mine, Master," I said.
"Please do not take it away from us," said Antiope.
"Who would wish a candy which has been soiled by the mouth of a slave," said a guardsman.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 257


"Surely a master might throw her a candy, or give her a caress," I said.

"Yes," he said, "but such things are not owed to her. Rather, let her be grateful for any attention the master may give her."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 580


The first girl stands in the place of the master. It is her task to keep order amongst the other slaves, and she answers only to the master. I would suppose that most "first girls" are judicious and fair but some, doubtless, abuse their authority, have their favorites, distribute ornaments, cosmetics, silks, candies, pastries, delicacies, and such selectively, and make life miserable in a variety of ways for others, less favored, with respect to work assignments, discipline, and such, which matters are largely in her hands.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 383 - 384


The slave tunic, like most Gorean garments, lacks pockets. Tunics are inspected occasionally, and, if an internal pocket is discovered, or an open hem, where, say, a candy, let alone a tarsk-bit, might be concealed, the girl must expect to be punished, and, quite likely, severely.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 441





 


Caramel
To The Top


It had to do with "tastas" or "stick candies." These are not candies, incidentally, like sticks, as, for example, licorice or peppermint sticks, but soft, rounded, succulent candies, usually covered with a coating of syrup or fudge, rather in the nature of the caramel apple, but much smaller, and, like a caramel apple, mounted on sticks.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 81





 


Carrots
To The Top


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37





 


Cheese
To The Top


The Tarn Keeper, who was called by those in the tavern Mip, bought the food, bosk steak and yellow bread, peas and Torian olives, and two golden-brown, starchy Suls, broken open and filled with melted bosk cheese.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 168


Clitus, too, had brought two bottles of Ka-la-na wine, a string of eels, cheese of the Verr, and a sack of red olives from the groves of Tyros.

We greeted him with cheers.

Telima had prepared a roast tarsk, stuffed with suls and peppers from Tor.

There were great quantities of the yellow Sa-Tarna bread, in its rounded, six-part loaves.

We were served by the Kettle Slave, Telima. She poured paga for the men, and Ka-la-na for the women. She tore the bread for us, broke the cheese, ribboned the eels and cut the tarsk. She hurried from one to the other, and the musicians as well, scarcely serving one
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 114


Upon awakening I was served some bread and cheese in my cabin.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 265


The food had been good, bread and bosk meat, roasted, and cheese, and larma fruit.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 270


Merchants brought sides of bosk, and thighs of tarsk, and wines and fruits to camp, and cheeses and breads and nuts, and flowers and candies and silks and honeys.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 321


Dagmar had, two months ago, stolen a piece of cheese from Pretty Ankles; she had been beaten for that, at the post; fastened there by Ottar and switched by Pretty Ankles, until Pretty Ankles had tired of switching her, too; she had not been found sufficiently pleasing by several of the Forkbeard's oarsmen; she was, accordingly, to be sold off, as an inferior girl.

"Done," said the Forkbeard.

Dagmar was sold.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 158


I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine. I did not forget the slave, of course.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48


Outside the door I could smell cheese.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 116


Proteins, meat, kaiila milk, vulo eggs, verr cheese, require much water for their digestion. When water is in short supply, the nomads do not eat at all.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 226


We must serve the initial wines swiftly, with the matched breads and cheeses.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 300


I knelt before the table on the second balcony, placing the tray on the floor and quickly, deferentially, placing its contents on the table, the assorted meats and cheese, the sauces and fruits, and wines and nuts.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 330


In her hand there was a half of a yellow Gorean pear, the remains of a half moon of verr cheese imbedded in it.

Suddenly her wrist was seized by the girl, a tall, lovely girl, some four inches taller than she, in a brief white rag, who stood with her at the basket. "Who are you?" demanded the girl in the white rag. You are not one with us." She took the pear from her, with the verr cheese in it. "You have not laid with the paga attendants for your garbage," she said. "Get out!" Any woman, even a free woman, if she is hungry enough, will do anything. The paga attendants knew this. "Get out!" said the girl in the white rag.

Not unrelieved, though I do not think she understood much of what was said to her, the blond barbarian backed away. She reacted then, despite herself, with momentary horror, as the girl in the white rag bit thoughtlessly into the pear with verr cheese.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Pages 62 - 63


"Bring me bread and meat," I said to her.

"Me, too," said Callimachus, seeming to look through her, without really seeing her. She was only a girl who was owned, and must obey.

"Yes, Master," she said. Her lip trembled.

"Me, too," said Tasdron, "and, too, bring forth some cheese and dates."
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 230


"Masters," said Peggy, approaching the table, kneeling beside it, bearing a tray. She placed the tray on the table, and removed three plates of bread and meat from it, a dish of assorted cheeses, a bowl of dates, a pitcher of water, a pot of black wine, steaming, and tiny vessels of sugars and creams, and three goblets.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 233


Peggy knelt before the table and began to place the cups, the vessels and plates on the table. One plate was of meat, another of breads, another of sliced fruits, the fourth of nuts and cheeses. Each of us, with our fingers, would eat as we wished from the common plates. She had brought, too, paga, Cosian wine and water.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 257


"That should draw in bounty hunters," I said, "like zarlit flies to honey, urts to cheese, sharks to blood."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 301


Two men passed, drawing a dock cart, laden with weights of cheese, cradled in tur-pah.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 81


There was a small dairy which supplied verr milk, and processed it, as wished, into derivative products, primarily cheeses.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 164


And there would be, too, behind the counter, in baskets, grapes, tospits, larmas, nuts, and olives, and, in blocks, cheeses, and, in its amphorae to be lifted from its racks, cheap ka-la-na.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 251


My serving dish was shortly empty, and I knew I should withdraw to the kitchen, either to have it layered with more syrupped tospit slices, or supplied with another provender, perhaps rice, white, or brown, or red or purple, from Cos, or a plate of cheeses, from local dairies, served with warmed bread, or prepared after the fashion of Ti, rolled in honeyed tur-pah leaves.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 401





 


Cherries
To The Top


Some slave cosmetics are flavored. "Does Master enjoy my taste?" she asked. "The lipstick is flavored," I said. "I know," she said. "It reminds me of the cherries of Tyros," I said.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 349





 


Chestnuts
To The Top


"The small chestnuts are excellent," said Lord Yamada. "Dip them in honey."
"Indeed," I said.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 200


"I was not paying attention," I said. "Perhaps I was distracted by the honeyed chestnuts."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 210


I had dined well on roast vulo, rice, and chestnuts.
. . .
I had scarcely finished the final chestnut, which I had been saving for dessert, when I heard steps outside the door.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 485





 


Chocolate
To The Top


Girls would fight and tear at one another for a chocolate.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 216


Sometimes, before fellows were brought past the cell, bound or chained, thence to be incarcerated in one of the pits, I would be instructed to lie seductively on the furs and cushions. At such times I was sometimes given chocolates to eat. "Let them have something pleasant to remember," had said one of the fellows, at one of these times. "We would not want them to forget you," had said another.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 291





 


Chocolate - Drink
To The Top


"Mistress' drink is cold," said the girl. "Let me have it reheated or fetch you a fresh one."

"No," I said. "It is fine." I lifted the small, handleless bowl in two hands.
. . .

"This is warmed chocolate," I said, pleased. It was very rich and creamy.

"Yes, Mistress," said the girl.

"It is very good," I said.

"Thank you, Mistress," she said.

"Is it from Earth?" I asked.

"Not directly," she said. "Many things here, of course, ultimately have an Earth origin. It is not improbable that the beans from which the first cacao trees on this world were grown were brought from Earth."

"Do the trees grow near here?" I asked.

"No, Mistress," she said. "We obtain the beans, from which the chocolate is made, from Cosian merchants, who, in turn, obtain them in the tropics."
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Pages 60 - 61





 


Chokecherries
To The Top


"In Kantasawi," he said, "the moon when the plums are red." This was the moon following the next moon, which is known variously as Takiyuhawi, the moon in which the tabuk rut, or Canpasapawi, the moon when the chokecherries are ripe.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 253


The current moon was Takiyuhawi, the moon in which the tabuk rut. It is sometimes known also as Canpasapawi, or the moon when the chokecherries are ripe.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 5


"It is early," I said. It was not due in the country of the Kaiila until Kantasawi, the moon in which the plums become red. This was only Takiyuhawi, the moon in which the tabuk rut, or, as some call it, Canpasapawi, the moon in which the chokecherries are ripe.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 21 - 22


There are various ways in which pemmican may be prepared, depending primarily on what one adds into the mixture, in the way of herbs, seasonings and fruit. A common way of preparing it is as follows. Strips of kailiauk meat, thinly sliced and dried on poles in the sun, are pounded fine, almost to a powder. Crushed fruit, usually chokecherries, is then added to the meat. The whole, then, is mixed with, and fixed by, kailiauk fat, subsequently, usually, being divided into small, flattish, rounded cakes. The fruit sugars make this, in its way, a quick-energy food, while the meat, of course, supplies valuable, long-lasting stamina protein.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 46





 


Cinnamon
To The Top


"Do you smell it?" asked Ulafi.

"Yes," I said. "It is cinnamon and cloves, is it not?"

"Yes," said Ulafi, "and other spices, as well."

The sun was bright, and there was a good wind astern. The sails were full and the waters of Thassa streamed against the strakes.

It was the fourth morning after the evening conversation which Ulafi and I had had, concerning my putative caste and the transaction in Schendi awaiting the arrival of the blond-haired barbarian.

"How far are we out of Schendi?" I asked.

"Fifty pasangs," said Ulafi. We could not yet see land.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 98


The smell of spices, particularly cinnamon and cloves, was now quite strong. We had smelled these even at sea.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 109





 


Clams
To The Top


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Cloves
To The Top


There is little market in simple Laura for the more exquisite goods of Gor. Seldom will one find there Torian rolls of gold wire, interlocking cubes of silver from Tharna, rubies carved into tiny, burning panthers from Schendi, nutmegs and cloves, spikenard and peppers from the lands east of Bazi, the floral brocades, the perfumes of Tyros, the dark wines, the gorgeous, diaphanous silks of glorious Ar.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 86


"Do you smell it?" asked Ulafi.

"Yes," I said. "It is cinnamon and cloves, is it not?"

"Yes," said Ulafi, "and other spices, as well."

The sun was bright, and there was a good wind astern. The sails were full and the waters of Thassa streamed against the strakes.

It was the fourth morning after the evening conversation which Ulafi and I had had, concerning my putative caste and the transaction in Schendi awaiting the arrival of the blond-haired barbarian.

"How far are we out of Schendi?" I asked.

"Fifty pasangs," said Ulafi. We could not yet see land.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 98


The smell of spices, particularly cinnamon and cloves, was now quite strong. We had smelled these even at sea.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 109





 


Coast Gull
To The Top


"Meat is also available, Tarl Cabot tarnsman," he said. "I have seen to it. Coast gull, vulo, tarsk, verr, and mountain deer."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204





 


Condiments
To The Top


There was the odor of food in the kitchen, and of spilled drink. There were several yards of sausages hung on hooks; canisters of flour, sugars and salts; many smaller containers of spices and condiments. Two large wine jugs in one corner of the room. There were many closed pantries lining the walls, and a number of pumps and tubs on side. Some boxes and baskets of hard fruit were stored there.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 271


"Perhaps in your haste you have forgotten to season that," I said. "I prefer anyway to season my own porridge. See that you do not dare to present the porridge without the seasonings."

She cried out with misery.

"Bring condiments as well,"
. . .

Then the porridge, with the seasonings and condiments, was on the table.
. . .

I tasted the porridge. It had not yet been seasoned. Trying it, with one spoonful or another, from one vial or pot, or another, I seasoned it to my taste. I would later, now and then, here or there, in one place or another, mix in condiments. By such devices one obtains variety, or its deceptive surrogate, even in a substance seemingly so initially unpromising as inn porridge.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Pages 72 - 73





 


Confections
To The Top


Confections are commonly used by masters as rewards in the training and conditioning of their girls. Beyond this they may continue to function as control devices and incitements.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 216


Ellen did not know what a tasta was. Later she learned that it was a confection, a small, soft candy mounted on a stick.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 135


"You are no more than a tasta, a meaningless confection!" she said suddenly, angrily.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 391


One fellow was hawking tastas, which is a confection, mounted on a stick.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 100





 


Corn
To The Top


"Many of the tribes permit small agricultural communities to exist within their domains," she said. "The individuals in these communities are bound to the son and owned collectively by the tribes within whose lands they are permitted to live. They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 233 - 234


"Are you from a Waniyanpi compound?" I asked. The Waniyanpi, slaves of red savages, lived in tiny, isolated agricultural communities. They supplied their masters with corn and vegetables. They subscribed to a unisex ethos.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 131





 


Cosian Wine
To The Top


I had taken, as a share of battle loot, a hundred and ten bottles of Paga and forty bottles of Ka-la-na wine from Tyros, Cos and Ar,
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 275


One girl held back our head, and others, from goblets, gave us of wines, Turian wine, sweet and thick, Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes, from the terraces of Cos, wines even, Ka-la-nas, sweets and drys, from distant Ar.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 213


Free tarsk and roast bosk were being served, and Sa-Tarna bread and Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes of the Cosian terraces.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 98


It was a Ta wine, from the Ta grapes of the terraces of Cos.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 306


She had brought, too, paga, Cosian wine and water.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 257





 


Crabs
To The Top


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


One could smell fish. The early boats had come in. Grunt and parsit were strung between poles. Crabs were sold from baskets.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 68





 


Crackers
To The Top


Food is thrust in their mouths. It was generally dried fruit, crackers and a bit of salt, to compensate for the salt loss during the day's march, consequent on perspiration.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 226





 


Creams
To The Top


He sat, cross-legged, behind the low table. On it were hot bread, yellow sugars, slices of roast bosk, the scrambled eggs of vulos, pastries with creams and custards.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 20


In a few Ehn Lola returned with the tray, with the vessel of steaming liquid, the creams and sugars, the tiny cups, and the small spoons for mixing and measuring.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 132


"Masters," said Peggy, approaching the table, kneeling beside it, bearing a tray. She placed the tray on the table, and removed three plates of bread and meat from it, a dish of assorted cheeses, a bowl of dates, a pitcher of water, a pot of black wine, steaming, and tiny vessels of sugars and creams, and three goblets. On the table, too, she placed small spoons, of silver, from Tharna, for use with the black wine, and, at each place, a kailiauk-horn-handled eating prong, from distant Turia.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 233


The lovely little slave in bluish gauze, whom I had not yet named, holding the narrow-spouted, silver pouring vessel in a heavy cloth, to retain its heat and protect her hands, poured the scalding, steaming black fluid, in narrow, tiny streams, into the small cups. She poured into the cups only the amount that would be compatible with the assorted sugars and creams which the guest might desire, if any, these being added in, and stirred, if, and as, pertinent, by Aemilianus' slave, who directed the serving.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 244


"Second slave," I told her, which, among the river towns, and in certain cities, particularly in the north, is a way of indicating that I would take the black wine without creams or sugars, and as it came from the pouring vessel, which, of course, in these areas, is handled by the "second slave," the first slave being the girl who puts down the cups, takes the orders and sees that the beverage is prepared according to the preferences of the one who is being served.
. . .
The expression "second slave," incidentally, serves to indicate that one does not wish creams or sugars with one's black wine, even if only one girl is serving.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 245


I lifted the tiny silver cup to my lips and took a drop of the black wine. Its strength and bitterness are such that it is normally drunk in such a manner, usually only a drop or a few drops at a time. Commonly, too, it is mollified with creams and sugars. I drank it without creams and sugars, perhaps, for I had been accustomed, on Earth, to drinking coffee in such a manner, and the black wine of Gor is clearly coffee, or closely akin to coffee. Considering its bitterness, however, if I had not been drinking such a tiny amount, and so slowly, scarcely wetting my lips, I, too, would surely have had recourse to the tasty, gentling additives with which it is almost invariably served.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 247


We had finished the creams last night and, in any event, it was unlikely they would have lasted the night. If I had wanted creams I would have had to have gone to the market.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 295


I took the vessel of black wine, removing it from its warmer, and put it on its tray, that already bearing the tiny cups, the creams and sugars, the spices, the napkins and spoons. I then carried the tray, with the black wine, hot and steaming, to the table and put it down there.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Pages 405 - 406


They kept her in starvation three more days. Then they put her in a tiny cage, where she could not exercise, and could scarcely move, and, heavily, abundantly, every two hours, using the tube and ball, and the cruel plunger, using rich foods and creams, which she could not taste because of the tube, forced-fed her.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 68


"I find nothing wrong with your lines," I said. "To be sure, if a master wished, he might order them changed, and you might find yourself afflicted then with a sparse, strict diet and a frightening program of exercise. But similarly, if you were being examined on a mat in the Tahari you might find yourself regarded as insufficiently fleshy, and find yourself forced, under the whip, to eat rich creams and such, being thereby fattened for sale like a she-tarsk."
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 244


On the tray, tastefully arranged, with napkins, was a plate of small pastries, a saucer and cup, some sugars and creams, some spoons, and a small pot of coffee.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 32


Alcinoë, as she was Gorean, had the honor of bringing forth the vessel and cups, and my slave, as she was a barbarian, and thus subordinate, unless it was otherwise specified, brought forth the small pitcher of cream, the tiny spoons, and the small, flat bowls of sugars and spices. Later, each slave brought forth, as well, a tray of assorted cakes and pastries.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 579


"There are golden suls," said Lord Yamada "with butter and cream, from our own dairy."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 206


Steaming black wine, with its trays of sugars and creams, one of which I bore, and liqueurs, some apparently from as far away as Turia, were being served.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 403





 


Creamed Sauce
To The Top


It was a far cry from the provenders I had been taught to prepare in the house, ranging from roasted, seasoned bosk and tarsk and fresh plate breads, with honeys and butters, to frosted pastries and decadent, creamed sauces which, in some cities, were outlawed by sumptuary laws.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111





 


Custard
To The Top


"It will amuse me," he said, "to think of Tarl Cabot, laboring in the brine pits. As I rest in my palace, in the cool of the rooms, on cushions, relishing custards and berries, sipping beverages, delighted by my slave girls, among them your pretty Vella, I shall think of you, often, Tarl Cabot."
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 124


He sat, cross-legged, behind the low table. On it were hot bread, yellow sugars, slices of roast bosk, the scrambled eggs of vulos, pastries with creams and custards.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 20


The girls, carrying their trays, knelt before the table. "Desserts, Masters," announced the girl in bluish gauze. Then, rising, they began to serve, one on each side. On one tray were assorted pastries; on the other was a variety of small, spiced custards.
. . .
He was licking his lips. And I suspect it was not the custards on her tray which so moved his interest. Rather it was the first time that he had seen how beautiful she was in chains.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 239


"The dancers were lovely," said Glyco, pausing, a spoon lifted in the air over a small yellow, spiced custard.
. . .

"It is an interesting mode of dance," he said, plunging his spoon again into the custard, "one of which women are capable before men have taught them their collars."
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 240


The two slaves had now left the pastries and custards upon the table, and had returned to the kitchen.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 243





 


Dates
To The Top


About Kutaituchik there were piled various goods, mostly vessels of precious metal and strings and piles of jewels; there was silk there from Tyros; silver from Thentis and Tharna; tapestries from the mills of Ar; wines from Cos; dates from the city of Tor.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 42


The principal export of the oases are dates and pressed-date bricks. Some of the date palms grow to more than a hundred feet high. It takes ten years before they begin to bear fruit. They will then yield fruit for more than a century. A given tree, annually, yields between one and five Gorean weights of fruit. A weight is some ten stone, or some forty Earth pounds.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


A veiled woman was hawking dates by the tefa. A handful with the five fingers closed, not open, is a tef. Six such handfuls constitutes a tefa, which is a tiny basket. Five such baskets constitutes a huda.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 46


"Why are you bound for the Oasis of Nine Wells?" asked the captain.
"I have gems to sell Suleiman, your master," said I, "for bricks of pressed dates."
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 84


I had made certain I knew, within marketing ranges, the values of the stones, and what, within reason, they would bring in weights of pressed dates.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 88


As a portion of my assumed identity, I wished to sell him stones. Moreover, with the dates purchased by these, I hoped to have a suitable disguise, as a merchant in date bricks, in moving eastward.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 100 - 101


"Seventy weights of dates for the stones," said Suleiman to me. The price was fair, and good.
In his way, he was being magnanimous with me. He had bargained earlier, and had, in this, satisfied himself as a trader of the desert. It was now as Suleiman, Ubar and Pasha of Nine Wells, that he set his price. I had little doubt it was firm. He had cut through much haggling. Had he been truly interested in bargaining and dates I suspected I would not have been permitted to deal with him at all, but one of his commissary officers.

"You have shown me hospitality," I said, "and I would be honored if Suleiman Pasha would accept these unworthy stones for sixty weights."

Had it not been for Ibn Saran, I suspected I would not have been admitted even to the presence of the Pasha of Nine Wells.

He bowed. He called a scribe to him. "Give this merchant in gems," said he, "my note, stamped for eighty weights of dates."
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 108 - 109


"Bring me bread and meat," I said to her.

"Me, too," said Callimachus, seeming to look through her, without really seeing her. She was only a girl who was owned, and must obey.

"Yes, Master," she said. Her lip trembled.

"Me, too," said Tasdron, "and, too, bring forth some cheese and dates."
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 230


"Masters," said Peggy, approaching the table, kneeling beside it, bearing a tray. She placed the tray on the table, and removed three plates of bread and meat from it, a dish of assorted cheeses, a bowl of dates, a pitcher of water, a pot of black wine, steaming, and tiny vessels of sugars and creams, and three goblets.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 233


I fed her some dates, by hand, putting them in her mouth, from a tray of food I had brought up from the kitchen.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 294


We then, from the tray, feeding ourselves, taking dates, and slices of larma and pastries, breakfasted and chatted.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 295


Many are the markets of Gor, and some are supplied by contraband merchandise, of dubious origins, and evasive of taxes and harbor fees, such as rogue silver from the mines of Tharna, to be exported to Cos and Tyros, and the Farther Islands, even to the World's End; the beans from which Black-Wine is brewed, so carefully guarded by those of Thentis, famed for its tarn flocks, to be shipped as far south as Schendi, as far north as Torvaldsland; purple, dyed cloth from Tabor; dates from the Tahari;
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 243





 


Dried Berries
To The Top


She carried a bowl of dried berries.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 301





 


Dried Bosk
To The Top


even the girl was there who wore but bells and collar, struggling under her burden, long dried strips of bosk meat, as wide as beams,
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 34


We lunched on dried bosk meat and Paga and then he trooped to the wagon of Kutaituchik, where he exchanged pleasantries with the somnolent figure on the robe of gray boskhide, about the health of the bosk, the sharpness of quivas and the necessity of keeping wagon axles greased, and certain other matters.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 170


There was much grooming of wagon bosk, checking of harness and wagons, cutting of meat to be dried hanging from the sides of the moving wagons in the sun and wind.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 184


In the morning, before dawn, we awakened and fed on dried bosk meat, sucking the dew from the prairie grass.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 261


On the way to the compound I had met Harold and together we had eaten some dried bosk meat and drank water, from one of the commissary wagons attached to one of Hundreds in the city.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 307


My weapons shared the boat, with a gourd of water and a tin of bread and dried bosk meat.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 2


The dried bosk meat in the tin, and the bread with it, yellow Sa-Tarna bread, now stale, was almost gone.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 8


With them, her hair combed, warmed with a broth of dried bosk meat, heated in a copper kettle, over a fire on a rimmed iron plate, legged, set on another plate on the stern quarter, her hands tied behind her with simple binding fiber, had gone Aelgifu.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 75





 


Dried Eels
To The Top


It is perhaps a small thing to see on the belt of an artisan a silver buckle of the style worn in mountainous Thentis or to note the delicacy of dried eels from Port Kar in the marketplace, but these things, small though they are, speak to me of a new Tharna.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 248





 


Dried Fish
To The Top


From these raids the Wagon Peoples obtain a miscellany of goods which they are willing to barter to the Turians, jewels, precious metals, spices, colored table salts, harnesses and saddles for the ponderous tharlarion, furs of small river animals, tools for the field, scholarly scrolls, inks and papers, root vegetables, dried fish, powdered medicines, ointments, perfume and women, customarily plainer ones they do not wish to keep for themselves;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 57


She herself nibbled on a rence cake, watching me, and then on some dried fish which she drew also from the wallet.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 34


Then I shook out what food lay in the wallet, some dried rence paste from the day before yesterday, some dried flakes of fish, a piece of rence cake.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 65


In these first voyages I was content, quite, to carry tools and stone, dried fruit, dried fish, bolts of rep-cloth, tem-wood, Tur-wood and Ka-la-na stock, and horn and hides.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 138


Trade to the south, of course is largely in furs acquired from Torvaldsland, and in barrels of smoked, dried parsit fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 28


I saw small fruit trees, and hives, where honey bees were raised; and there were small sheds, here and there, with sloping roofs of boards; in some such sheds might craftsmen work; in others fish might be dried or butter made.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


Many goods pass in and out of Schendi, as would be the case in any major port, such as precious metals, jewels, tapestries, rugs, silks, horn and horn products, medicines, sugars and salts, scrolls, papers, inks, lumber, stone, cloth, ointments, perfumes, dried fruit, some dried fish, many root vegetables, chains, craft tools, agricultural implements, such as hoe heads and metal flail blades, wines and pagas, colorful birds and slaves.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 115


Tied in the canoe itself was a long, cylindrical basket of strips of salted, dried fish.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 268


Then I saw a handful of dried fish fly into the maw of one of the beasts. Ayari, his paddle discarded, was reaching into the cylindrical basket of dried fish, torn open, which had been among the supplies of the canoe. He hurled more fish to another tharlarion, which, with a snapping, popping noise, clamped shut its jaws on the salty provender. He similarly threw fish to the other two beasts.

"Hand me another paddle," I said to the first girl in the canoe. She was crouching, trembling, head down, in the bottom of the canoe.

"Perform, Slave," I said.

"Yes, Master," she whispered. She handed the paddle back to the blond-haired barbarian who, half in shock, numb, handed it back to me. She looked at me, frightened, and then looked away. I think she knew that she again belonged to me. I pulled the paddle from her fingers and passed it back to Kisu, who took it calmly. Kisu and I then began to propel the canoe eastward. Tende, wrists bound beneath her body, lay shuddering between Kisu and myself, in the bottom of the canoe. Ayari then threw bits of fish into the water, where the tharlarion must swim to them, to obtain them. He threw successive tidbits further and further away, behind the canoe. Then he scattered several scraps of fish at one time, in an arc behind the tharlarion. Kisu and I continued to propel the canoe from the vicinity. The tharlarion, distracted and feeding, did not follow.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Pages 274 - 275


The results of our trading had been two baskets of dried fish, a sack of meal and vegetables, a length of bark cloth, plaited and pounded, from the pod tree, dyed red, a handful of colored, wooden beads, and, most importantly, two pangas, two-foot-long, heavy, curve-bladed bush knives.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 287


Fishing villages, of course, share portions of their catch, fresh or dried, with their patrons and protectors, these goods gathered by low-level administrative officials.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 181


For example, a daimyo's taxation levied on his subject villages, as noted earlier, was usually done in terms of rice, or, if the village was a fishing village in terms of dried fish, or such.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 317





 


Dried Fruit
To The Top


In these first voyages I was content, quite, to carry tools and stone, dried fruit, dried fish, bolts of rep-cloth, tem-wood, Tur-wood and Ka-la-na stock, and horn and hides.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 138


The men are fed twice, once in the morning, once at night, when the hood is opened, and thrust up some inches to permit eating. Food is thrust in their mouths. It was generally dried fruit, crackers and a bit of salt, to compensate for the salt loss during the day's march, consequent on perspiration.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 226


A man handed me a bag of food. It contained dried fruit, biscuits, salt.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 267


Many goods pass in and out of Schendi, as would be the case in any major port, such as precious metals, jewels, tapestries, rugs, silks, horn and horn products, medicines, sugars and salts, scrolls, papers, inks, lumber, stone, cloth, ointments, perfumes, dried fruit, some dried fish, many root vegetables, chains, craft tools, agricultural implements, such as hoe heads and metal flail blades, wines and pagas, colorful birds and slaves.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 115


Of the two to one side, the yellowish vessels, one was a flattish bowl, which contained a crust and some meal; too, within it I was pleased to see what I thought were some slices of dried fruit; such things are often included in our diet; they are precious to us;
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 105


I fed, too, similarly, on the meal, and the crust. The slices of dried fruit I would save for later.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 126


When I was sure it was gone I went again to my belly, and to the food bowl. I put my head down and, delicately, bit off part of one of the pieces of dried fruit. I then ate it, treasuring it, even that small part, bit by bit, little by little, particle by particle. Then for a long time I fed there, bit by bit finishing the first of the three pieces, and then the second, similarly, and then the third. Such things, the slices of fruit, are very precious. I had saved them for last.
When I was finished, I rise, to all fours.

I had relished the fruit, dray as it was.

I was grateful that it had been given to me.

I then turned about and, for a time, on all fours, the blanket about me, faced the bars.

I heard a howling, far off. I did not know if it were the wind or some beast.

I was suddenly frightened, and lonely.

I hoped the men would be kind here. I would do my best not to displease them.

Surely they would be kind! They must be kind! Had I not been fed, had I not been given a blanket? Surely that was a kindness. My scent could always be taken otherwise. Had there not been three slices of dried fruit in the bowl?
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Pages 128 - 129


I picked up the food and water bowls, each replenished, the one, to my pleasure, even to three tiny pieces of dried fruit, called a larma, and put them in their place, to the left, at the back of the cell.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 135


Fel Doron passed her again, this time carrying supplies from the kitchen, bread, biscuits, dried fruit, a bulging sack of meal, which supplies he placed in a nearby tarn basket.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 335


While in the habitat village he also purchased supplies of various sorts, among them some biscuits and dried fruit, some vessels, some robes, three blankets, an ax, and two knives.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 370 - 371





 


Dried Kailiauk
To The Top


"Meat," said Cuwignaka.

Grunt and I exchanged glances but, in the end, we fetched Cuwignaka some of the strips of dried kailiauk meat.

He sat, cross-legged, in the grass, and ate some. "It is enough," he said. He thrust back the remainder to Grunt, who inserted it in the opened parfleche.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 328 - 329


"Wakapapi," said Cuwignaka to me. This is the Kaiila word for pemmican. A soft cake of this substance was pressed into my hands. I crumbled it. In the winter, of course, such cakes can be frozen solid. One then breaks them into smaller pieces, warms them in one's hands and mouth, and eats them bit by bit. I lifted the crumbled pemmican to my mouth and ate of it. There are various ways in which pemmican may be prepared, depending primarily on what one adds into the mixture, in the way of herbs, seasonings and fruit. A common way of preparing it is as follows. Strips of kailiauk meat, thinly sliced and dried on poles in the sun, are pounded fine, almost to a powder. Crushed fruit, usually chokecherries, is then added to the meat. The whole, then, is mixed with, and fixed by, kailiauk fat, subsequently, usually, being divided into small, flattish, rounded cakes. The fruit sugars make this, in its way, a quick-energy food, while the meat, of course, supplies valuable, long-lasting stamina protein. This, like the dried meat, or jerky, from which it is made, can be eaten either raw or cooked. It is not uncommon for both to be carried in hunting or on war parties. Children will also carry it in their play. The thin slicing of the meat not only abets its preservation, effected by time, the wind and sun, but makes it impractical for flies to lay their eggs in it. Jerky and pemmican, which is usually eaten cooked in the villages, is generally boiled. In these days a trade pot or kettle is normally used. In the old days it was prepared by stone-boiling. In this technique a hole is used. This hole, dug either within the lodge or outside of it, is lined with hide and filled with water. Fire-heated stones would then be placed in the water, heating it, eventually, to boiling. As the stones cooled, of course, they would be removed from the hide pot and replaced with hot stones, the first stones meanwhile, if needed, being reheated.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 46 - 47


On the way back to my lodge I passed a bargaining place, an open area serving for trading and exchanges, not unusual in an intertribal camp. There I saw Seibar, who had once been Pumpkin, of the Waniyanpi, trading, in sign, with a Dust-Leg warrior. Seibar was offering a netted sack of maize. The Dust Leg was bidding sheaves of dried kailiauk meat.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 473





 


Dried Larma
To The Top


He also gave me a slice of dried larma, some raisins and a plum.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 216


About the beasts' necks, and behind the saddles, hung panniers of grain and sacks of woven netting containing dried larmas and brown suls.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 36


I picked up the food and water bowls, each replenished, the one, to my pleasure, even to three tiny pieces of dried fruit, called a larma, and put them in their place, to the left, at the back of the cell.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 135





 


Dried Meat
To The Top


And there on that windy ledge, in that abode of the tarn, I ate the meal that satisfied me as no other had ever done, though it consisted only of some mouthfuls of water, some stale biscuits, and a wrapper of dried meat.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 144


We had eaten some foods we had brought with us, in our pouches, and, too, taken some food, bread and dried meat, which we had found in the huts.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 123


I found quantities of slave meal, which is mixed with water; and silks, and bowls, and collars, not inscribed, and lengths of dried meat, stretched and salted; and coils of rope and chains.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 210


Swiftly, frightened, she finished the bowl of slave meal and the piece of salted, dried meat.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 214


A handful of dried meat, cut in small pieces, was thrust in my mouth. Lying on my side I chewed and swallowed it. I had not realized how hungry I was.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 32

There were flasks of wine there, and bottles of the brew called paga; stores of salt, grains, dried meats and vegetables;
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 50

Toward noon I stopped to make a camp. I ate dried meat. I watched the small figure some two hundred yards behind me slowly approach.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 180


"I will eat out," I said.
"That is expensive," she said. "There is some bread and dried meat left."
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 115


Then I rose up and went to the storage box and took out some bread and dried meat. I chewed on it for a time. Then, finishing it, I wiped my mouth.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 117


"There is some food in the kitchen," I said. "I left some of the bread and dried meat. There is some money there, too. You could go to the market. Did you sleep?"
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 119


He drinks melted snow, held in his mouth until it is warm. He eats dried meat.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 36


We did not feel that his stomach would be ready yet for the meat of kailiauk. We had some from the Dust Legs. It was in sheets, cut almost as thin as paper, dried in the prairie sun, layered in a flat, leather envelope, a parfleche, originally sealed with a seam of hardened fat.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 328


Grunt and I exchanged glances but, in the end, we fetched Cuwignaka some of the strips of dried kailiauk meat.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 328


"Wakapapi," said Cuwignaka to me. This is the Kaiila word for pemmican. A soft cake of this substance was pressed into my hands. I crumbled it. In the winter, of course, such cakes can be frozen solid. One then breaks them into smaller pieces, warms them in one's hands and mouth, and eats them bit by bit. I lifted the crumbled pemmican to my mouth and ate of it. There are various ways in which pemmican may be prepared, depending primarily on what one adds into the mixture, in the way of herbs, seasonings and fruit. A common way of preparing it is as follows. Strips of kailiauk meat, thinly sliced and dried on poles in the sun, are pounded fine, almost to a powder. Crushed fruit, usually chokecherries, is then added to the meat. The whole, then, is mixed with, and fixed by, kailiauk fat, subsequently, usually, being divided into small, flattish, rounded cakes. The fruit sugars make this, in its way, a quick-energy food, while the meat, of course, supplies valuable, long-lasting stamina protein. This, like the dried meat, or jerky, from which it is made, can be eaten either raw or cooked. It is not uncommon for both to be carried in hunting or on war parties. Children will also carry it in their play. The thin slicing of the meat not only abets its preservation, effected by time, the wind and sun, but makes it impractical for flies to lay their eggs in it. Jerky and pemmican, which is usually eaten cooked in the villages, is generally boiled. In these days a trade pot or kettle is normally used. In the old days it was prepared by stone-boiling. In this technique a hole is used. This hole, dug either within the lodge or outside of it, is lined with hide and filled with water. Fire-heated stones would then be placed in the water, heating it, eventually, to boiling. As the stones cooled, of course, they would be removed from the hide pot and replaced with hot stones, the first stones meanwhile, if needed, being reheated.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 46 - 47


We threaded our way among the lodges, some of which were burned. Meat racks, with the sheets of dried meat, had been overturned.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 214


He lay in the darkness, in Grunt's lodge. I had wished to return to this lodge. There were objects in it which remained of interest to me. In it, too, were stocks of dried meat and Wakapapi, pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 268


He went somewhere in the room and returned with a piece of dried meat. He dropped it into the trunk, near my face. I seized it in my hands.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 235


I gave her some bread from my pack, from a rep-cloth draw-sack, and a bit of dried meat, paper thin, from its tied leather envelope.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 18


There were, of course, the pans, pots, utensils, lamps, pails, and such, which, on shelves and dangling from poles, she supposed might have suggested the name of the market, but there were also stalls, as well, specializing in many other forms of goods, for example, stalls of fruits and vegetables, and produce of various sorts, and sausages and dried meats, and stalls of tunics, cloaks, robes, veils, scarves, and simple cloth, and of leatherwork, belts and wallets, and such, and of footwear, oils, instruments of the bath, cosmetics and perfumes, and mats and coarse rugs, and such.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 230


The fire hole had been dug, and soon Darla with a fire drill and shredded tinder extracted from a pouch in one of the packs, and a number of small sticks removed from a wrapper in the same pack, had ignited a small blaze. She then, after adding some of our wood to the blaze, placed four stones about the blaze. On these stones she placed a small iron fire rack. Soon, then, a pot of sullage, tended by Tula was bubbling over the fire. Emerald put some dried meat from her pack into the brew and Hiza cast in two handfuls of our picked berries into the brew.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 293 - 294


They removed the silken covers and we noted the hampers were heaped with fruits, vegetables, cakes of rice, smoked fish, layers of dried, salted meat, and stoppered vessels which I supposed might contain sake, and perhaps, considering the continental mercenaries in the camp, none of whom had been permitted, save myself, to attend these proceedings, paga and ka-la-na.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 55





 


Dried Parsit
To The Top


Trade to the south, of course is largely in furs acquired from Torvaldsland, and in barrels of smoked, dried parsit fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 28


Like the bond-maids, she had been fed only on cold Sa-Tarna porridge and scraps of dried parsit fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 56


A number of slaves, too, some twenty or thirty, fastened together by the neck, by a long rope, had been given bags of water, bundles of dried parsit, sacks of rice, and such, to convey to the ship.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 408





 


Dried Precooked Meal
To The Top


Durbar left. In a few moments be returned with a small wooden bowl filled with dried, precooked meal. He poured some water into this. I was then handed the bowl.

Some of the women laughed.

"Mix it with your fingers," said the first man. Then he turned to Durbar. "Look about the camp," he said. "See if there are any more skulking about."

"I am alone," I told them.

But Durbar went to check.

I, mixing the water with the precooked meal, formed a sort of cold porridge or gruel. I then, with my fingers, and putting the bowl even to my lips, fed eagerly upon that thick, bland, moist substance.

By the time Durbar had returned I had finished, even to the desperate wiping and licking of the bowl, that I might secure every last particle of that simple, precious, vitalizing provender.

"You eat slave gruel well," said the first men. There was laughter from the chained women.

I put down my head. The bowl was taken from me. So, that was slave gruel, I thought. I knew that it, with its various supplements, was extremely nourishing. It had been designed for the feeding of slaves, to keep them healthy, sleek and trim. On the other hand, although I had devoured it eagerly, I could see where a slave who was not starving might, after a time, desperately strive to improve her services to the master, that he might see fit, in his kindness, to grant her at least the scraps of a more customary diet.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 257





 


Dried Rence Paste
To The Top


Then I shook out what food lay in the wallet, some dried rence paste from the day before yesterday, some dried flakes of fish, a piece of rence cake.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 65





 


Dried Tabuk
To The Top


Too, the families, coming north, had dragged and carried what dried tabuk meat they could with them.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 266





 


Dried Tarsk
To The Top


I then thrust some strips of dried tarsk meat in my belt. I called the lookout down from the basket, that I might climb to his place. In the basket I wrapped the admiral's cloak about me, began to chew on a piece of tarsk meat, as much against the cold as the hunger, and took out the glass of the builders.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 265


I was cold in the basket, and chewed on another piece of dried tarsk meat.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 268


"Bread, meat!" called a fellow, coming up beside the cart.

Several of us availed ourselves of his provender. I bought some wedges of Sa-Tarna bread and slices of dried tarsk meat, taking some and giving the rest to Boabissia and Hurtha.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 257


"Do not be stupid," said one of the men squatting across from him. "We have brought you a quarter of a dried tarsk. That is enough for you to chew on for a month."
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 382


The beast then regarded the men, who shrank back from it, their hands at the hilts of their swords but not daring to draw them. The beast then took the second body and threw it with the first, together with the quarter of a dried tarsk.

"Do not run," said the small fellow, quickly. "It will pursue you then. Stay here. Do not move. Do not draw your weapons. It is friendly. It will not hurt you."

The beast now crouched near the two bodies. Its mouth was red, and the fur about its jaw and snout. It looked up at the men, balefully, and a deep growl warned them back.

"Do not approach it closely," said the small fellow.

That I surmised was the last intent of the three men.

The beast then lowered its head, but its ears remained up. I think even a tiny sound, perhaps a movement of grass, might have been audible to it, certainly the slipping of steel from a scabbard.

I looked away, sick.

"There is little to fear," said the small fellow, "it prefers tarsk."

"It is not eating tarsk," said one of the men.

"It is hungry," said the small fellow. "Do not be harsh with it. The tarsk is dried. The other is fresh. You should have brought more meat."
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 389 - 390


Fortunately I had some dried tarsk strips in my pack. I did not know if the Lady Phoebe would find these appealing or not but she would learn to eat them.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 137


The strips of meat he was given were from wild tarsk, and had been dried, being hung from branches.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 183





 


Dried Tospit
To The Top


On the back of the kaiila, the black lance in hand, bending down in the saddle, I raced past a wooden wand fixed in the earth, on the top of which was placed a dried tospit, a small, wrinkled, yellowish-white peachlike fruit, about the size of a plum, which grows on the tospit bush, patches of which are indigenous to the drier valleys of the western Cartius. They are bitter but edible.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 59





 


Eel
To The Top


It is perhaps a small thing to see on the belt of an artisan a silver buckle of the style worn in mountainous Thentis or to note the delicacy of dried eels from Port Kar in the marketplace, but these things, small though they are, speak to me of a new Tharna.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 248


One dish I recall was composed of the tongues of eels and was sprinkled with flavored aphrodisiacs,
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 204


"What were you before?" I asked.
"An eel fisher," he said.
"What city?"
"The Isle of Cos," he said.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 84


Clitus, too, had brought two bottles of Ka-la-na wine, a string of eels, cheese of the Verr, and a sack of red olives from the groves of Tyros.
. . .
We were served by the Kettle Slave, Telima. She poured paga for the men, and Ka-la-na for the women. She tore the bread for us, broke the cheese, ribboned the eels and cut the tarsk.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 114


A man walked by carrying a long pole, from which dangled dozens of the eels of Cos.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 343


Many estates, particularly country estates, have pools in which fish are kept. Some of these pools contain voracious eels, of various sorts, river eels, black eels, the spotted eel, and such, which are Gorean delicacies.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 428


Perhaps, even, the container might have been slowly filled with mud or sand, or with fast-growing poisonous molds, or with dark water, in which swam the tiny, razor-teethed eels kept in large pools at the palatial villas of some Gorean oligarchs, both as a delicacy, and as a standing admonition to slaves, to which swift, snakelike, voracious creatures they may be thrown.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 43 - 44


Shortly thereafter two fellows passed, bearing a pole between them, from which hung gutted, salted harbor eels.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 81


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Eel Tongue
To The Top


One dish I recall was composed of the tongues of eels and was sprinkled with flavored aphrodisiacs, the latter however being wasted on me as I spent, to Elizabeth's consternation, the night lying on my side in great pain.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 204





 


Eggs
To The Top


She had been carrying a wicker basket containing vulos, domesticated pigeons raised for eggs and meat.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 1


"And put bread over the fire," I said, "and honey, and the eggs of vulos, and fried tarsk meat and a Torian larma fruit."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 106


Wild marsh gants, captured, even as young as gantlings, cannot be domesticated, on the other hand, eggs, at the hatching point, gathered from floating gant nests, are sometimes brought to the island;
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Pages 16 - 17


The sand in the lower hold is usually quite cool, and, buried in it, are commonly certain perishables, such as eggs, and bottled wines.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 20


A fellow walked past me, carrying several vulos, alive, heads down, their feet tied together. He was followed by another fellow, carrying a basket of eggs.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 40


Soon I smelled the frying of vulo eggs in a large, flat pan, and the unmistakable odor of coffee, or as the Goreans express it, black wine.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 73


Eta piled several of the hot, tiny eggs, earlier kept fresh in cool sand within the cave, on a plate, with heated yellow bread, for him.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 74


He sat, cross-legged, behind the low table. On it were hot bread, yellow sugars, slices of roast bosk, the scrambled eggs of vulos, pastries with creams and custards.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 20


I grinned, and washed down the eggs with a swig of hot black wine, prepared from the beans grown upon the slopes of the Thentis mountains.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 21


I stepped aside to let a young girl pass, who carried two baskets of eggs, those of the migratory arctic gant. They nest in the mountains of the Hrimgar and in steep, rocky outcroppings, called bird cliffs, found here and there jutting out of the tundra. The bird cliffs doubtless bear some geological relation to the Hrimgar chains. When such eggs are frozen they are eaten like apples.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 196


With them, too, they had brought eggs and berries, and many other things, spoils from the summer, though not all for the larder, such as horn and sinew, and bones and hides.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 266


Before each guests there were tiny slices of tospit and larma, small pastries, and, in a tiny golden cup, with a small golden spoon, the clustered, black, tiny eggs of the white grunt.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Pages 275 - 276


"The milk of verr, the eggs of vulos!" I heard call.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 68


I skirted a large cooking area. I could smell freshly baked bread, and the cooking of eggs and meat.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 201


"Excellent vulo eggs, excellent tarsk," said Boots, his mouth full.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 211


"Thank you," I said, and sat down with them, cross-legged. It was still rather early. Soon I was helping myself to a heaping serving of vulo eggs, tarsk strips and rolls.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 212


I slowly, carefully, piled a plate high with rolls, eggs and fried vulo strips.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 213


The vulo is a small, soft, usually white, pigeonlike bird. It is the most common form of domestic fowl kept on this world. It is prized for its mean and eggs.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 148


The most interesting cargo I noted being disembarked from the great ship, a cargo handled with great gentleness, and one not surrendered to the lower Pani, but to warriors, were the eggs of tarns. Each was given to a single warrior, who bowed to the egg courteously, wrapped it in silk, and then began to mount the trail to the castle. I would later learn there had been a much larger number of eggs, but many had perished on the vessel, and been cast overboard. Several had apparently been stolen or destroyed in the mutiny. Some had been broken into, for food.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 368


I had breakfasted well, on larma, vulo eggs, fried sul, roast bosk, sa-tarna, and even black wine, the beans for which, I supposed, derived from the far slopes of the Thentis mountains, and may have been brought west at some risk.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 76





 


Falarian Wine
To The Top


"Among these petitioners came one fellow bringing with him the promise of a gift of wine, a wine supposedly secret, the rare Falarian, a wine only rumored among collectors to exist, a wine supposedly so rare and precious that its cost might purchase a city. She, of course, would test this. She, though only a slave, would choose to sip it."
. . .
Can this wine, which seems like a cheap ka-la-na, be the rare Falarian?
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 158 - 159


"There will be delicacies from as far away as Bazi and Anango," she said, "and we shall open vessels of Falarian from the private stores of the Ubar."
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 156





 


Fermented Milk Curds
To The Top


By one fire I could see a squat Tuchuk, hands on hips, dancing and stamping about by himself, drunk on fermented milk curds, dancing, according to Kamchak, to please the sky.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 28





 


Flavored Ices
To The Top


The High Initiate had risen to his feet and accepted a goblet from another Initiate, probably containing minced, flavored ices, for the afternoon was warm.
. . .
Free women, here and there, were delicately putting tidbits beneath their veils. Some even lifted their veils somewhat to drink of the flavored ices. Some low-caste free women drank through their veils and there were yellow and purple stains on the rep-cloth.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 141





 


Flour
To The Top


"Kajuralia!" cried the slave girl hurling a basket of Sa-Tarna flour on me, and turning and running.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 223


There was the odor of food in the kitchen, and of spilled drink. There were several yards of sausages hung on hooks; canisters of flour, sugars and salts; many smaller containers of spices and condiments. Two large wine jugs in one corner of the room. There were many closed pantries lining the walls, and a number of pumps and tubs on side. Some boxes and baskets of hard fruit were stored there.

I could see the bread ovens in one wall; the long fire pit over which could be put cooking racks, the mountings for
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 271


Thyri herself, her kirtle thrown to her, was ordered to pound grain to make flour;
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 193


Flour from rent sacks had been scattered on the grass.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 267


Grunt, from his own stores, brought forth some dried, pressed biscuits, baked in Kailiauk from Sa-Tara flour.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 328


Five days ago I had been returning to the camp of Boots Tarsk-Bit, coming back from a nearby village where I had gone to fetch Sa-Tarna grain, from which the girls, back at the camp, using stones and flat rocks, sifters and pans, would produce flour. This was somewhat cheaper than buying the flour directly, for then one must pay the cost of the peasant women's work or that of its millage.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 258


"You have bread!" wept one. This was true, of course. The wagon's lading was Sa-Tarna bread, and also, incidentally, Sa-Tarna meal and flour. It creaked under perhaps a hundred and fifty Gorean stone of such stores.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 27


This was a reference to an old form of grinding, for some reason still attributed to Priest-Kings, in which a pestle, striking down, is used with a mortar. Most Sa-Tarna is now ground in mills, between stones, the top stone usually turned by water power, but sometimes by a tharlarion, or slaves. In some villages, however, something approximating the old mortar and pestle is sometimes used, the two blocks, a pounding block strung to a springy, bent pole, and the mortar block, or anvil block. The pole has one or more ropes attached to it, near its end. When these are drawn downward the pounding block descends into the mortar block, and the springiness of the pole, of course, straightening, then raises it for another blow. More commonly, however, querns are used, usually, if they are large, operated by two men, if smaller, by two boys. Hand querns, which may be turned by a woman, are also not unknown.

The principle of the common quern is as follows: it consists primarily of a mount, two stones, an overhead beam and a pole. The two stones are circular grinding stones. The bottom stone has a small hub on its upper surface which fits into an inverted concave depression in the upper stone. This helps to keep the stones together. It also has shallow, radiating surface grooves through which the grindings may escape between the stones, to be caught in the sturdy boxlike mount supporting the stones, often then funneled to a waiting receptacle or sack. The upper stone has two holes in it, in the center a funnel-shaped hole through which grain is poured, and, near the edge, another hole into which one end of the turning pole is placed. This pole is normally managed by two operators. Its upper portion is fitted into an aperture in the overhead beam, which supplies leverage and, of course, by affording a steadying rest, makes the pole easier to handle. The principle of the hand quern is similar, but it is usually turned with a small wooden handle. The meal or flour emerging from these devices is usually sifted, as it must often be reground, sometimes several times. The sifter usually is made of hide stretched over a wooden hoop. The holes are punched in the hide with a hot wire.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Pages 17 - 18


Coins, or letters of credit, might be concealed about a wagon, but it is not easy to conceal quantities of flour, salt, jerky, paga and such, not to mention the miscellany of diverse items for the field supply of which one can usually count on the sutlers, such things as combs, brushes, candles, lamp-oil, small knives, common tools, pans, eating utensils, sharpening stones, flints, steel, thumb cuffs, shackles, nose rings, binding fiber, slave collars and whips.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Pages 113 - 114


We have been long at sea. Meat and flour are short.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 311


I leaned against the heavy horizontal pole, chest high, inserted through the large, conical stone. It, like its two similar poles, passed through the stone and emerged on the other side. This produced, given the penetrations, the effect of six poles, against which weight might be pressed, this turning the heavy stone. The miller's man, at intervals, from his ladder, would pour the grain, sa-tarna, the "life daughter," into the opening on the top of the stone, and the stone, when turning, would press down upon it, and grind it, the resultant flour, by means of three descending troughs, being gathered in waiting sacks.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 138


We welcomed the moments when new grain was poured into the feeding aperture atop the stone. Too, sometimes a pole would snap. This, too, meant a surcease of effort. The stone was large, and heavy. It ground coarsely. There were, about the yard, smaller stones, as well, some of which could be turned by a single girl, kneeling near it. In this way our basic mill produced flour that could be reworked, if one wished, to different varieties of fineness, which would then be priced differently, being addressed to different markets.
. . .
He owned other girls, as well, of course, who had their different employments about the mill, turning the smaller stones, grading and sacking flour, sewing and marking sacks, loading carts, accompanying the drivers, when they made deliveries, and so on.
. . .
For the most part, however, sa-tarna, harvested and threshed, was brought in by peasants, milled, and carried away by peasants. The fee for the milling was in tarsk-bits, but, most commonly, it was taken in kind, a portion of the flour going to the miller, who might then market it as his own.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 140





 


Fried Fish
To The Top


I had carried about bowls of cut, fried fish, and wooden trays of roasted tarsk meat, and roasted gants, threaded on sticks, and rence cakes and porridges, and gourd flagons, many times replenished, of rence beer.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 44





 


Fried Larma
To The Top


"Another bit of larma, Master?" asked the slave, kneeling behind me and to my left. I turned and, from where I sat cross-legged behind the low table, removed a small, crisp disk of fried larma, with a browned-honey sauce, from the silver tray.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 231





 


Frozen Blood
To The Top


He took his kayak to the side of the beast. With wooden plugs he began to stop up the wounds. He did not wish to lose what blood might be left in the animal. Frozen blood is nutritious.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 287





 


Fruit
To The Top


The fruit grapes and peaches of some sort was fresh and as cold as mountain snow.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 26


Lastly, as the culmination of Ar's Planting Feast, and of the greatest importance to the plan of the Council of Ko-ro-ba, a member of the Ubar's family goes to the roof at night, under the three full moons with which the feast is correlated, and casts grain upon the stone and drops of a red winelike drink made from the fruit of the Ka-la-na tree.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 68


At first even the countryside was depressing, for the men of Ar, as a military policy, had devastated an area of some two or three hundred pasangs on their borders, cutting down fruit trees, filling wells, and salting the fertile areas.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 73


"Over there," I said, "are some Ka-la-na trees. Wait here and I'll gather some fruit."
"No, I'll come with you - if you permit me," she said.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 96


I picked some Ka-la-na fruit and opened one of the packages of rations. Talena returned and sat beside me on the grass. I shared the food with her.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 106


In the next few days, to my surprise, Talena was buoyant, cheerful, and excited. She became interested in the caravan and would spend hours walking alongside the colored wagons, sometimes hitching rides with the strap-masters, wheedling from them a piece of fruit or a sweetmeat.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 128


Gor, sparsely inhabited by human beings, teems with animal life, and in the next weeks I had no difficulty in living by hunting. I supplemented my diet with fresh fruit picked from bushes and trees, and fish speared in Gor's cold, swift-flowing streams.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 48


The principal ingredients of Sullage are the golden Sul, the starchy, golden-brown vine-borne fruit of the golden-leaved Sul plant; the curled, red, ovate leaves of the Tur-Pah, a tree parasite, cultivated in host orchards of Tur trees, and the salty, blue secondary roots of the Kes Shrub, a small, deeply rooted plant which grows best in sandy soil.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Pages 44 - 45


there was a yellow stain about her mouth where she had been fed some fruit;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 42


On the back of the kaiila, the black lance in hand, bending down in the saddle, I raced past a wooden wand fixed in the earth, on the top of which was placed a dried tospit, a small, wrinkled, yellowish-white peachlike fruit, about the size of a plum, which grows on the tospit bush, patches of which are indigenous to the drier valleys of the western Cartius. They are bitter but edible.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 59


The judge showed the point of the lance. There was a tiny stain of blood at its tip, and too there was a smear of blood on the skin of the small yellowish-white fruit.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 81


Saphrar reclined on the yellow cushions, behind the low table covered with wines, fruits and golden dishes heaped with delicate viands.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 85


The wagon girls, watching this, some of them chewing on fruit or stalks of grass, jeered.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 117


"Odd or even?" he asked.

I had resolved not to wager with Kamchak, but this was indeed an opportunity to gain a certain amount of vengeance which, on my part, would be sorely appreciated. Usually, in guessing tospit seeds, one guesses the actual number, and usually both guessers opt for an odd number. The common tospit almost invariably has an odd number of seeds. On the other hand the rare, long-stemmed tospit usually has an even number of seeds. Both fruits are indistinguishable outwardly. I could see that, perhaps by accident, the tospit which Kamchak had thrown me had had the stem twisted off. It must be then, I surmised, the rare, long-stemmed tospit.

"Even," I said.

Kamchak looked at me as though pained. "Tospits almost always have an odd number of seeds," he said.

"Even," I said.

"Very well," said he, "eat the tospit and see."

"Why should I eat it?" I asked. The tospit, after all, is quite bitter. And why shouldn't Kamchak eat it? He had suggested the wager.

"I am a Tuchuk," said Kamchak, "I might be tempted to swallow seeds."

"Let's cut it up," I proposed.

"One might miss a seed that way," said Kamchak. "Perhaps we could mash the slices," I suggested.

"But would that not be a great deal of trouble," asked Kamchak, "and might one not stain the rug?"

"Perhaps we could mash them in a bowl," I suggested.

"But then a bowl would have to be washed," said Kamchak.

"That is true," I admitted.

"All things considered," said Kamchak, "I think the fruit should be eaten."

"I guess you are right," I said.

I bit into the fruit philosophically. It was indeed bitter.

"Besides," said Kamchak, "I do not much care for tospits."

"I am not surprised," I said.

"They are quite bitter," said Kamchak.

"Yes," I said.

I finished the fruit and, of course, it had seven seeds.

"Most tospits," Kamchak informed me, "have an odd number of seeds."

"I know," I said.

"Then why did you guess even?" he asked.

"I supposed," I grumbled, "that you would have found a long-stemmed tospit."

"But they are not available," he said, "until late in the summer."

"Oh," I said.

"Since you lost," pointed out Kamchak, "I think it only fair that you pay the admission to the performance."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 149 - 150


Harold looked the girls over and then he went to the low table and poured himself a drink, Ka-la-na wine by the smell of it. He then picked up a juicy, red larma fruit, biting into it with a sound that seemed partly crunching as he went through the shell, partly squishing as he bit into the fleshy, segmented endocarp. He seemed to make a great deal of noise. Although one or two of the girls stirred uneasily, none, to my relief, awakened.

Harold was now fishing about, still chewing on the fruit, in a wooden chest at one end of the table. He drew out of the chest some four silken scarves, after rejecting some others which did not sufficiently please him.

Then he stood up and went to where one of the girls lay curled on the thick red carpet.

"I rather like this one," he said, taking a bite out of the fruit, spitting some seeds to the rug.

She wore yellow Pleasure Silk, and, beneath her long black hair, on her throat, I glimpsed a silverish Turian collar. She lay with her knees drawn up and her head resting on her left elbow. Her skin color was tannish, not too unlike the girl I had seen from Port Kar. I bent more closely. She was a beauty, and the diaphanous Pleasure Silk that was the only garment permitted her did not, by design, conceal her charms. Then, startled, as she moved her head a bit, restlessly on the rug, I saw that in her nose was the tiny golden ring of a Tuchuk girl.

"This is the one," Harold said.

It was, of course, Hereena, she of the First Wagon.

Harold tossed the emptied, collapsed shell of the larma fruit into a corner of the room and whipped one of the scarves from his belt.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 219 - 220


Kuurus pointed to a fruit on a flat-topped wagon with wooden wheels, drawn by a small four-legged, horned tharlarion.

The peddler pressed the fruit into his hands and hurried on, not meeting his eyes.
. . .

Biting into the fruit, the juice running at the side of his mouth, Kuurus studied the girl. It seemed she would turn to leave but his eyes held her where she stood. He spit some seeds to the dust of the street within the gate. When he had finished he threw the core of the fruit to her feet and she looked down at it with horror. When she looked up, frightened, she felt his hand on her left arm.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 7


"And put bread over the fire," I said, "and honey, and the eggs of vulos, and fried tarsk meat and a Torian larma fruit."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 106


I heard a movement near us. I turned and saw a female slave, in a rep-cloth kitchen tunic, stained with food, approaching, bearing a tray of fruit with a flask of wine. She was followed by a guard.
. . .
The prisoner now seemed in a better mood. There was a new haughtiness in her movements. She looked down at the tray of fruit and wine and laughed, and picked up a fruit and bit into it, smiling.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 183


There was the odor of food in the kitchen, and of spilled drink. There were several yards of sausages hung on hooks; canisters of flour, sugars and salts; many smaller containers of spices and condiments. Two large wine jugs in one corner of the room. There were many closed pantries lining the walls, and a number of pumps and tubs on side. Some boxes and baskets of hard fruit were stored there.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 271


Again he came under the table, and this time his hand darted out and back, and he began to chew on his prize, a peel of larma fruit snatched from a plate, discarded as garbage. He was grinning and cooing to himself while chewing on the peel.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 321


On these voyages my cargos were varied. I did not, however, in this early period, because of the cost, purchase cargos of great value. Accordingly I did not carry, in these first voyages, any abundance of precious metals or jewels; nor did I carry rugs or tapestries, or medicines, or silks or ointments, or perfumes or prize slaves, or spices or canisters of colored table salts. In these first voyages I was content, quite, to carry tools and stone, dried fruit, dried fish, bolts of rep-cloth, tem-wood, Tur-wood and Ka-la-na stock, and horn and hides.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 138


There is nothing to be frightened of, I told myself. There is food here, and water. I had found berries, and there were doubtless other things to eat, fruits and nuts.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 45


I did not care particularly for the wooden bowls of stew and bread we commonly had at the public pens, but I was hungry and ready to eat even such, and with enthusiasm. In the private pens we were given better food, lean meats and vegetables and fruits, and, if our group had trained acceptably, after the evening meal, before being returned, hooded, to the public pens, we would be given candies or pastries, or, sometimes, a swallow of Ka-la-na wine.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 163


I followed the stream for an Ahn, sometimes stopping to lift my head to overhanging branches, to nibble at hanging fruit.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 182


Here and there, among the wagons, leashed, clad in short woolen skirts, heavy bands of iron hammered about their throats, under the guard of huntsmen, cowled in the heads of forest panthers, there walked male slaves, male outlaws captured by Marlenus and his hunters in the forest. They had long, shaggy black hair. Some carried heavy baskets of fruits and nuts on their shoulders, or strings of gourds; others bore wicker hampers of flowers, or carried brightly plumaged forest birds, tied by string to their wrists.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 210


A cart was passing, flanked by huntsmen and slaves, bearing their burdens of gourds, flowers, nuts and fruits.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 213


Behind the cage I reached in and stole the food she had in the cage, two larma fruit lying, split, on its metal floor. I bit into one and tossed the other to Lana, who, too, ate it.
When we had finished the fruit, Lana and I discarded the skin and seeds.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 222


I, however, contented myself with nuts and fruits, and roots, and water creatures which resembled those with which I was familiar, and, of course, the flesh of small birds and animals.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 236 - 237


Mostly I ate fruits and nuts, and some roots. Occasionally I would supplement this diet with the raw flesh of small birds, or that of an occasional brush urt, which I would manage to snare.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 247


Yesterday, by slave girls, under the direction of Ena, who was high girl, I had been washed and combed, and then fed. The food had been good, bread and bosk meat, roasted, and cheese, and larma fruit. I, famished from my trials in the wilderness, had fed well. I had even been given a swallow of Ka-la-na wine, which exquisite beverage I had not tasted since the time of my capture, long ago, by Verna outside of Targo's compound.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 270


A guard was with us, and we were charged with filling our leather buckets with ram-berries, a small, reddish fruit with edible seeds, not unlike tiny plums, save for the many small seeds.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 305


Merchants brought sides of bosk, and thighs of tarsk, and wines and fruits to camp, and cheeses and breads and nuts, and flowers and candies and silks and honeys.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 321


From the garment, to the sand about her ankles, there fell several small Gorean plums, a small larma fruit and two silver tarsks.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 92


We took the prisoners to a nearby stream and watered them. We then let them, with their teeth, pick fruit from low-hanging branches.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 208


"Then gather fruit and nuts for them," said the red-haired girl.
"Yes, Mistress," said Ilene.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 224


Their food is that of a galley slave, peas, black bread and onions. If they serve well, however, their customers often bring them a bit of meat or fruit.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 304


I saw small fruit trees, and hives, where honey bees were raised; and there were small sheds, here and there, with sloping roofs of boards; in some such sheds might craftsmen work; in others fish might be dried or butter made.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


The tospits, in the Forkbeard's orchard, which can grow at this latitude, as the larma cannot, were too green to eat. I smiled, recalling that tospits almost invariably have an odd number of seeds, saving the rarer, long-stemmed variety. I do not care too much for tospits, as they are quite bitter. Some men like them. They are commonly used, sliced and sweetened with honey, and in syrups, and to flavor, with their juices, a variety of dishes. They are also excellent in the prevention of nutritional deficiencies at sea, in long voyages, containing, I expect, a great deal of vitamin C. They are sometimes called the seaman's larma. They are a fairly hardfleshed fruit, and are not difficult to dry and store. On the serpents they are carried in small barrels, usually kept, with vegetables, under the overturned keel of the longboat.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 102


"There are many things I do not understand," said Samos to me. I reached for a slice of larma fruit, and bit through it. "Yet," said Samos, "I think it is important that we come to the truth in this matter."
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 7


Some of the date palms grow to more than a hundred feet high. It takes ten years before they begin to bear fruit. They will then yield fruit for more than a century. A given tree, annually, yields between one and five Gorean weights of fruit.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


He was veiled, in the manner of the Char, as were the others with him. He picked a grape from a bowl of fruit on a small table near him, and, holding the veil from his face, as do the men of the Char, put the bit of fruit into his mouth, and bit into it. It was pitted. He chewed on the fruit.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 211


On the dais, with him, were several men, low tables of food, fruit, stews, tidbits of roast verr, assorted breads.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 212


Food is thrust in their mouths. It was generally dried fruit, crackers and a bit of salt, to compensate for the salt loss during the day's march, consequent on perspiration.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 226


A man handed me a bag of food. It contained dried fruit, biscuits, salt.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 267


I knelt before the table on the second balcony, placing the tray on the floor and quickly, deferentially, placing its contents on the table, the assorted meats and cheese, the sauces and fruits, and wines and nuts.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 330


"Do you think you could make me kneel to you?" asked a girl sitting on a platform, with chained neck and ankles, her knees drawn up, chewing on a larma fruit. She smiled at me, over the fruit. Then she turned white. "Forgive me, Master!" she cried. She had seen my eyes. She knelt before me on the boards, trembling, her head down. Would she be permitted to live? The fruit lay discarded beside her. I took the fruit and bit into it. I watched her for a time, and then I said, "Lift your head." She did so. I threw the fruit back to her, and she, fearfully, caught it. She held it in her hands, looking at me. "Finish it," I said, "and then, for an Ahn, lie on your belly." "Yes, Master," she said.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Pages 54 - 55


Many goods pass in and out of Schendi, as would be the case in any major port, such as precious metals, jewels, tapestries, rugs, silks, horn and horn products, medicines, sugars and salts, scrolls, papers, inks, lumber, stone, cloth, ointments, perfumes, dried fruit, some dried fish, many root vegetables, chains, craft tools, agricultural implements, such as hoe heads and metal flail blades, wines and pagas, colorful birds and slaves.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 115


I thrust it, some bread and fruit, in her mouth, while she had knelt in the position of the pleasure slave. This is something done with a girl in her first feeding, or feedings, and may, upon occasion, be repeated.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 197


We had obtained in the trading, for some knives and colored glass, several sacks of meal, fruit and vegetables.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 303


A slave girl passed, a short-legged beauty, clad in a gray rag, chewing on a larma fruit. She spit against the wall as I passed.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 174


The girl lifted her head then and, timidly, lifted the ripe, rounded fruit which she held in her hands, Gorean peaches and plums, to me. Her eyes met mine, and then she looked down, blushing. I then understood the purpose of the gathering of her brief yellow garment at her breasts, lifting them, sweet, rounded and swelling, for the inspection and delectation of masters. In her gesture, her offering of the fruit, it was clearly understood that she was offering to me as well the lovely fruits of her service and beauty.

I took one of the peaches and bit into it, watching her. She shuddered.

"You are dismissed," said Policrates.

"Yes, Master," she said, frightened, and rising quickly, lightly, hurried away, barefoot on the tiles, to serve others.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Pages 194 - 195


One plate was of meat, another of breads, another of sliced fruits, the fourth of nuts and cheeses. Each of us, with our fingers, would eat as we wished from the common plates.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 257


There is a shallow trough for water, cut in the stone, near one wall, where we would be chained when not working. This is filled twice daily. Too, at the wall, we would be thrown crusts of bread, and scraps of meat and fruit, usually the garbage of the feasts of pirates, our captors.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 291


I glanced outside. The smell of fruit and vegetables, and verr milk, was strong. I also heard the chatter of women. Dozens of women were spreading their blankets, and their wares, on the cement. There are many such markets in Port Kar. Men and women come to them in small boats. Also, of course, sometimes the vendors, too, will merely tie up their boats near the side of the canal, particularly when the space on the cement is crowded. The markets, thus, tend to extend into the canal itself.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 60


There are various ways in which pemmican may be prepared, depending primarily on what one adds into the mixture, in the way of herbs, seasonings and fruit.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 46


"Mistress is up," she said. She then set the tray down on the small table. She arranged the articles on the tray, and then brought a cushion from the side of the room and placed it by the table. There was, on the tray, a plate of fruit, some yellow, wedge-shaped bread, and a bowl of hot, rich-looking, dark-brown, almost-black fluid.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 42


"Exceptions can occur under certain circumstances, of course," said the girl. "Mistress might, for example, in the presence of a man she wishes to arouse, take a larger than normal bite from a fresh fruit, and look at the man over the fruit, letting juice, a tiny trickle of it, run at the side of her mouth."
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 61


I took a slice of hard larma from my tray. This is a firm, single-seeded, applelike fruit. It is quite unlike the segmented, juicy larma. It is sometimes called, and perhaps more aptly, the pit fruit, because of its large single stone.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 267


"Hurtha," said I, "what have you there?"
"Fruits, dried and fresh, candies, nuts, four sorts of meats, choice, all of them, fresh-baked bread, selected pastries," responded he, his arms full, "and some superb paga and delicate ka-la-na."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 80


I did not care for the gruel much, as it was tasteless and flat. I ate it, however, as it was incumbent upon me to do so. Too, I was hungry, and it was undeniably nourishing. It, like other aspects of our diet, the fruits and vegetables, and the cylindrical pellets we were given, seemed intended to slim our bodies and bring us to a peak state of health.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 66


"Our food, loaves of bread, and fruit, is thrown down to us, at night," said Tupita. "Water, too, in the darkness, is lowered in the bucket. It is then withdrawn."
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 374


The larma is luscious. It has a rather hard shell but the shell is brittle and easily broken. Within, the fleshy endocarp, the fruit, is delicious, and very juicy.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 437


Tarn Court is a wide street, or, at least, wide for a city street on Gor. Several blocks east of Aulus, before noon, it is the location of a vegetable and fruit market.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 387


Many on this world, you see, cannot read. Thus the importance of the heralds, the criers, and such. Many things are advertised, too, in such a way, by calling out bargains, the fruits in season, the markets, the cost of cloth, and such.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 37


Of the two to one side, the yellowish vessels, one was a flattish bowl, which contained a crust and some meal; too, within it I was pleased to see what I thought were some slices of dried fruit; such things are often included in our diet; they are precious to us;
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 105


I fed, too, similarly, on the meal, and the crust. The slices of dried fruit I would save for later.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 126


When I was sure it was gone I went again to my belly, and to the food bowl. I put my head down and, delicately, bit off part of one of the pieces of dried fruit. I then ate it, treasuring it, even that small part, bit by bit, little by little, particle by particle. Then for a long time I fed there, bit by bit finishing the first of the three pieces, and then the second, similarly, and then the third. Such things, the slices of fruit, are very precious. I had saved them for last. When I was finished, I rise, to all fours.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Pages 128 - 129


I picked up the food and water bowls, each replenished, the one, to my pleasure, even to three tiny pieces of dried fruit, called a larma, and put them in their place, to the left, at the back of the cell.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 135


In this part of the terrace, more toward the wall, and shade, it was crowded. Some booths were set up on the terrace, for the sale of fruit and flowers.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 349


Before the divan, but a bit to the right, as I faced it, was a low table, on which there were beverages and fruits, and tiny bowls and plates, filled with an assortment of viands. I felt momentarily giddy with the smell of the roasted meats, the breads and pastry.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 376


"You have two pieces of fruit," said the free woman. "Give me one!"
"No," said the broad-bodied girl.
"No?" said the free woman, stunned.
"No," said the broad-bodied girl, taking a goodly bite from one of the apricots.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 435



I placed the pitted fruit on the stones before her. She looked down at it. "Take it," I said. "It has been pitted. You need not fear the disposal of the seed.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 451


"We saved a piece of fruit for you," said the Lady Constanzia. "I put it in my tunic. I will give it to you below."
"Thank you," I said.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 500


There were, of course, the pans, pots, utensils, lamps, pails, and such, which, on shelves and dangling from poles, she supposed might have suggested the name of the market, but there were also stalls, as well, specializing in many other forms of goods, for example, stalls of fruits and vegetables, and produce of various sorts, and sausages and dried meats, and stalls of tunics, cloaks, robes, veils, scarves, and simple cloth, and of leatherwork, belts and wallets, and such, and of footwear, oils, instruments of the bath, cosmetics and perfumes, and mats and coarse rugs, and such.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 230


Fel Doron passed her again, this time carrying supplies from the kitchen, bread, biscuits, dried fruit, a bulging sack of meal, which supplies he placed in a nearby tarn basket.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 335


One, too, dug him tubers, wild suls, and the other brought him tree fruit, kernelled pods which dangle from the Bar tree, native, as we understand it, neither to Earth or Gor.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 183


While in the habitat village he also purchased supplies of various sorts, among them some biscuits and dried fruit, some vessels, some robes, three blankets, an ax, and two knives.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 370 - 371


The corsairs of Port Kar venturing at sea, prowling the merchant routes, unannouncedly visiting coastal towns, and such, often returned to port well freighted with various assortments of goods, fruits and grains, weapons, vessels, tools, leathers, viands and wines, precious metals and stones, diverse jewelries, unguents, perfumes, silks, women, and such.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 35


Crates of larmas were brought on board, these to add important elements to a diet which, otherwise, in a long voyage, might lead to diseases of deficiency. The larma does not grow naturally in Torvaldsland, but certain hard fruits do, which, happily, will serve a similar purpose.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 534 - 535


The taverner turned to his man. "Bring bread, and meat, suls, and tur-pah, and fruit, for our guest."
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 5


Indeed, given improvements in slave wine, dating back some years, brewed from the sip root, the first administering of the wine would be sufficient indefinitely, until the administration of a releaser, which removes its effects. The releaser, I am told, unlike slave wine, which is quite bitter, is quite pleasant, rather like a sweet wine, or fruit liqueur.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 524


In any event, venders of comestibles, biscuits, candy, fruit, and such, with their carts and trays, have been about, and doing their business, too.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 542


Then, at a sharp clapping of Mrs. Rawlinson's hands, we leapt up and hurried to the kitchen, to bring forth the fare, the sweets, the candies, the nuts, the bowls of fruit, the herbs, the bread, flat, circular loaves of bread, which would be divided into eight wedges, the many covered dishes of boiled vegetables and hot meat, the vessels of wine, and such, and placed these on the serving table from which place we began to serve the guests.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 32 - 33


Fruits and sauces in hand I was ascending the stairs to the domicile.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 632


"Now, Jane and Eve," said the Lady Bina "let us be up and about, and serve. Fetch fruit and salads. Warm the main dishes. Bring more ka-la-na."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 640


Gorean children would be more adept at such estimations than I. They are taught to estimate the time of day by the position of Tor-tu-Gor, Light-Upon-the-Home-Stone, rather as they are taught to recognize fruits and blossoms, trees and flowers, and a thousand small things within their environment, things which children of my world seldom notice, and in which they are seldom interested.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 241


I knew enough of the forest within the wands to recognize many things outside them which might be eaten; leafy Tur-Pah, parasitic on Tur trees, of course, but, too, certain plants whose roots were edible, as the wild Sul; and there were flat ground pods in tangles which I could tear open, iron fruit whose shells might be broken between rocks, and autumn gim berries, purple and juicy, perhaps named for the bird, whose cast fruit lies under the snow, the seeds surviving until spring, when one in a thousand might germinate.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 243


It was time, at Shipcamp that the slaves of Kennel Five would be given their warm slave gruel, before they would be returned to their chains in the low, heavy enclosure. Usually we were permitted to feed ourselves, but sometimes we must eat on all fours, head down, not using our hands. This is useful in reminding a girl that she is a slave. Often enough we are given bread and fruit.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 251


I had never tasted ka-la-na but I had gathered there were a great many varieties, differing much in quality. Some Ubars might barter a city or a hundred slaves for a given flask of the beverage. Others were so cheap and common that, as the joke goes, they might be mixed with the swill of tarsk. The word itself, which is generic for several wines, derives from the ka-la-na trees, or wine trees, of Gor. But wines, as is well known, may be derived not only from the clustered fruits weighting the branches of the ka-la-na tree in the autumn, but, as on my former world, from vine fruit, tree fruit, bush fruit, even from some types of leaves.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 295


They removed the silken covers and we noted the hampers were heaped with fruits, vegetables, cakes of rice, smoked fish, layers of dried, salted meat, and stoppered vessels which I supposed might contain sake, and perhaps, considering the continental mercenaries in the camp, none of whom had been permitted, save myself, to attend these proceedings, paga and ka-la-na.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 55


Here there were unusual stones, brought in from the coast, shaped by centuries of tides; and all about were varieties of trees, large and small, some fruit-bearing, some ablaze with blossoms.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 159


"We will need a wagon or cart " I said.
"There are many near the point," said Pertinax. "Near the market where vegetables and fruits are sold."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Pages 411 - 412


Two days ago I had stolen a tospit from the fruit bin,
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 155


There were only the two soups, four vegetables, and two meats, roast Vosk gull and seasoned, boiled verr followed by fruit and nuts.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 160


Certain streets in Ar, in certain districts, are similarly sheltered from the sun, though with vines clinging to the latticework, and then, usually, here and there are stands of fruits and vegetables lining the walls.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 525


Then the Kur, angrily, suddenly, overturned one of the tables, spilling wine, cakes, and fruit, but it made no effort to more closely approach the guests, who had shrunk back even further.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 533





 


Fudge
To The Top


He yelled something raucous and ribald. It had to do with "tastas" or "stick candies." These are not candies, incidentally, like sticks, as, for example, licorice or peppermint sticks, but soft, rounded, succulent candies, usually covered with a coating of syrup or fudge, rather in the nature of the caramel apple, but much smaller, and, like a caramel apple, mounted on sticks. The candy is prepared and then the stick, from the bottom, is thrust up, deeply, into it. It is then ready to be eaten. As the candy is held neatly in place there is very little mess in this arrangement. Similarly, as the candy is held in its fixed position, it may, in spite of its nature, be eaten, or bitten, or licked or sucked, as swiftly, or slowly, and as much at one's leisure as one might please. These candies are usually sold at such places as parks, beaches, and promenades, at carnivals, expositions and fairs, and at various types of popular events, such as plays, song dramas, races, games, and kaissa matches. They are popular even with children.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 81





 


Gant
To The Top


I heard a bird some forty or fifty yards to my right; it sounded like a marsh gant, a small, horned, web-footed aquatic fowl, broad-billed and broad-winged. Marsh girls, the daughters of rence growers, sometimes hunt them with throwing sticks.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 4


I had also been used to carry heavy kettles of rence beer from the various islands to the place of feasting, as well as strings of water gourds, poles of fish, plucked gants, slaughtered tarsks, and baskets of the pith of rence.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 41


I had carried about bowls of cut, fried fish, and wooden trays of roasted tarsk meat, and roasted gants, threaded on sticks, and rence cakes and porridges, and gourd flagons, many times replenished, of rence beer.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 44


"I have brought down two small gants," I said, "with stones."
. . .
"I think we can have a small fire for the gants," I said. "I think we can set it in here, on a plate. There will be little smoke, and what there is will be randomly distributed, escaping various windows. I do not think it will be detectable."
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Pages 258 - 259


It had been a long time since I had had any cooked food, not since the gants on the abandoned slave barge, weeks ago, with Ina.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 372





 


Gant Eggs
To The Top


Wild marsh gants, captured, even as young as gantlings, cannot be domesticated, on the other hand, eggs, at the hatching point, gathered from floating gant nests, are sometimes brought to the island;
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Pages 16 - 17


I stepped aside to let a young girl pass, who carried two baskets of eggs, those of the migratory arctic gant. They nest in the mountains of the Hrimgar and in steep, rocky outcroppings, called bird cliffs, found here and there jutting out of the tundra. The bird cliffs doubtless bear some geological relation to the Hrimgar chains. When such eggs are frozen they are eaten like apples.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 196





 


Garbage
To The Top


I found my way to Port Kar, where I lived unpleasantly for some time on garbage floating in the canals and such other tidbits as I could find about."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 196


Again he came under the table, and this time his hand darted out and back, and he began to chew on his prize, a peel of larma fruit snatched from a plate, discarded as garbage.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 321


Tersites had, some five years before, been removed from the arsenal. He had taken his ideas to Cos and Tyros, but there, too, he had met with only scorn. He had then returned to Port Kar, his fortunes exhausted, no place left to him in the arsenal. He now lived, it was said, on the garbage in the canals.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 137


I stopped on the walkway. Ahead, some yards, was a girl dark-haired, lying on her belly on the walkway, reaching with her hand down to the canal, to fish out edible garbage. She was barefoot, and wore a brief, brown rag. I did not think she was a slave. Some free girls, runaways, vagabonds, girls of no family or position, live about port cities, scavenging as they can, begging, stealing, sleeping at night in crates and under bridges and piers. They are called the she-urts of the wharves.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 47


It was a bit past dawn and the paga taverns backing on the smaller canal would be throwing out their garbage from the preceding night. She-urts sometimes gather at such places for their pick of the remnants of feasts.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 61


Suddenly her wrist was seized by the girl, a tall, lovely girl, some four inches taller than she, in a brief white rag, who stood with her at the basket. "Who are you?" demanded the girl in the white rag. You are not one with us." She took the pear from her, with the verr cheese in it. "You have not laid with the paga attendants for your garbage," she said. "Get out!" Any woman, even a free woman, if she is hungry enough, will do anything. The paga attendants knew this. "Get out!" said the girl in the white rag.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 62


There is a shallow trough for water, cut in the stone, near one wall, where we would be chained when not working. This is filled twice daily. Too, at the wall, we would be thrown crusts of bread, and scraps of meat and fruit, usually the garbage of the feasts of pirates, our captors.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 291


We stepped back and he, from a basket, hurled an assortment of scraps, such as crusts of bread and rinds of fruit, into the muddy pit. It was the refuse, the garbage, I gathered, from a meal of the slaver's men.
In the pit the girls regarded the refuse with horror. Then I saw the small, chained hand of one reach forth toward a piece of roll. She picked it up and thrust it in her mouth. Another girl then reached to a bit of fruit. Another then snatched at a gravy-sopped wedge of yellow Sa-Tarna bread.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 98


I saw some girls rummaging through a garbage can. They wore short tunics but they were not slaves. Goreans sometimes refer to such women as "strays." They are civic nuisances. They are occasionally rounded up, guardsmen appearing at opposite ends of an alley, trapping them, and collared.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 139


"Oh, I have begged at the wagons," she said suddenly, sobbing. "It is not a new thing for me! I have begged! I have been on my knees for a crust of bread. I have fought with other women for garbage beside the road."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 17


"I hid by day," she said. "I stole food, from garbage, at night.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 283


"You followed me from the gambling house," I said.
"You lost heavily," he said. "Perhaps tonight you will feed from the garbage troughs."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 44





 


Garlic
To The Top


"I have peas and turnips, garlic and onions in my hut," said the man, his bundle like a giant's hump on his back.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 29


I could smell his breath, heavy with drink, and garlic, and herbs, across the furs.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 312





 


Gim Berries
To The Top


I knew enough of the forest within the wands to recognize many things outside them which might be eaten; leafy Tur-Pah, parasitic on Tur trees, of course, but, too, certain plants whose roots were edible, as the wild Sul; and there were flat ground pods in tangles which I could tear open, iron fruit whose shells might be broken between rocks, and autumn gim berries, purple and juicy, perhaps named for the bird, whose cast fruit lies under the snow, the seeds surviving until spring, when one in a thousand might germinate.
. . .
The berries are tasty. They do mark the tongue and, if one is not careful, the mouth.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 243


Then, given cloths, to be fashioned into sacks, we were sent into the woods to gather gim berries, under the supervision of short-haired Hiza.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 292


Other than Tur-Pah, I could recognize the leafage which betokened Suls, usually found in the open, in drier, sandier soils, and was familiar with a number of edible nuts and berries, such as ram berries and gim berries, the latter common at this time of year.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 442





 


Grain
To The Top


Economically, the base of the Gorean life was the free peasant, which was perhaps the lowest but undoubtedly the most fundamental caste, and the staple crop was a yellow grain called Sa-Tarna, or Life-Daughter. Interestingly enough, the word for meat is Sa-Tassna, which means Life-Mother. Incidentally, when one speaks of food in general, one always speaks of Sa-Tassna. The expression for the yellow grain seems to be a secondary expression, derivative. This would seem to indicate that a hunting economy underlay or was prior to the agricultural economy.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Pages 43 - 44


The Older Tarl and I may have drunk too much of that fermented brew concocted with fiendish skill from the yellow grain, Sa-Tarna, and called Pagar-Sa-Tarna, Pleasure of the Life-Daughter, but almost always "Paga" for short. I doubted that I would ever touch the stuff again.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Pages 60 - 61


Lastly, as the culmination of Ar's Planting Feast, and of the greatest importance to the plan of the Council of Ko-ro-ba, a member of the Ubar's family goes to the roof at night, under the three full moons with which the feast is correlated, and casts grain upon the stone and drops of a red winelike drink made from the fruit of the Ka-la-na tree. The member of the Ubar's family then prays to the Priest-Kings for an abundant harvest and returns to the interior of the cylinder, at which point the Guards of the Home Stone resume their vigil.
This year the honor of the grain sacrifice was to be accorded to the daughter of the Ubar.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 68


The night before, I had ridden over fields of grain, silvery yellow beneath me in the light of the three moons.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 73


I lunged for the center of the platform, breaking under my foot a small ceremonial basket filled with grain, kicking from my path a Ka-la-na container, splashing the fermented red liquid across the stone surface.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 79


Now she, like all other members of the household of Marlenus, slave or free, would be subjected to the vengeance of the outraged citizens, citizens who had marched in the processions of the Ubar in the days of his glory, carrying flasks of Ka-la-na wine and sheaves of Sa-Tarna grain, singing his praises in the melodious litanies of Gor.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 102


Within the City the Initiates, who had seized control shortly after the flight of Marlenus, would have already tapped the siege reservoirs and begun to ration the stores of the huge grain cylinders. A city such as Ar, properly commanded, might withstand a siege for a generation.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 163


Far to my left I saw a splendid field of Sa-Tarna, bending beautifully in the wind, that tall yellow grain that forms a staple in the Gorean diet.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Pages 19 - 20


I decided, if worse came to worst, that I could always go to a simple Paga Tavern where, if those of Tharna resembled those of Ko-ro-ba and Ar, one might, curled in a rug behind the low tables, unobtrusively spend the night for the price of a pot of Paga, a strong, fermented drink brewed from the yellow grains of Gor's staple crop, Sa-Tarna, or Life-Daughter.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 74


Many are the objects for sale at the fair. I passed among wines and textiles and raw wool, silks, and brocades, copperware and glazed pottery, carpets and tapestries, lumber, furs, hides, salt, arms and arrows, saddles and harness, rings and bracelets and necklaces, belts and sandals, lamps and oils, medicines and meats and grains,
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 12


The only two cities, other than Ar, which I knew that Treve did not periodically attack were mountainous Thentis, famed for its tarn flocks, and Ko-ro-ba, my own city.

If the issue was grain, of course, there would be little point in going to Thentis, for she imports her own, but her primary wealth, her tarn flocks, is not negligible, and she also possesses silver, though her mines are not as rich as those of Tharna. Perhaps Treve has never attacked Thentis because she, too, is a mountain city, lying in the Mountains of Thentis, or more likely because the men of Treve respect her tarnsmen almost as much as they do their own.

The cessation of attacks on Ko-ro-ba began during the time my father, Matthew Cabot, was Ubar of that city.

He organized a system of far-flung beacons, set in fortified towers, which would give the alarm when unwelcome forces entered the territory of Ko-ro-ba. At the sight of raiders one tower would set its beacon aflame, glittering by night, or dampen it with green branches by day to produce a white smoke, and this signal would be relayed from tower to tower. Thus when the tarnsmen of Treve came to the grain fields of Ko-ro-ba, which lie for the most part some pasangs from the city, toward the Vosk and Tamber Gulf, they would find her tarnsmen arrayed against them. Having come for grain and not war, the men of Treve would then turn back, and seek out the fields of a less well-defended city.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 62


Each of the four haruspexes then, after intoning an involved entreaty of some sort to the sky, which at the time was shining beneficently, suddenly cast a handful of something - doubtless grain - to the pigeons in the stick cage.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 172


Downstairs the wooden screens that had separated the shop from the street had been splintered apart; the counter had been broken and the ovens ruined, their oval domes shattered, their iron doors twisted from their hinges; even the top stones on the two grain mills had been thrown to the floor and broken.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 237


Ho-Tu, I noted, but did not speak to him of it, drank only water and, with a horn spoon, ate only a grain porridge mixed with bosk milk.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 87


She would be hungry tonight and in the morning would have to go to the feed troughs in the quarters of the female staff slaves, probably for water and a porridge of grain and vegetables.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 89


Politically, Port Kar is a chaos, ruled by several conflicting Ubars, each with his own following, each attempting to terrorize, to govern and tax to the extent of his power. Nominally beneath these Ubars, but in fact much independent of them, is an oligarchy of merchant princes, Captains, as they call themselves, who, hold council, maintain and manage the great arsenal, building and renting ships and fittings, themselves controlling the grain fleet, the oil fleet, the slave fleet, and others.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 104


We then turned our attention to matters of greater importance, the need for more covered docks in the arsenal, beneath which additional galleys could be caulked for the grain fleet, else how could a hundred vessels be ready for the voyage north to the grain fields before the sixth passage hand?
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 133


Other studies, the results of which would be kept similarly private to the council, dealt with the city defenses, and her stores of wood, grain, salt, stone and tharlarion oil.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 159


The other news dealt with the bold raids of Rask of Treve. All Ko-ro-ba seemed aflame with fury.
Four caravans had fallen spoils to the fierce, swiftly striking tarnsman of Treve. And his men had fired dozens of fields, destroying Sa-Tarna grains. The smoke of two of these fields had been visible even from the high bridges of Ko-ro-ba herself.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 189 - 190


"I have here," called Svein Blue Tooth, "a bucket of Sa-Tarna grain. This, in token of hospitality, I offer to our guest."

The Kur looked into the bucket, at the yellow grain. I saw the claws on the right paw briefly expose themselves, then, swiftly, draw within the softness of the furred, multiple digited appendage.

"I thank the great Jarl," said the beast, "and fine grain it is. It will be our hope to have such good fortune with our own crops in the south. But I must decline to taste your gift for we, like men, and unlike bosk, do not feed on raw grain."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 178


"Will you swear, too," he asked, "by the grains of your fields, the boundary stones of your holdings, the locks on your chests and the salt on your table?"
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 184


Thyri herself, her kirtle thrown to her, was ordered to pound grain to make flour; she could not even look Tarsk in the face,
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 193


Meat, hides, and animal-hair cloth are furnished to the oases by the nomads. In turn, from the oases the nomads receive, most importantly, Sa-Tarna grain and the Bazi tea.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


I passed a fellow inlaying wood, and the shop of a silversmith, and stalls filled with baskets, some of which, grain baskets, were large enough to hold a man.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 50


Alyena threw herself to the floor before him, moving to the music. I supposed she saw in him her "rich man," who would guarantee her a life in which she might be protected from the labors of the free woman of the Tahari, the pounding of grain with the heavy pestle, the weaving of cloth, the churning of milk in skin bags, the carrying of water, the herding of animals with sticks in the blistering heat.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 101 - 102


She cried out. The heavy, round-ended pestle, some five feet in height, more than five inches wide at the base, dropped. It weighed some thirty pounds. When it dropped, the heavy wooden bowl, more than a foot deep and eighteen inches in diameter, tipped, Sa-Tarna grain spilled to the ground. I held her by the arms, from behind.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 136 - 137


There were flasks of wine there, and bottles of the brew called paga; stores of salt, grains, dried meats and vegetables;
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 50


Two peasants walked by, in their rough tunics, knee-length, of the white wool of the Hurt. They carried staves and grain sacks.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 47


The girl's height, ankles, wrists, throat, hips, waist and bust had been measured. She had even been thrown on a grain scale and weighed.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 66


The paga tasted a bit strange, but it was a local paga and there is variation in such pagas, generally a function of the brewer's choice of herbs and grains.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 132


The fifth fellow was an oarsman on a grain galley.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 58


I stepped aside as a string of eight peasants, with bundles of Sa-Tarna grain on their shoulders, made their way down toward the wharves.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Pages 68 - 69


"Bread, Master?" asked a blond-haired beauty, kneeling down beside me. She offered me a silver tray on which, hot and steaming, were wedges of Gorean bread, made from Sa-Tarna grain.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 191


Who can begin to quantify, or measure, the attractiveness of the female slave? Does she not seem to be the object designed by nature to be at the feet of men? Wars are fought to obtain them. Tributes, in part, are levied in terms of them, along with gold and Sa-Tarna grain.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 105


There were some five wagons approaching the city, in a line. Each was being drawn by two strings of harnessed male slaves, about twenty slaves in each string.
"Those are Sa-Tarna wagons," said Drusus, "bringing grain to the city."
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 104


Five days ago I had been returning to the camp of Boots Tarsk-Bit, coming back from a nearby village where I had gone to fetch Sa-Tarna grain, from which the girls, back at the camp, using stones and flat rocks, sifters and pans, would produce flour. This was somewhat cheaper than buying the flour directly, for then one must pay the cost of the peasant women's work or that of its millage. I carried the sack across my shoulders. It was not heavy. It weighed only a little more than an average female.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 258


Feiqa clenched her small fists beside her head. I could see she did not care to hear this sort of thing. In Samnium she had been a rich woman, of a family well known on its Street of Coins. Doubtless many times she would have held herself a thousand times superior to the poor peasant women, coming in from the villages, in their bleached woolen robes, bringing their sacks and baskets of grain and produce to the city's markets.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 19 - 20


On the summit of a small hill I saw some seven or eight riders, riders of the high tharlarion, the tharlarion shifting and clawing about under them, with tharlarion lances. They were clad in dusty, soiled leather, riding leather, to protect their legs from the scaly hides of the beasts, and helmeted. Two had shields slung at their back. Shields of the others hung at the left sides of their saddles. They seemed an unkempt, dirty, grim lot. About the beasts' necks, and behind the saddles, hung panniers of grain and sacks of woven netting containing dried larmas and brown suls.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 36


"Be silent," I said. What was she complaining about? I had even carried her to this place in honor, in my arms, as a free woman. I had not thrown her over my shoulder, her ass to the front, her head scornfully to the rear, as properties are commonly carried, such as sacks of grain and female slaves.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 409


I thought the storm might have abated a bit but the rain was still heavy. Too, from time to time, lightning shattered across the sky, suddenly bathing the road and countryside in flashes of wild, white light, this coupled almost momentarily, sometimes a little sooner, sometimes a little later, with a grinding and explosion of thunder.

"It seems the Priest-Kings are grinding flour," laughed a man near me.

"It would seem so," I said.

This was a reference to an old form of grinding, for some reason still attributed to Priest-Kings, in which a pestle, striking down, is used with a mortar. Most Sa-Tarna is now ground in mills, between stones, the top stone usually turned by water power, but sometimes by a tharlarion, or slaves. In some villages, however, something approximating the old mortar and pestle is sometimes used, the two blocks, a pounding block strung to a springy, bent pole, and the mortar block, or anvil block. The pole has one or more ropes attached to it, near its end. When these are drawn downward the pounding block descends into the mortar block, and the springiness of the pole, of course, straightening, then raises it for another blow. More commonly, however, querns are used, usually, if they are large, operated by two men, if smaller, by two boys. Hand querns, which may be turned by a woman, are also not unknown.

The principle of the common quern is as follows: it consists primarily of a mount, two stones, an overhead beam and a pole. The two stones are circular grinding stones. The bottom stone has a small hub on its upper surface which fits into an inverted concave depression in the upper stone. This helps to keep the stones together. It also has shallow, radiating surface grooves through which the grindings may escape between the stones, to be caught in the sturdy boxlike mount supporting the stones, often then funneled to a waiting receptacle or sack. The upper stone has two holes in it, in the center a funnel-shaped hole through which grain is poured, and, near the edge, another hole into which one end of the turning pole is placed. This pole is normally managed by two operators. Its upper portion is fitted into an aperture in the overhead beam, which supplies leverage and, of course, by affording a steadying rest, makes the pole easier to handle. The principle of the hand quern is similar, but it is usually turned with a small wooden handle. The meal or flour emerging from these devices is usually sifted, as it must often be reground, sometimes several times. The sifter usually is made of hide stretched over a wooden hoop. The holes are punched in the hide with a hot wire.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Pages 17 - 18


"Yes, Master!" she said, stumbling, hurrying, running to the wagon, to fetch supplies, pans, utensils, bread, grains, that she might expeditiously set about preparing the men's breakfast.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 669


And consider that free man who calculates so carefully the advantages of a companionship, who so carefully measures out the prospects of a relationship, as a merchant might weigh grain upon a scale.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Pages 704 - 705


There are rice fields on Gor, in the vicinity of Bazi, famed for its teas, but rice is not as familiar on Gor as the grain, sa-tarna.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 409


A small sack of grain, commonly Sa-Tarna, the Life Daughter, is often carried in the pack, or at one's belt. Two handfuls of this, the hands cupped together, may then be dampened in a spring, or stream, and eaten.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 111 - 112


Some such sheds are also used for the housing of rice seedlings, which are later transferred to designated paddies, or wading fields. Harvested grains are commonly dried in the sun in Se'Kara, before the Seventh Passage Hand.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 181


We were apparently camisked because the gate of the mill yard was usually open in daylight hours, and free women might pass by. Too, sometimes peasant woman, accompanying their companions, brought grain to the mill.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 141


I saw the miller's man approaching, with his basket of grain, followed by the dark-haired flute girl. He set his ladder against the stone, climbed the ladder, and poured the grain into the cavity within the stone. He then withdrew, setting the ladder aside, and disappeared, with his basket, returning to the receiving house, where grain was brought and weighed, and records kept.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 142


Once, when I was laboring in a field, sickle in hand, with others, harvesting sa-tarna, a great shadow, as of a cloud, raced across the golden grain.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 152


I ladled the grain and vulo soup, seasoned with brown, ground tur-pah, carefully into the bowl.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 157


Odors, too, emanated from the crackling pans, plates, and griddles of the cook shops. Soup, usually thick, sometimes with suls, as in sullage, but commonly comprised of other vegetables and noodles, would be ladled into wooden bowls. And there would be, too, behind the counter, in baskets, grapes, tospits, larmas, nuts, and olives, and, in blocks, cheeses, and, in its amphorae to be lifted from its racks, cheap ka-la-na.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 251






 


Grapes
To The Top


The fruit grapes and peaches of some sort was fresh and as cold as mountain snow.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 26


The meal was completed by a handful of grapes and a draught of water from the wall tap. The grapes were purple and, I suppose, Ta grapes from the lower vineyards of the terraced island of Cos some four hundred pasangs from Port Kar. I had tasted some only once before, having been introduced to them at a feast given in my honor by Lara, who was Tatrix of the city of Tharna. If they were indeed Ta grapes I supposed they must have come by galley from Cos to Port Kar, and from Port Kar to the Fair of En'Kara. Port Kar and Cos are hereditary enemies, but such traditions would not be likely to preclude some profitable smuggling. But perhaps they were not Ta grapes for Cos was far distant, and even if carried by tarns, the grapes would probably not seem so fresh.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 45


I was astonished, for this girl was dressed not as a Gorean, not as a girl of any of the cities of the Counter-Earth, not as a peasant of the Sa-Tarna fields or the vineyards where the Ta grapes are raised, not even as a girl of the fierce Wagon Peoples.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 35


Cos had many terraces, on which the Ta grapes are grown.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 139


"Fetch Ta grapes from the kitchen," I told her.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 224


There was a flash of slave bells at my side and a dark-haired, yellow-silked girl, a paga girl, knelt beside us, where we sat cross-legged behind the small table. "Paga, Masters?"

"For three," said I, expansively. "And bring bread and bosk, and grapes."
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 46


One girl held back our head, and others, from goblets, gave us of wines, Turian wine, sweet and thick, Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes, from the terraces of Cos, wines even, Ka-la-nas, sweets and drys, from distant Ar.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 213


He was balding, and wore upon his head a crown of grape leaves, from the famed grapes of the terraces of Cos.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 335


Tables were strewn about and sheets thrown upon the ground. Free tarsk and roast bosk were being served, and Sa-Tarna bread and Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes of the Cosian terraces.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 98


"Thank you, Master," I said, and drank some swallows of the beverage. It was a Ta wine, from the Ta grapes of the terraces of Cos.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 306


"We will rest here for a time," I said. "There are grapes here. Feed me."
I lay down on one elbow and watched her picking the grapes with her teeth. Then she came and knelt humbly beside me and, one by one, from her mouth, as I fed, placed the grapes in my mouth.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 375


"Grapes, Master?" said a soft, feminine voice near to me. I looked about, but I did not react. It was the free woman, or the woman who had been free, who had been ordered from the crowd on the wharves of Victoria. I recalled her having been stripped by the pirate, and his blade at her throat. She had tied the knot of bondage in her own hair. She had been ordered to run to the galley. There I had seen her bound helplessly at its railing, her back to it, exposing her beauty, with others. "Master?" she asked. Her voice, and mien, were deferential, and totally submissive. An incredible transformation had come over her. She was now soft, and lovely, and beautiful, a woman who was, and knew herself, owned. I wanted to take her in my arms. She lifted the tray of grapes to me, proffering it. They were Ta grapes. I smiled. Each, I noted, had been carefully peeled. Doubtless that had been the task to which she had set that afternoon. Such trivial, painstaking tasks are often useful in teaching a woman that she is a slave. "Master?" she asked. I wanted to take her in my arms. I permitted her to feed me a grape. Then she withdrew. I watched her withdraw. She was beautiful. She wore a snatch of yellow silk.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 193


"Ubar!" cried Temenides, turning to corpulent Belnar, lounging behind the low table, rolling in his fat, eating grapes.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 321


"Many things now come together," said Scormus. "Even so small a thing as the presence of Ta grapes, generally associated with the terraces of Cos, at the banquet of Belnar now seems significant."
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 392


"These are Ta grapes, I am told," he said, "from the terraces of Cos."
"Yes, they are," I said. "Or at least they are Ta grapes."
"Cos is an island," he said.
"I have heard that," I said. "These various things must have been terribly expensive."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 81


"We have been chained together," he observed, "in this soft, pleasant place. And to the side I see some wine, it seems, some larmas, some grapes, some wedges of soft bread."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 267


"The bread is good," said Cabot, and he seized up a handful of grapes, as well, from the dish on the grass.
. . .
"Serve me," said the blonde to Grendel, and he bent to fetch some wine, some grapes, some bread for her.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 275


I thought of Jad, her opulent streets, of the countryside, of the terraces of Cos, of her grapes, fresh, sweet, and full, of Ar, of glorious, imperial Ar, with its countless towers and its wide boulevards, of the occupation, of my squad, of the rising in the city, the flight to return, the welcome we did not receive, the poverty, the casting about, of Telnus, her taverns, her harbor, and shipping, of the Metioche, and of the great ship of Tersites.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 181





 


Ground Pods
To The Top


I knew enough of the forest within the wands to recognize many things outside them which might be eaten; leafy Tur-Pah, parasitic on Tur trees, of course, but, too, certain plants whose roots were edible, as the wild Sul; and there were flat ground pods in tangles which I could tear open, iron fruit whose shells might be broken between rocks, and autumn gim berries, purple and juicy, perhaps named for the bird, whose cast fruit lies under the snow, the seeds surviving until spring, when one in a thousand might germinate.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 243





 


Grubs
To The Top


Indeed, in moments, most of the beasts of the herd, in their doltish fashion, had returned to their pursuits, as though nothing had happened, scratching for grubs and worms, digging here and there to uncover edible roots.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 513


 


Gruel
To The Top


"When will you begin the training?" I asked.

"When the two new girls chosen for the first set grow weary of the kennels, and of the gruel of the iron pens."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 119


The porridges in the iron pens, however, are as ugly and tasteless a gruel, and deliberately so, as might be imagined. As the girl knelt the guardsman pulled back her head and held her nose while the smith, with thumb and forefinger, forced open her jaws and, spilling it a bit on her chin and body, poured a half cup of gruel into her mouth. The girl tried to hold her breath but when it became necessary for her to breathe she must needs swallow the gruel; twice more the smith did this, and then the girl, defeated, swallowed the gruel as he poured it into her mouth, half choking on it.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 126


The second girl had been watching what had gone on. Ho-Tu, with his foot, kicked her gruel pan toward her, which slid under the bars of the gate. She lifted it to her lips and began to eat, trembling.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 126


Each of us had then been forced to eat a large bowl of heavy slave gruel.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 208


With our fingers and, like cats, with our tongues, we finished the gruel. It was plain. It was not sugared or salted. It was slave gruel.
. . .
I finished the slave gruel. It was not tasty, but I was grateful for even so simple a provender.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 66


We were knelt outside the cook shack. We were given wooden bowls. We were served gruel, mixed with thick chunks of boiled tabuk, by the blond, she who had once been Barbara Benson, now Thimble, and the dark-haired girl, who had once been the rich girl, Audrey Brewster, now the slave girl, Thistle.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 162


The first two days the blond-haired girl could not eat. She had shrunk back in horror from the gruel of meal and fish, fit provender for slaves, thrust in its pan into her cage.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 79


Then a man brought a pan of water and a bowl of moistened slave gruel.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 126


"I have heard," said the other girl, who was a shorter one, "that each of us will have five berries put in our gruel this morning."
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 199


I, mixing the water with the precooked meal, formed a sort of cold porridge or gruel. I then, with my fingers, and putting the bowl even to my lips, fed eagerly upon that thick, bland, moist substance.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 257


"But consider the savings I have effected on feed alone," he said.
"Come now," I said. "Table scraps and slave gruel are not that expensive."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 305 - 306


"Shall I call for a slave tube?" I asked.
"No," she begged. My grip on her was merciless. The slave tube is a device for force-feeding a slave. It is not a pleasant device. A round, cylindrical, truncated cushion, usually of cork or leather, with a circular hole in its center, is forced into the slave's mouth. This prevents her from closing her teeth on the tube. The tube is then introduced through the circular opening in the bite cushion into her mouth and run down to her stomach. There is a funnel at the mouth-end of the tube. It may be used for such purposes as feeding a recalcitrant slave liquids, such as juices and broths. Some tubes come, too, however, with plungers, so that semisolid food, such as slave gruel or hash, or even damp bread and tiny pieces of meat, indeed, about anything the master may please, may be forced into her stomach. The girl is usually on her knees when this is done, with her head held back and her hands tied or braceleted behind her. Afterwards her hands are usually left confined for an Ahn or so in this fashion, so that she cannot rid herself of the nourishment.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 361 - 362


"Eat!" said the man. My face was thrust down, into the trough, half into the moist gruel. His hand was in my hair. I feared for a moment I might suffocate. I pressed my face down into the gruel. I opened my mouth. With my teeth and lips, and tongue, desperately scraping, scooping, pulling, licking, biting, pushing down, moving my head, I tried to get as much into my mouth as I could. My head was then pulled up, and held back, by the hair. I swallowed what I had in my mouth. It was not easy to swallow it. I knelt before a wooden feeding trough, with other girls. The man crouched beside me. My eyes were closed. Gruel was upon my face and in my hair. He then threw my head forward again, over the wooden rim of the trough, and pushed my face down again, deeply, submerging it, to the ears, in the gruel. Again I struggled to get as much as I could into my mouth. Then his hand had left my hair and I lifted my head from the moist substance. I blinked, gruel upon my face, its particles like wet, unmelting snow on my eyelashes.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 64


The fellow who had thrust my face into the gruel was looking in my direction. Quickly I put my face back into the trough, thrusting it into the moist gruel. Feeding time was almost over. I did not care for the gruel much, as it was tasteless and flat. I ate it, however, as it was incumbent upon me to do so. Too, I was hungry, and it was undeniably nourishing. It, like other aspects of our diet, the fruits and vegetables, and the cylindrical pellets we were given, seemed intended to slim our bodies and bring us to a peak state of health. The gruel was appropriate enough for us, I supposed. It was clearly a form of animal feed.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 66


After a large breakfast this morning, we had been fed very lightly, however, only a handful of dry gruel put in our mouths after the closing of the exposition area. To be sure, I supposed it was enough for us.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 119


He had then given me a handful of slave gruel, putting it in my mouth as I knelt before him, my wrists chained behind me.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 147


The next morning I was fed, pellets and gruel, in a pan thrust under the kennel gate and then, later, when I had relieved myself, brought forth for the first of my lessons in dance.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 150


The women in Ar's Station, even the youngest and most beautiful, might now be pale, and drawn and scrawny, but water, and slave gruel, forced down their throats if necessary, could bring back their color, and fatten them for the block.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 160


"Continue to feed," said the woman to me.
I continued to feed. It was slave gruel.
Whereas the food was certainly feed, and true food, though plain fare, the function of this feeding, of course, was primarily symbolic or ceremonial. I was feeding as a certain sort of thing in a certain sort of way, on a certain sort of provender. I was under no delusions as to what I was, or how I fed, or on what I fed.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 181


"Is this that on which you are fed?" she asked.

"It is better," I said. "Often we have only slave pellets and slave gruel."

"I am sorry," she said.

"We are slaves," I said.

I picked up the plate and goblet. I stood up.

"The provender of slaves," I said, "is designed to keep us healthy, trim, and vital, as the masters want us. It would be the same with other animals."
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 326


There was no gruel here, no dried mush, no pellets.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 377


Somewhat later Ellen's lane was fed. A slave girl with a bucket of thickened slave gruel went down the line and those in the lane were permitted, one after the other, to reach into the bucket with their free hand, and were permitted to keep what they could hold in one hand. A second girl, carrying a large, flat, wicker tray, brought wedges of bread, cut from flat, rounded loaves, and gave one to each slave. Ellen had learned in the coffle, days ago, that it was not wise to ask for more.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 464


I then, a bit later, opened my mouth, widely, and a handful of slave gruel, or moist mush, was thrust in my mouth. One swallows it a tiny bit at a time, that one not choke. It is bland, and largely tasteless, but filling, for what one gets of it, and apparently nutritious.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111


It was time, at Shipcamp that the slaves of Kennel Five would be given their warm slave gruel, before they would be returned to their chains in the low, heavy enclosure.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 251


The meat was gone, but there were some berries left. I had had such berries, from time to time, in Kennel Five, mixed with the slave gruel. Slave gruel is not that different from some pottages I had known on my former world. As slave feed, however, it is commonly served plain and bland, served without spices, sugars, salts, or other flavors. It is apparently quite nourishing. I am told that in public eating houses, not brothels or taverns, slaves, when admitted, and not chained to rings outside, may kneel beside their master's bench, and while he eats from the plates, and such, on the table, if it be his will, may be given a bowl of slave gruel, which will be placed either on the bench beside him, or on the floor near his place.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 295


"She might have promise," said the second man, "given slave gruel and the whip."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 35


While you are drinking, these bowls will be filled with slave gruel. Slave gruel is bland but it is hardy and extremely nourishing. It is designed for the health and vitality of stock.
. . .
"If you are pleasing," said the fellow, "we will put a biscuit in the gruel, and perhaps a bit of meat."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 65


He then took me by the hair, and forced my head down, holding it over the bowl of gruel, now little more than cold mush.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 270


"While waiting," she said, "perhaps you would care for a handful of slave pellets or a bowl of slave gruel?"
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 385


"He is detained," said Decius Albus. "He will be here shortly. In the meantime, feast, enjoy yourselves. Here and there you will note, placed on the ground, near or below the tables, bowls of slave gruel, and slaves may join the feast, feeding there, feeding, of course, as slaves."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 526


"And I trust your girl enjoyed her gruel," said Master Albus.

"As you can see, noble Albus," said Kurik, "the bowl has been licked clean."

No one, it will be noted, had asked me about the matter. There are, of course, many variations where slave gruel is concerned, ranging from bland mush to exotic mixtures that might tempt a free woman, were it not for the name. Needless to say, such mixtures were occasionally sold, and for a good price, to free women under different names. I had not, incidentally, thought the gruel of any particular note, but it was good enough, not that I had anything to say about such matters. Certainly I had been hungry, and that is often a great help, that serving to elevate one's assessments. That the bowl was licked clean was to be expected. Slaves are not to waste food.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 534


Occasionally, when the masters stopped at an inn, they resided within, and we were chained in kennels, in the inn yard. Slave biscuits and slave gruel were furnished, as part of our board.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 640


"Girl," said Kurik.
"Master?" she said, not raising her head.
"Did you mix a bit of gravy in my slave's gruel?" he asked.
"Yes, Master," she said.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 649


"I am grateful for my warm, flavored gruel," I said.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 650





 


Grunt
To The Top


Three other men of the Forkbeard attended to fishing, two with a net, sweeping it along the side of the serpent, for parsit fish, and the third, near the stem, with a hook and line, baited with vulo liver, for the white-bellied grunt, a large game fish which haunts the plankton banks to feed on parsit fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 59


Half out of the water, then returning to it, I saw a great speckled grunt, four-gilled. It dove, and swirled away. Another man came to help with the line. I observed the struggle. One often fishes from the ships on Thassa, and the diet of the sailors consists, in part, of the catch. Part of each catch is commonly saved, to serve as bait for the next.
I cried out with fear. One of the men shouted with anger. Rising from under the grunt swiftly was a long-bodied shark, white, nine-gilled. It tore the grunt from the line and bore it away. Other dorsal fins, of smaller sharks, trailed it, waiting. Sharks, and sometimes marine saurians, sometimes trail the ships, to secure discarded garbage and rob the lines of the fishermen.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 359 - 360


I carried two marsh grunts, caught on the other side of the bar. I put the grunts on a rock, to be cleaned and boned. She could attend to this.
. . .
"Prepare the grunts," I told her.
"Yes," she said. For this purpose she would use a small, sharp stone.
. . .
"May we make a fire, captor?" she asked.
"No," I said.
. . .
I continued for a time to feed, in a solitary fashion. Then I picked up a piece of the fish and held it out to her. Swiftly then she leaned forward, parting her pretty lips and teeth. She kept her palms down on her thighs. I pulled back the bit of food and she looked up at me.
"Does Ina beg food of her captor?" I asked.
"Yes," she said. "Ina begs food of her captor."
I then gave her the bit of food, putting it in her mouth. She leaned back and ate the food.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Pages 246 - 249


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Hard Fruit
To The Top


There was the odor of food in the kitchen, and of spilled drink. There were several yards of sausages hung on hooks; canisters of flour, sugars and salts; many smaller containers of spices and condiments. Two large wine jugs in one corner of the room. There were many closed pantries lining the walls, and a number of pumps and tubs on side. Some boxes and baskets of hard fruit were stored there.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 271


I broke off another bit of the hard fruit and handed it to him.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 268


Crates of larmas were brought on board, these to add important elements to a diet which, otherwise, in a long voyage, might lead to diseases of deficiency. The larma does not grow naturally in Torvaldsland, but certain hard fruits do, which, happily, will serve a similar purpose.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 534 - 535





 


Hard Larma
To The Top


I took a slice of hard larma from my tray. This is a firm, single-seeded, applelike fruit. It is quite unlike the segmented, juicy larma. It is sometimes called, and perhaps more aptly, the pit fruit, because of its large single stone.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 267





 


Herbs
To The Top


Drawers in the side of the wagon contained, too, mysteries of goods, such as threads, cloths, scissors, thimbles, buttons and patches, brushes and combs, sugars, herbs, spices, packets of salt, and philters of medicine.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 207 - 208


The paga tasted a bit strange, but it was a local paga and there is variation in such pagas, generally a function of the brewer's choice of herbs and grains.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 132


There are various ways in which pemmican may be prepared, depending primarily on what one adds into the mixture, in the way of herbs, seasonings and fruit.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 46


I could smell his breath, heavy with drink, and garlic, and herbs, across the furs.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 312


The tharlarion, unhitched, but tethered, browsed among the trees, pulling at herbs in the grass, lifting its neck to nibble at wide leaves.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 428


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


Then, at a sharp clapping of Mrs. Rawlinson's hands, we leapt up and hurried to the kitchen, to bring forth the fare, the sweets, the candies, the nuts, the bowls of fruit, the herbs, the bread, flat, circular loaves of bread, which would be divided into eight wedges, the many covered dishes of boiled vegetables and hot meat, the vessels of wine, and such, and placed these on the serving table from which place we began to serve the guests.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 32 - 33


"And you," said Kleomenes, rising to his feet, stumbling a little "the three of you, pretty kajirae, put your hands down on your thighs, put your heads back, far, and open your mouths, widely!"

"Master!" we cried, gratefully.

How fortunate we were, how privileged, how generous the master! Many free persons, doubtless, had never tasted a Turian liqueur, not to speak of that of Falnus.

"Enough, enough," said Kleomenes.

"Thank you, Master!" we breathed.

It was like a sweet burning drop of liquid fire, flavored with flower herbs and, detectably, tospit and larma.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 415


I now understood the extensive preparations, the mysterious recent behavior of Lord Grendel, the excitement of the Lady Bina the ka-la-na purchased, the flavorsome herbs, the bosk and tarsk, the early cooking.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 632


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Honey
To The Top


The proprietor arrived with hot bread, honey, salt and, to my delight, a huge, hot roasted chunk of tarsk.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 79


The only relief in their existence comes once a year, on the birthday of the Tatrix, when they are served a small cake, made with honey and sesame seeds, and a small pot of poor Kal-da.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 150


I had tarsk meat and yellow bread with honey, Gorean peas and a tankard of diluted Ka-la-na, warm water mixed with wine.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 87


"And put bread over the fire," I said, "and honey, and the eggs of vulos, and fried tarsk meat and a Torian larma fruit."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 106


"Why is it?" I asked Ho-Tu, whom I felt I had come to know somewhat better in the day, "that when others have Ka-la-na and meat and bread and honey you eat only this porridge?"
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 120


Ho-Sorl, after several races, gave Phyllis a coin, ordering her to find a vendor and buy him some Sa-Tarna bread smeared with honey.
. . .
Pretending not to be particularly observant, but watching very closely, Ho-Sorl and I observed Phyllis picking her way past two vendors with bread and honey.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 217


Rather he looked about on the ramp until he found the small coin he had given her to buy him bread and honey, which coin she had dropped when the four men had seized her.
. . .
Some minutes later Phyllis came to our seats, bringing Ho-Sorl his bread and honey, and the two copper tarn disks change.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 219


Merchants brought sides of bosk, and thighs of tarsk, and wines and fruits to camp, and cheeses and breads and nuts, and flowers and candies and silks and honeys.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 321


I saw small fruit trees, and hives, where honey bees were raised;
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


"Here, Jarl," said Thyri, again handing me the horn. It was filled with the mead of Torvaldsland, brewed from fermented honey, thick and sweet.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 90


I do not care too much for tospits, as they are quite bitter. Some men like them. They are commonly used, sliced and sweetened with honey, and in syrups, and to flavor, with their juices, a variety of dishes.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 102


I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey;
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 47


His father had, many years ago, fled from an inland village, that of Nyuki, noted for its honey, on the northern shore of lake Ushindi.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 219


In the north generally, mead, a drink made with fermented honey, and water, and often spices and such, tends to be favored over paga.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 16


Hot bread with honey was on the table, on wooden trenchers.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 409


It was a far cry from the provenders I had been taught to prepare in the house, ranging from roasted, seasoned bosk and tarsk and fresh plate breads, with honeys and butters, to frosted pastries and decadent, creamed sauces which, in some cities, were outlawed by sumptuary laws.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111





 


Honey Bread
To The Top


"Squeeze the larmas," said the Lady Bina. "There are biscuits, and honey breads, in the pantry."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 234





 


Honey Cakes
To The Top


from a vendor, the Forkbeard bought his girls honey cake; with their fingers they ate it eagerly, crumbs at the side of their mouths.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 144


"I have brought you some tiny honey cakes," I whispered, "from the food cart of the masters."
. . .
I had brought four of the small honey cakes, and I gave two to each of the slaves.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 342 - 343


"Would you like a honey cake, and a small vessel of ruby ka-la-na?" he asked.
"It will be as Master pleases," I said.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 650


I could still relish the taste of the tiny honey cake, and the sips of ka-la-na I had been allowed.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 651





 


Honey Sauce
To The Top


"Another bit of larma, Master?" asked the slave, kneeling behind me and to my left. I turned and, from where I sat cross-legged behind the low table, removed a small, crisp disk of fried larma, with a browned-honey sauce, from the silver tray.





 


Honeyed Chestnuts
To The Top


"The small chestnuts are excellent," said Lord Yamada. "Dip them in honey."
. . .
"I was not paying attention," I said. "Perhaps I was distracted by the honeyed chestnuts."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 210





 


Honeyed Meat
To The Top


I wanted him to give me a cube of meat, honeyed, from the metal plate which lay near him.
. . .
"Please, Master," I wheedled, "feed Dina." He put a cube of meat, boiled in wine, honeyed, in my mouth, thrusting it between my teeth and cheek with his finger.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 270





 


Honeyed Pastries
To The Top


"I awakened several hours later, toward noon, as though I might be in my own compartments, waiting for my girls to open the draperies and bring me steaming black wine and fresh, honeyed pastries,
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 65





 


Honeyed Tur-Pah
To The Top


One would prefer Tur-Pah, certainly on a cool night, boiled in Sullage, or in some stew or even fried, salted, and honeyed, but, too, it is often, perhaps most often, eaten raw. It is the basic ingredient in most Gorean salads.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 441


My serving dish was shortly empty, and I knew I should withdraw to the kitchen, either to have it layered with more syrupped tospit slices, or supplied with another provender, perhaps rice, white, or brown, or red or purple, from Cos, or a plate of cheeses, from local dairies, served with warmed bread, or prepared after the fashion of Ti, rolled in honeyed tur-pah leaves.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 401





 


Human Flesh
To The Top


The Mamba people ate human flesh.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 393 - 394


Cabot had not been pleased to see the extensive pens in which the cattle were crowded, scarcely able to move about, feeding and watering at side troughs, milling about, grunting, pressing against the bars.
"I am sorry if you were distressed," said Pyrrhus, "but you must understand that your species is a food species. I did spare you the squealing at the slaughter bench."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 174





 


Insects
To The Top


"I have fled from those men for six days," wept the girl, "living on berries and insects, sleeping in ditches, hiding, running."
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 57


But I was less eager to sample the small amphibians she caught in her hands or the fat, green insects she scooped from the inside of logs and from under overturned rocks.
"They can be eaten," she said.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 236


I was surely not tempted to sample the small amphibians or the loathsome, fat green insects Ute had called to my attention. They might have been a source of protein, but rather than touch such things to my lips I would have preferred to starve!
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 247


On the tenth day, instead of the pan of bread, with the water, Ute thrust a different pan under the door. I screamed. Tiny things, with tiny sounds, moved, crawling over and about one another in it. I screamed again, and thrust it back out. It had been filled with the fat, loathsome green insects which, in the Ka-la-na thicket, Ute had told me were edible. Indeed, she had eaten them. "They are nourishing," she had said. I screamed hysterically, pounding at the sides of the slave box. The second day, too, I thrust the pan away, almost vomiting. I saw Ute, through the slit, take one of the insects and bite it in two, eating it. Then she turned away. I resolved to starve myself. The third day, almost vomiting, I ate five of them. They, such insects, and water, were my food for the remainder of my time in the tiny slave box.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 315





 


Iron Fruit
To The Top


I knew enough of the forest within the wands to recognize many things outside them which might be eaten; leafy Tur-Pah, parasitic on Tur trees, of course, but, too, certain plants whose roots were edible, as the wild Sul; and there were flat ground pods in tangles which I could tear open, iron fruit whose shells might be broken between rocks, and autumn gim berries, purple and juicy, perhaps named for the bird, whose cast fruit lies under the snow, the seeds surviving until spring, when one in a thousand might germinate.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 243





 


Jerky
To The Top


"Wakapapi," said Cuwignaka to me. This is the Kaiila word for pemmican. A soft cake of this substance was pressed into my hands. I crumbled it. In the winter, of course, such cakes can be frozen solid. One then breaks them into smaller pieces, warms them in one's hands and mouth, and eats them bit by bit. I lifted the crumbled pemmican to my mouth and ate of it. There are various ways in which pemmican may be prepared, depending primarily on what one adds into the mixture, in the way of herbs, seasonings and fruit. A common way of preparing it is as follows. Strips of kailiauk meat, thinly sliced and dried on poles in the sun, are pounded fine, almost to a powder. Crushed fruit, usually chokecherries, is then added to the meat. The whole, then, is mixed with, and fixed by, kailiauk fat, subsequently, usually, being divided into small, flattish, rounded cakes. The fruit sugars make this, in its way, a quick-energy food, while the meat, of course, supplies valuable, long-lasting stamina protein. This, like the dried meat, or jerky, from which it is made, can be eaten either raw or cooked. It is not uncommon for both to be carried in hunting or on war parties. Children will also carry it in their play. The thin slicing of the meat not only abets its preservation, effected by time, the wind and sun, but makes it impractical for flies to lay their eggs in it. Jerky and pemmican, which is usually eaten cooked in the villages, is generally boiled. In these days a trade pot or kettle is normally used. In the old days it was prepared by stone-boiling. In this technique a hole is used. This hole, dug either within the lodge or outside of it, is lined with hide and filled with water. Fire-heated stones would then be placed in the water, heating it, eventually, to boiling. As the stones cooled, of course, they would be removed from the hide pot and replaced with hot stones, the first stones meanwhile, if needed, being reheated.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 46 - 47


Coins, or letters of credit, might be concealed about a wagon, but it is not easy to conceal quantities of flour, salt, jerky, paga and such,
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Pages 113 - 114





 


Juice
To The Top


Kal-da is a hot drink, almost scalding, made of diluted Ka-la-na wine, mixed with citrus juices and stinging spices.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 76


"Drinks, cool drinks!" called a woman, selling juices by the side of the road, coming up to the cart. There was a small crowd at the crest of the hill. It was a place where carts, and wagons, and travelers often stopped. In such a place there were coins to be made. She paid no attention to the sight below. Doubtless she had seen it a thousand times. Her eyes were on possible customers.

"Would you like a drink?" I asked Boabissia.

"Yes," she said.

I purchased her some larma juice for a tarsk bit.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 257


The slave tube is a device for force-feeding a slave. It is not a pleasant device. A round, cylindrical, truncated cushion, usually of cork or leather, with a circular hole in its center, is forced into the slave's mouth. This prevents her from closing her teeth on the tube. The tube is then introduced through the circular opening in the bite cushion into her mouth and run down to her stomach. There is a funnel at the mouth-end of the tube. It may be used for such purposes as feeding a recalcitrant slave liquids, such as juices and broths. Some tubes come, too, however, with plungers, so that semisolid food, such as slave gruel or hash, or even damp bread and tiny pieces of meat, indeed, about anything the master may please, may be forced into her stomach.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 361 - 362





 


Kaiila Milk
To The Top


kaiila milk, which is used, like verr milk, by the peoples of the Tahari, is reddish, and has a strong, salty taste; it contains much ferrous sulfate;
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 71


Too, she taught her skills useful to a Tahari female, the making of ropes from kaiila hair, the cutting and plaiting of reins, the weaving of cloth and mats, the decoration and beading of leather goods, the use of the mortar and pestle, the use of the gram quern, the preparation and spicing of stews, the cleaning of verr and, primarily when we camped near watering holes in the vicinity of nomads, the milking of verr and kaiila. Too, she was taught the churning of milk in skin bags.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 72 - 73


twice daily I milk the she-kaiila;
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 139


Proteins, meat, kaiila milk, vulo eggs, verr cheese, require much water for their digestion. When water is in short supply, the nomads do not eat at all.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 226





 


Kailiauk
To The Top


"The man cuts meat from the kailiauk."
. . .
"The man returns to his camp," said Kog. "He returns with three kaiila, on one of which he rides. The other two are burdened with meat from the kailiauk. Now there will not be hunger in his camp. He returns, too, with the hide of the kailiauk, rolled before him, and three scalps. He will make a shield."
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 49


"The red savages depend for their very lives on the kailiauk," said Kog. "He is the major source of their food and life. His meat and hide, his bones and sinew, sustain them. From him they derive not only food, but clothing and shelter, tools and weapons."
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 50


We watched him eat and drink. We did not feel that his stomach would be ready yet for the meat of kailiauk. We had some from the Dust Legs. It was in sheets, cut almost as thin as paper, dried in the prairie sun, layered in a flat, leather envelope, a parfleche, originally sealed with a seam of hardened fat. By confessing his need for drink and food before us Cuwignaka had, in his way, honored us. This was the sort of thing that a Kaiila warrior would be likely to do only among those whom he considered his friends and comrades.

"Meat," said Cuwignaka.

Grunt and I exchanged glances but, in the end, we fetched Cuwignaka some of the strips of dried kailiauk meat.

He sat, cross-legged, in the grass, and ate some. "It is enough," he said. He thrust back the remainder to Grunt, who inserted it in the opened parfleche.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 328 - 329


It is difficult to make clear to those who are not intimately acquainted with such things the meaning of the Pte, or Kailiauk, to the red savages. It is regarded by them with reverence and affection. It is a central phenomenon in their life, and much of their life revolves around it. The mere thought of the kailiauk can inspire awe in them, and pleasure and excitement. More to them than meat for the stomach and clothes for the back is the kailiauk to them;
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 8


"Wakapapi," said Cuwignaka to me. This is the Kaiila word for pemmican. A soft cake of this substance was pressed into my hands. I crumbled it. In the winter, of course, such cakes can be frozen solid. One then breaks them into smaller pieces, warms them in one's hands and mouth, and eats them bit by bit. I lifted the crumbled pemmican to my mouth and ate of it. There are various ways in which pemmican may be prepared, depending primarily on what one adds into the mixture, in the way of herbs, seasonings and fruit. A common way of preparing it is as follows. Strips of kailiauk meat, thinly sliced and dried on poles in the sun, are pounded fine, almost to a powder. Crushed fruit, usually chokecherries, is then added to the meat. The whole, then, is mixed with, and fixed by, kailiauk fat, subsequently, usually, being divided into small, flattish, rounded cakes. The fruit sugars make this, in its way, a quick-energy food, while the meat, of course, supplies valuable, long-lasting stamina protein. This, like the dried meat, or jerky, from which it is made, can be eaten either raw or cooked. It is not uncommon for both to be carried in hunting or on war parties. Children will also carry it in their play. The thin slicing of the meat not only abets its preservation, effected by time, the wind and sun, but makes it impractical for flies to lay their eggs in it. Jerky and pemmican, which is usually eaten cooked in the villages, is generally boiled. In these days a trade pot or kettle is normally used. In the old days it was prepared by stone-boiling. In this technique a hole is used. This hole, dug either within the lodge or outside of it, is lined with hide and filled with water. Fire-heated stones would then be placed in the water, heating it, eventually, to boiling. As the stones cooled, of course, they would be removed from the hide pot and replaced with hot stones, the first stones meanwhile, if needed, being reheated.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 46 - 47


All about the camp hides such as these, pegged down, and meat racks, heavy with sheets of kailiauk meat, were in evidence. These are common sights in summer camps. The meat is left two or three days in the sun, this being sufficient for its preservation. It is taken in at night to protect it from the night air.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 71


Indeed, we had had to eat much of the stew from small bowls, filled by Winyela with a kailiauk-bone ladle. Some larger pieces of vegetable and meat, we had, however, in the informal fashion of the Barrens, taken from the pot on our knives.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 148


There I saw Seibar, who had once been Pumpkin, of the Waniyanpi, trading, in sign, with a Dust-Leg warrior. Seibar was offering a netted sack of maize. The Dust Leg was bidding sheaves of dried kailiauk meat.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 473





 


Kailiauk Liver
To The Top


The liver had already been removed from the animal, by the hunters. It is a great delicacy, and is commonly eaten raw.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 57





 


Katch
To The Top


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37






 


Kelp
To The Top


He then addressed the other diners. "Note the kelp, the bamboo shoots, the fish, the lotus roots, and mushrooms."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204





 


Kes
To The Top


First she boiled and simmered a kettle of Sullage, a common Gorean soup consisting of three standard ingredients and, as it is said, whatever else may be found, saving only the rocks of the field. The principal ingredients of Sullage are the golden Sul, the starchy, golden-brown vine-borne fruit of the golden-leaved Sul plant; the curled, red, ovate leaves of the Tur-Pah, a tree parasite, cultivated in host orchards of Tur trees, and the salty, blue secondary roots of the Kes Shrub, a small, deeply rooted plant which grows best in sandy soil.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 44 - 45


Whereas some food had been brought from Ar in the wagon, some bread, and cold, prepared dishes, the latter for the free, more food had been bought from the shops in the caravanserai, some cubed, salted bosk, and some kes, tur-pah, and suls. In one of the two vessels suspended over the fire, Paula had prepared sullage, a sort of sul soup, or, in this case, given the thickness of the mix, a sul stew, and, in the other, had boiled the bosk cubes, heating and softening them. She had first, as is usually done, washed and scrubbed the cubes in fresh water, which is done to reduce the salt content and make the cubes more palatable.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 616





 


Kort
To The Top


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48


I detected the odor of kort rinds, matted, drying, on the stones, where they had been scattered from my supper the evening before.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 115





 


Kur Blood
To The Top


In a other place we saw a framework of poles set on the field. From the crossbar, hung by their ankles, were the bodies five Kurii. Two were being dressed for the spit; two, as yet had been untouched, blood was being drained into a helm from the neck of the fifth.

"Ivar Forkbeard!" cried the man holding the helmet. He lifted the helmet to Ivar. Over the helmet Ivar doubled and held his fist, making the sign of Thor. Then he drank, and handed to me the helmet. I poured a drop from the helm to the reddish, muddied earth. "Ta-Sardar-Gor," said I, "To the Priest-Kings of Gor." I looked into the blood. I saw nothing. Only the blood of a Kur. Then I drank. "May the ferocity of the Kur be in you!" cried the man. Then, taking the helmet back, and throwing his head back, he drained it, blood running at the side of his mouth, trickling to the fur at the collar of his jacket.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Pages 260 - 261





 


Larma
To The Top


He then picked up a juicy, red larma fruit, biting into it with a sound that seemed partly crunching as he went through the shell, partly squishing as he bit into the fleshy, segmented endocarp.
. . .
Harold tossed the emptied, collapsed shell of the larma fruit into a corner of the room and whipped one of the scarves from his belt.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 220


"And put bread over the fire," I said, "and honey, and the eggs of vulos, and fried tarsk meat and a Torian larma fruit."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 106


Again he came under the table, and this time his hand darted out and back, and he began to chew on his prize, a peel of larma fruit snatched from a plate, discarded as garbage.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 321


I looked up. The slave boy, Fish, had emerged from the kitchen, holding over his head on a large silver platter a whole roasted tarsk, steaming and crisped, basted, shining under the torchlight, a larma in its mouth, garnished with suls and Tur-Pah.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 219


Behind the cage I reached in and stole the food she had in the cage, two larma fruit lying, split, on its metal floor. I bit into one and tossed the other to Lana, who, too, ate it.
When we had finished the fruit, Lana and I discarded the skin and seeds.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 222


The food had been good, bread and bosk meat, roasted, and cheese, and larma fruit.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 270


From the garment, to the sand about her ankles, there fell several small Gorean plums, a small larma fruit and two silver tarsks.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 92


The tospits, in the Forkbeard's orchard, which can grow at this latitude, as the larma cannot, were too green to eat.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 102


"There are many things I do not understand," said Samos to me. I reached for a slice of larma fruit, and bit through it.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 7


On Gor, the female slave, desiring her master, yet sometimes fearing to speak to him, frightened that she may be struck, has recourse upon occasion to certain devices, the meaning of which is generally established and culturally well understood.
. . .
Another device, common in Port Kar, is for the girl to kneel before the master and put her head down and lift her arms, offering him fruit, usually a larma, or a yellow Gorean peach, ripe and fresh.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 27 - 28


Larma and tospits are also grown at the oases, in small orchards.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


In the cafes I had feasted well. I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48


The gowned female slave, the circlet on her throat and wrist, reached into the supply wagon, into a sack, to find a larma.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 114


Boldly she reached out into the water and picked up the edible rind of a larma. She looked at me. Then she bit into it, and then, tiny bite by tiny bite, she forced herself to chew and eat it.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 63


"Do you think she will make a good slave?" asked Sasi, standing beside me, eating a larma.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 77


A slave girl passed, a short-legged beauty, clad in a gray rag, chewing on a larma fruit. She spit against the wall as I passed.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 174


Before each guests there were tiny slices of tospit and larma, small pastries, and, in a tiny golden cup, with a small golden spoon, the clustered, black, tiny eggs of the white grunt.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Pages 275 - 276


"Another bit of larma, Master?" asked the slave, kneeling behind me and to my left. I turned and, from where I sat cross-legged behind the low table, removed a small, crisp disk of fried larma, with a browned-honey sauce, from the silver tray.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 231


We then, from the tray, feeding ourselves, taking dates, and slices of larma and pastries, breakfasted and chatted.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 295


He also gave me a slice of dried larma, some raisins and a plum.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 216


"I can see that," she said, biting again into the larma. The juice ran down the side of her mouth.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 234


About the beasts' necks, and behind the saddles, hung panniers of grain and sacks of woven netting containing dried larmas and brown suls.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 36


The larma is luscious. It has a rather hard shell but the shell is brittle and easily broken. Within, the fleshy endocarp, the fruit, is delicious, and very juicy.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 437


I picked up the food and water bowls, each replenished, the one, to my pleasure, even to three tiny pieces of dried fruit, called a larma, and put them in their place, to the left, at the back of the cell.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 135


"We have been chained together," he observed, "in this soft, pleasant place. And to the side I see some wine, it seems, some larmas, some grapes, some wedges of soft bread."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 267


Crates of larmas were brought on board, these to add important elements to a diet which, otherwise, in a long voyage, might lead to diseases of deficiency. The larma does not grow naturally in Torvaldsland, but certain hard fruits do, which, happily, will serve a similar purpose.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 534 - 535


Wedges of Sa-Tarna bread were next distributed, and a half larma to each man, useful in prolonged voyages, a precaution against weakness and bleeding. The bread was placed not at my right hand, but insolently before me, half torn. The larma half was small, dry, and withered; it had been crushed, perhaps yesterday, voiding it of most juice. There was little but rind left. It may have been retrieved from garbage.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 198


For example, exquisite Pani ceramics, intricate carvings, and dyed silks, produced in the castle shops of Lord Temmu might bring silver in Brundisium, and be sold for gold in Ar and Turia, and the silver from Brundisium, in Brundisium, of course, might be exchanged for sinew, arrow points, fletching, larmas, tospits, sa-tarna, and such.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 497


In this way the slave may not see where she is being taken, what lies before her bearer, and, too, she may understand herself as goods, so carried, as much so as a sack of suls, a roll of matting, a crate of larmas, a bundle of tur-pah.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 199


"You will leave in the morning," she said, "at dawn, as though on a common errand. Indeed, I will give you two tarsk-bits and you may later purchase some larmas which we may press for breakfast."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 231


"Four larmas for a tarsk-bit especially in the morning, is quite a good buy," said the Lady Bina.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 234


Then he turned to me. "squeeze the larmas," he said to me.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 235


How fortunate we were, how privileged, how generous the master! Many free persons, doubtless, had never tasted a Turian liqueur, not to speak of that of Falnus.

"Enough, enough," said Kleomenes.

"Thank you, Master!" we breathed.

It was like a sweet burning drop of liquid fire, flavored with flower herbs and, detectably, tospit and larma.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 415


Chloe bit into a larma and the juice ran down her chin.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 465


I had breakfasted well, on larma, vulo eggs, fried sul, roast bosk, sa-tarna, and even black wine, the beans for which, I supposed, derived from the far slopes of the Thentis mountains, and may have been brought west at some risk.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 76


"Openly, to be sure," said another fellow, peeling the rind from a larma.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 229


Too, it is not that unusual for unattended slaves to be back-braceleted. In this way they are much less likely to seize up a tospit or small larma from a vendor's cart.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 366





 


Larma Juice
To The Top


"Would you like a drink?" I asked Boabissia.
"Yes," she said.
I purchased her some larma juice for a tarsk bit.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 257


"You will leave in the morning," she said, "at dawn, as though on a common errand. Indeed, I will give you two tarsk-bits and you may later purchase some larmas which we may press for breakfast."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 231


"Squeeze the larmas," said the Lady Bina. "There are biscuits, and honey breads, in the pantry."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 234





 


Lean Meat
To The Top


In the private pens we were given better food, lean meats and vegetables and fruits, and, if our group had trained acceptably, after the evening meal, before being returned, hooded, to the public pens, we would be given candies or pastries, or, sometimes, a swallow of Ka-la-na wine.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 163





 


Leaves - Leafage
To The Top


"In the trees," said Cabot, "we have a small camp, and there are edible leaves there, some gathered roots, and berries."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 339


"Would you like some tharlarion?" Cabot asked the slave.
She shuddered. "Your slave," she said, "would prefer leafage, or berries."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 341


"Come, Beast," said the Lady Bina to Grendel. "Bring me more berries, and leafage, roots, if well washed! I am hungry."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 343





 


Leech
To The Top


I opened my mouth and he put one of the leeches into it. "Eat," he said.

Later he forced another leech into my mouth and waited until I had eaten it. He then took the remaining leeches and, with a shiver of disgust, with two hands, hurled them out from the bar, into the water.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 102


"Such things often attach themselves to rence stems," I said. "Apparently you bent down, to drink. The front of your collar is wet, and the strap, near the throat. Your hair, too, is damp. Perhaps you brushed against rence in doing this. Too, however, such things can float free in the water."

"Please!" she said, shuddering. "Please!"

"It has not had time to affix itself," I said.

It was about four inches long, rubbery, glistening in the moonlight.

"Please!" she whispered.

I picked it off.

"Do you want it?" I asked.

"No!" she said.

"The marsh leech is edible," I said. "At one time I did not know that."
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 236


"Do you recall the marsh leech?" I had asked her. "Yes," she had said, frightened.

"Do you wish to eat one, or more, of them?" I had asked.

"No!" she had said. "No!"

"Perhaps you will be good?" I said.

"Yes," she said.

"Perhaps you will be very good?" I asked.

"Yes," she said. "I will be very good!"
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 249





 


Lelt
To The Top


"Why did you not eat it?" asked the man near me.

I shrugged. Some salt slaves eat the lelt, raw, taken from the water, or gleaned from their harvesting vessels. The first bite is taken behind the back of the neck.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 256





 


Liana Vine Water
To The Top


Another useful source of water is the liana vine. One makes the first cut high, over one's head, to keep the water from being withdrawn by contraction and surface adhesion up the vine. The second cut, made a foot or so from the ground, gives a vine tube which, drained, yields in the neighborhood of a liter of water.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 310





 


Lice
To The Top


On the divan was the Kur, Pyrrhus. In his arms there was a small, white figure, which was picking and nibbling at his fur.

"She is grooming him," whispered Peisistratus. "When she encounters lice, she must eat them."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 151


"You remember how to groom me?" he asked.

"Surely Master," I said, "from the domicile in the house of Epicrates, before contact was made with the blind Kur."

"That was largely to leave my scent upon you," he said, "which was done that my fellow, who was blind, would know a Kur scent, and follow you, and, of course, not be likely to kill you. Now, of course it will be necessary to give you some training, as an actual Kur pet the biting, the nibbling, the use of your teeth, the swallowing of lice and such."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 472


"Groom well, little kajira," came from the first translator, "and perhaps you will not be eaten."

I thrust my face again into the fur.

I then heard from a second translator, apparently back a little farther than the first. "Enjoy the tiny, furtive, crawling things."

"Crack them between your teeth," came from the first translator.

"Are they not delicious?" came from the second translator.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 474


"Do not confuse him with a High One," she said. "I have bitten lice out of the fur of a dozen such beasts who would not permit him to do so much as polish their claws."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 575


"Long ago," said the Lady Bina, selecting a cube of meat from the pan, "I was a Kur pet, and groomed my master, and bit the lice from his pelt. Now I am served by a Kur, before whom, once, I would not have dared to raise my eyes."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 621





 


Licorice
To The Top


He yelled something raucous and ribald. It had to do with "tastas" or "stick candies." These are not candies, incidentally, like sticks, as, for example, licorice or peppermint sticks, but soft, rounded, succulent candies, usually covered with a coating of syrup or fudge, rather in the nature of the caramel apple, but much smaller, and, like a caramel apple, mounted on sticks.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 81





 


Liquor - Liqueur
To The Top


She picked up the small tray from the stand near the table. On it was the small vessel containing a thick, sweet liqueur from distant Turia, the Ar of the south, and the two tiny glasses from which we had sipped it.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 10


It was now in the early evening. Miss Henderson and I, with small cups of a Turian liqueur before us, lounged in the living room.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 134


She carried a tray of tiny cups, filled with liqueurs.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 197


Doubtless both of them were soon to bring forth the next course of the meal, which I took to be assorted desserts, to be followed by black wine and liqueurs.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 237


"It is time to serve the liqueurs, Slave," I told her.
"Yes, Master," she whispered. She then rose to her feet and hurried toward the kitchen.
. . .
The collared softness of the dark-haired girl well set off the metal of the tray, and the small, multicolored glasses and bottles upon it.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 254


I sipped a Turian liqueur.
I sensed the lovely little dark-haired slave kneel down quite close to me, behind me and to my left. She put her hands about my left arm.
I savored the liqueur, and observed the dance of the slave.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 259


I took another sip of the liqueur. It was quite good.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 261


Similarly the hood is sometimes used when the master lends or consigns the slave to others, she being hooded, perhaps, before the guests arrive, or, perhaps, after she has served them their supper and liqueurs.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 160


I watched the men, talking, and finishing their liqueurs.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 284


"When it comes time to serve the liqueurs," said Susan, "you will serve those of Cos and Ar, and I will serve those of Turia."
"Yes, Mistress," I said. The liqueurs of Turia are usually regarded as the best, but I think this is largely a matter of taste. Those of Cos and of Ar, and of certain other cities, are surely very fine.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 406


"They are ready for their liqueurs," whispered Susan.

We then brought them to them, on the two small trays.

"Liqueurs, Masters?" asked Susan.

"Liqueurs, Masters?" I asked.

"Yes," said Drusus Rencius.

"Yes," said Publius.

Publius, to my surprise, selected a liqueur of Turia. "Those of Turia are the best," he said to Drusus Rencius, smiling, almost apologetically.

"Perhaps," smiled Drusus Rencius, "but I prefer those of Ar."

"In the judgment of liqueurs," said Publius, "patriotism is out of place."

"I have never confused objectivity with municipal pride," responded Drusus Rencius.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 407


"You will continue to serve," he said. "After dessert, we will have the coffee and liqueurs at the coffee table."
"Yes, Sir," said Ellen.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 105


Later, rising from her knees within, at a gesture from her master, the slave brought forth and served small glasses of Turian liqueurs.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Pages 696 - 697


The releaser, I am told, unlike slave wine, which is quite bitter, is quite pleasant, rather like a sweet wine, or fruit liqueur.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 524


The slaves now, at our supper, brought forth the Turian liqueurs.
"These are expensive," I said.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 578


"We have," said Kleomenes, "a rare liqueur of Turia which we were saving for the night of victory, the celebration of a successful hunt."

"This night then?" said Desmond of Harfax.

"Why not?" said Kleomenes.

"What liqueur?" asked Trachinos.

"That of Falnus," said Kleomenes.

"Aii!" said Trachinos.

"You know the liquor?" asked Kleomenes.

"I am from Turia," said Trachinos.

"I understand," said Master Desmond, "it is known even in Teletus."

"It is worth a golden tarsk in Ar " said Trachinos.

At a sign from Kleomenes one of his men left the fire, to seek the vicinity of their packs.

Shortly thereafter he appeared in the firelight bearing a small flask, sealed with golden cord.
. . .
"Raiders of the Wagon Peoples sometimes raid Turian caravans for this,
. . .

How fortunate we were, how privileged, how generous the master! Many free persons, doubtless, had never tasted a Turian liqueur, not to speak of that of Falnus.
. . .

It was like a sweet burning drop of liquid fire, flavored with flower herbs and, detectably, tospit and larma.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 414 - 415


The liqueur of Falnus, as was now obvious, had been drugged. It had been drunk largely because of the seal on the flask and, far more importantly, the freedom with which the hunters themselves had partaken of the fiery delicacy. It now seemed clear the seal had been broken earlier, and then, after the contents had been tampered with, had been restored, or at least given the appearance of having been restored.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 418





 


Liver
To The Top


"Now this," Saphrar the merchant was telling me, "is the braised liver of the blue, four-spined Cosian wingfish."

This fish is a tiny, delicate fish, blue, about the size of a tarn disk when curled in one's hand; it has three or four slender spines in its dorsal fin, which are poisonous; it is capable of hurling itself from the water and, for brief distances, on its stiff pectoral fins, gliding through the air, usually to evade the smaller sea-tharlarions, which seem to be immune to the poison of the spines. This fish is also sometimes referred to as the songfish because, as a portion of its courtship rituals, the males and females thrust their heads from the water and utter a sort of whistling sound.

The blue, four-spined wingfish is found only in the waters of Cos. Larger varieties are found farther out to sea. The small blue fish is regarded as a great delicacy, and its liver as the delicacy of delicacies.

"How is it," I asked, "that here in Turia you can serve the livers of wingfish?"

"I have a war galley in Port Kar," said Saphrar the merchant, "which I send to Cos twice a year for the fish."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 84 - 85


I tried the liver of the wingfish. Then another swig of Paga.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 86


(speaking of kailiauk)
The liver had already been removed from the animal, by the hunters. It is a great delicacy, and is commonly eaten raw.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 57





 


Lotus Roots
To The Top


He then addressed the other diners. "Note the kelp, the bamboo shoots, the fish, the lotus roots, and mushrooms."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204





 


Maize
To The Top


They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 234


"Masters?" asked Tuka, kneeling, holding the tray. We took the fried maize cakes from the tray.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 369


There I saw Seibar, who had once been Pumpkin, of the Waniyanpi, trading, in sign, with a Dust-Leg warrior. Seibar was offering a netted sack of maize.
. . .
Yet the rent for the tenancy had been set at one ear of maize per year, to be delivered to the reigning chieftain of the Isbu Kaiila. Yesterday this ear of maize had been delivered, with suitable ceremonies, to Mahpiyasapa.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 473





 


Marsh Shark
To The Top


We could see the black dorsal fin of the marsh shark about thirty to forty feet off, in the open water. It moved slowly about, out there. Occasionally, too, we saw the tip of its sicklelike tail cut the water, and saw the water stirring about its body.
. . .
The shark lay in the camp, among us, the rope by which it had been dragged to this location still on its tail.
. . .

A fellow nearby was sharpening a knife on a whetstone. It was his turn, as I recalled, to cut the meat.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 325 & 328





 


Mead
To The Top


"Here, Jarl," said Thyri, again handing me the horn. It was filled with the mead of Torvaldsland, brewed from fermented honey, thick and sweet.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 90


He grinned. "Gunnhild," said he, "run for a horn of mead."
"Yes, my Jarl," said she, and sped from his side.
In a moment, through the dark, smoky hall, returned Gunnhild, bearing a great horn of mead.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 95


"Mead!" called Ivar Forkbeard, from across from me.

"Mead!" He held out the great, curved horn, with its rim filigreed gold.

Pudding and Gunnhild knelt on the bench, snuggled against him, one on either side. But they did not run to fetch his mead. That duty, this night, befell another.

Hilda the Haughty, daughter of Thorgard of Scagnar, stripped as any bond-maid, from a large bronze vessel poured mead for the Forkbeard.

The men laughed.

She, though free, poured mead as a bond-maid. The hall roared with pleasure. Mighty insult had thus been wrought upon Thorgard of Scagnar, enemy of Ivar Forkbeard. His daughter, stripped, poured mead in the hall of his enemies.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 129


"Mead!" called Ivar Forkbeard, returning to the table. Pudding was first to reach him, with a horn of mead.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 133


Sweet and strong was the mead.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 191


My right arm was about her, holding her to me, in my right hand, held in its grip of golden wire, was a great horn of steaming mead.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 277


Bera went to the next man, to fill his cup with mead, from the heavy, hot tankard, gripped with cloth, which she carried.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 278


"For a man, to be great, needs great enemies, great foes." The Forkbeard then lifted his mead to Svein Blue Tooth. "You are a great man, Svein Blue Tooth," said he, "and you have been a great enemy."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 279


In the north generally, mead, a drink made with fermented honey, and water, and often spices and such, tends to be favored over paga.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 16


Slowly, within me, anger began to seethe, like the boiling mead, honeyed, bubbling, and fermented, sometimes prepared in the north, in the "country of dragons," the camps and villages above Kassau.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 198


But there are men who prefer ka-la-na and men who prefer paga, even men who prefer mead, or kal-da, even sake.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 173





 


Meal
To The Top


On market day I saw a peasant, his sack of Sa-Tarna meal on his back, whose sandals were tied with silver straps.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 248


I found quantities of slave meal, which is mixed with water;
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 210


They fed from bowls of slave meal, mixed with water.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 214


"Get bowls," said the red-haired girl to Ilene. "And open a bag of slave meal. When the slaves pass you, give each half a bowl of meal."
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 224


Another of the bond-maids was then freed to mix the bond-maid gruel, mixing fresh water with Sa-Tarna meal, and then stirring in the raw fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 63 - 64


The bond-maids did not much care for their gruel, unsweetened, mudlike Sa-Tarna meal, with raw fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 65


We had scarcely moved, save to pass about a verrskin of water and a leather pouch of Sa-Tarna meal.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 167


Beside my knee, in the dirt, there was a pan of water, and one of wet meal.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 193


She had shrunk back in horror from the gruel of meal and fish, fit provender for slaves, thrust in its pan into her cage.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 79


Kisu, leaving the raft, fetched two sealed calabashes of meal from where they floated in the marsh.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 268


The results of our trading had been two baskets of dried fish, a sack of meal and vegetables, a length of bark cloth, plaited and pounded, from the pod tree, dyed red, a handful of colored, wooden beads, and, most importantly, two pangas, two-foot-long, heavy, curve-bladed bush knives.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 287


"When the Mistress was finished with you," asked the girl, "did she not remove your chains and place a bowl of meal for you at the foot of her couch?"

"Yes," I said. I had been made to eat from it on my hands and knees, head down, not permitted to use my hands.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 133


Durbar left. In a few moments be returned with a small wooden bowl filled with dried, precooked meal. He poured some water into this. I was then handed the bowl.

Some of the women laughed.

"Mix it with your fingers," said the first man. Then he turned to Durbar. "Look about the camp," he said. "See if there are any more skulking about."

"I am alone," I told them.

But Durbar went to check.

I, mixing the water with the precooked meal, formed a sort of cold porridge or gruel. I then, with my fingers, and putting the bowl even to my lips, fed eagerly upon that thick, bland, moist substance.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 257


The wagon's lading was Sa-Tarna bread, and also, incidentally, Sa-Tarna meal and flour. It creaked under perhaps a hundred and fifty Gorean stone of such stores. These supplies, of course, were not intended for vagabonds or itinerants who might be encountered on the road but for the kitchens set up at the various nights' encampments.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 27


The meal or flour emerging from these devices is usually sifted, as it must often be reground, sometimes several times.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 18


I watched Phoebe pour some meal into the boiling, salted water.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 154


There was also a narrow paneled opening in the bottom of the door, also locked now; through which, when it was opened, a pan, say, of water, or bread, or dampened meal, might be inserted.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 196


Near me, as I brushed aside straw, I discovered two shallow, bowl-like depressions in the floor. My fingers touched water in one. In the other there was something like a bit of damp meal, surely no more than a handful, and a curl of something, like a damp crust.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 7


Fel Doron passed her again, this time carrying supplies from the kitchen, bread, biscuits, dried fruit, a bulging sack of meal, which supplies he placed in a nearby tarn basket.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 335





 


Meat Roll
To The Top


Vendors moved about, among them, proffering light foods and beverages. I lightly fingered the chain and sales disk at my throat. I saw a man buy a roll of meat, wrapped about a sauce.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 287





 


Melons
To The Top


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


"Buy melons!" called a fellow next to her, lifting one of the yellowish, red-striped spheres toward me.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 45


We did hear a man calling outside, selling melons.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 121


The incident had had to do with the theft of several melons from the chief's patch.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 219


There were probably few who thought that the little rogue of Schendi, the son of a lad who had once fled a village for stealing melons, would one day stand at the side of a throne.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 455





 


Milk
To The Top


They live on the meat and milk of the bosk.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 4


Not only does the flesh of the bosk and the milk of its cows furnish the Wagon Peoples with food and drink,
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 5


I heard the lowing of milk bosk from among the wagons.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 27


When the meat was ready Kamchak ate his fill, and drank down, too, a flagon of bosk milk; I did the same, though the milk, at least for me, did not sit too well with the Paga of the afternoon.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 138 - 139


Ho-Tu, I noted, but did not speak to him of it, drank only water and, with a horn spoon, ate only a grain porridge mixed with bosk milk.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 87


"What is this?" cried Ho-Sorl.
"It is bosk milk," Phyllis informed him. "It is good for you."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 241


Twice we stopped at palisaded villages, those of simple bosk herders. I liked these stops, for there we would have fresh bosk milk, still hot, and would have a roof over our heads for a night, be it only of grass.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 70


Then, kneeling, delighted, we were fed bread and roast tarsk, and hot bosk milk.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 88


I saw four small milk bosk grazing on the short grass.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


There were only a few bosk visible, and they were milk bosk.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 82


He had ordered roast bosk and hot milk, and then yellow bread and paga.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 289


kaiila milk, which is used, like verr milk, by the peoples of the Tahari, is reddish, and has a strong, salty taste; it contains much ferrous sulfate;
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 71


Too, she taught her skills useful to a Tahari female, the making of ropes from kaiila hair, the cutting and plaiting of reins, the weaving of cloth and mats, the decoration and beading of leather goods, the use of the mortar and pestle, the use of the gram quern, the preparation and spicing of stews, the cleaning of verr and, primarily when we camped near watering holes in the vicinity of nomads, the milking of verr and kaiila. Too, she was taught the churning of milk in skin bags.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 72 - 73


She had been carrying a large bag of churned verr milk on her head.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 89


Alyena threw herself to the floor before him, moving to the music. I supposed she saw in him her "rich man," who would guarantee her a life in which she might be protected from the labors of the free woman of the Tahari, the pounding of grain with the heavy pestle, the weaving of cloth, the churning of milk in skin bags, the carrying of water, the herding of animals with sticks in the blistering heat.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 101 - 102


The churning of milk and the pounding of grain were not for lovely Alyena.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 105


I tend the kaiila; twice daily I milk the she-kaiila;
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 139


Behind him was a herd of eleven verr, browsing on brownish snatches of verr grass. He would have defended the small animals with his life. Their milk and wool was his livelihood, and that of his family.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 167


Proteins, meat, kaiila milk, vulo eggs, verr cheese, require much water for their digestion. When water is in short supply, the nomads do not eat at all.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 226


Verr are to be milked, the eggs of vulos gathered, and the sleen must be watered and fed, and their cages cleaned.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 202


Two peasants walked by, in their rough tunics, knee-length, of the white wool of the Hurt. They carried staves and grain sacks. Behind them came another of their caste, leading two milk verr which he had purchased.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 47


"The milk of verr, the eggs of vulos!" I heard call.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 68


"It is not the bell of a Coin Girl," I said. "It is the bell of a vendor of bosk milk. He is making his rounds, coming up the street."
. . .
He then, ringing his bell, leaning into the traces, attached to two wooden handles, drawing his two-wheeled cart behind him, proceeded up the street.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Pages 161 - 164


Too, I had brought up a small bowl of powdered bosk milk.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 295


I watched her as she mixed in a plentiful helping of powdered bosk milk, and two of the assorted sugars.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 296


The smell of fruit and vegetables, and verr milk, was strong.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 60


"Verr milk, Masters!" I heard called. "Verr milk, Masters!" I opened the slats a tiny crack. I wished to see if she were pretty. She was, in her tunic and collar, kneeling on a white blanket, spread on the cement, with the brass container of verr milk, with its strap, near her, and the tiny brass cups. She was extremely lightly complexioned and had very red hair. "Verr milk, Masters," she called.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 61


There was a small dairy which supplied verr milk, and processed it, as wished, into derivative products, primarily cheeses.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 164





 


Millet
To The Top


The first feeding of field slaves is usually at dawn, or earlier, before they are sent into the fields. In the early afternoon water and a handful of millet suffices for them.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 209


I sat cross-legged in the small hut, across from Haruki, fingering millet into my mouth.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 291


He then cupped some millet, not rice, in his hand, and fed the slave.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 299


The common means of exchange were in terms of commodities, millet, rice, silk, coarser cloth, and such.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 316


As I have suggested, most exchange in the islands is done not in terms of coins, or notes, from one establishment or another on some Street of Coins, but in kind, in terms of rice, millet, fish, cloth, and such.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 350


"Enjoy your millet," I encouraged Tajima, wiping the last bit of grain out of the wooden bowl with my finger.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 372





 


Mint Sticks
To The Top


On the tray, too, was the metal vessel which had contained the black wine, steaming and bitter, from far Thentis, famed for its tarn flocks, the small yellow-enameled cups from which we had drunk the black wine, its spoons and sugars, a tiny bowl of mint sticks, and the softened, dampened cloths on which we had wiped our fingers.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 10





 


Molasses
To The Top


He then began to pass out, to the Dust-Leg men and women about, pieces of candy, lumps of cake sugar and flakes of dried molasses. The woman with whom I was dealing, too, received a palmful of molasses flakes.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 216





 


Mountain Deer
To The Top


"Meat is also available, Tarl Cabot tarnsman," he said. "I have seen to it. Coast gull, vulo, tarsk, verr, and mountain deer."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204





 


Mul Fungus
To The Top


I wondered about what Misk meant by 'processing' but Sarm's words irritated me, as did the two grave, handsome fellows who had so spontaneously groveled before his dais. "How is that?" I asked.

"Is it not obvious?" asked Sarm.

"No," I said.

"They are symmetrically formed," said Sarm. "Moreover they are intelligent, strong and in good health." Sarm seemed to wait for my reply but there was none. "And," said Sarm, "they live on fungus and water, and wash themselves twelve times a day."
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 95


"You have been assigned quarters," said one of the two slaves, "a case in the chamber of Misk."

I opened my eyes.

"We will take you there," said the other.

I looked at them blankly. "A case?" I asked.

"He is not well," said one of the slaves.

"It is quite comfortable," said the other, "with fungus and water."

I closed my eyes again and shook my head. I could feel them gently take my arms and I accompanied them slowly down the hall.

"You will feel much better," said one of them, "when you have had a bit of fungus."
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Pages 108 - 109


It is not hard to get used to Mul-Fungus, for it has almost no taste, being an extremely bland, pale, whitish, fibrous vegetablelike matter. I know of no one who is moved much in one direction or the other by its taste. Even the Muls, many of whom have been bred in the Nest, do not particularly like it, nor despise it. It is eaten with much the same lack of attention that we normally breathe air.

Muls feed four times a day. In the first meal, Mul-Fungus is ground and mixed with water, forming a porridge of sorts; for the second meal it is chopped into rough two-inch cubes; for the third meal it is minced with Mul-Pellets and served as a sort of cold hash; the Mul-Pellets are undoubtedly some type of dietary supplement; at the final meal Mul-Fungus is pressed into a large, flat cake and sprinkled with a few grains of salt.

Misk told me, and I believe him, that Muls had occasionally slain one another for a handful of salt.

The Mul-Fungus, as far as I can tell, is not much different from the fungus, raised under ideal conditions from specially selected spores, which graces the feed troughs of the Priest-Kings themselves, a tiny sample of which was once given me by Misk. It was perhaps a bit less coarse than Mul-Fungus. Misk was much annoyed that I could not detect the difference. I was much annoyed when I found out later that the major difference between high-quality fungus and the lower-grade Mul-Fungus was simply the smell. I was in the Nest, incidentally, for more than five weeks before I could even vaguely detect the odor difference which seemed so significant to Misk. And then it did not strike me as being better or worse than that of the low-grade Mul-Fungus.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 109


Inside the cube there were canisters of Mul-Fungus, a bowl, a ladle, a wooden-bladed Fungus-Knife; a wooden-headed Fungus-Mallet; a convenient tube of Mul-Pellets, which discharged its contents one at a time following my depressing a lever in the bottom of the tube; and a large, inverted jar of water, by means of which an attached, somewhat shallow, watering pan was kept filled.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 111


I stayed a long time in the washing-booth and when I came out and donned my plastic tunic it took quite some time to make the Mul-Fungus Porridge of just the consistency at which I preferred it, and then, since I had finally managed to make it the way in which it was least unpalatable, I took some time to, as one might say, almost enjoy it.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Pages 133 - 134


"What is in the containers?" she asked.

"Fungus," I said.

"What for?" she asked.

"You eat it," I said.

"Never," she said. "I'll starve first."

"You will eat it," I said, "when you are hungry enough."
. . .

"What do you mean?" I asked.

She laughed. "Fungus indeed!" she sniffed.

"It's not bad when you get used to it," I said, "but on the other hand it is not really particularly good either."
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 200


There I took a few minutes to replenish my energies from the containers of Mul-Fungus and I took a long welcome draught of water from the inverted jar in my case. As I ate the fungus and sat in the case I considered my future course of action.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 209


Some men from the Fungus Chambers carried on their backs great bags filled with choice spores, and others labored under the burdens of huge baskets of freshly reaped fungus, slung on poles between them; and those from the Pastures drove before them with long pointed goads huge, shambling gray arthropods, the cattle of Priest-Kings; and others from the Pastures carried in long lines on their shoulders the ropelike vines of the heavy-leaved Sim plants, on which the cattle would feed.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 236


My rations of Mul-Fungus had been cut by two-thirds since I had been captured.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 264


"Of course," said Kusk, "but it grows near the Ahn of the fourth feeding. I, for one, could use a bit of fungus and water."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 64


I had saved her a bit of fungus which she chewed on while sitting in the corner raptly unrolling a scroll.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 65





 


Mush
To The Top


There was no gruel here, no dried mush, no pellets.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 377


I then, a bit later, opened my mouth, widely, and a handful of slave gruel, or moist mush, was thrust in my mouth. One swallows it a tiny bit at a time, that one not choke. It is bland, and largely tasteless, but filling, for what one gets of it, and apparently nutritious.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111


I viewed one of the bowls, and approached it, and remained before it, on all fours.
In it was some sort of mush.
I would discover later it was warm.
I was terribly hungry.
"If you are pleasing," said the fellow, "we will put a biscuit in the gruel, and perhaps a bit of meat."
I determined that I would be as pleasing as I could. I wanted the biscuit, I wanted the meat.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 65


Later, a pan of hot mush was thrust through the narrow opening between the gate of the cage and its flooring. I lifted it to my mouth, with both hands, and ate, eagerly.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 124


He then took me by the hair, and forced my head down, holding it over the bowl of gruel, now little more than cold mush.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 270


There are, of course, many variations where slave gruel is concerned, ranging from bland mush to exotic mixtures that might tempt a free woman, were it not for the name. Needless to say, such mixtures were occasionally sold, and for a good price, to free women under different names. I had not, incidentally, thought the gruel of any particular note, but it was good enough, not that I had anything to say about such matters. Certainly I had been hungry, and that is often a great help, that serving to elevate one's assessments.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 534





 


Mushrooms
To The Top


"I am an Alar," Hurtha explained. "Have a stuffed mushroom."

I pondered the likely prices of a stuffed mushroom in a black-market transaction in a war-torn district, one turned into a near desert by the predations of organized foragers, in particular, the price of such a mushroom perhaps diverted at great hazard from the tables of Cosian generals.

"Have two," said Hurtha.

My heart suddenly began to beat with great alarm. "This is a great deal of food," I said, "to have been purchased by seventeen copper tarsks, and two tarsk bits." That was, as I recalled, the sum total of the monetary wealth which Hurtha had brought with him to the supply train, that or something much in its neighborhood.

"Oh," said Hurtha, "it cost more than that."

"I had thought it might," I said.

"Have a mushroom," said Hurtha. "They are quite good."

"What did all this cost?" I asked.

"I do not recall," said Hurtha. "But half of the change is yours."

"How much change do you have?" I asked.

"Fourteen copper tarsks," he said.

"You may keep them," I said.

"Very well," he said.

"I am quite hungry, Hurtha," said Boabissia. "May I have some food?"

"Would you like to beg?" he asked.

"No," she said.

"Oh, very well," said Hurtha. He then held out to her the plate of mushrooms. It did not seem to me that she needed to take that many. "Ah, Mincon, my friend, my dear fellow," said Hurtha. "Come, join us?"

I supposed he, too, would dive into the mushrooms. Still, one could not begrudge dear Mincon some greed in this matter, for he was a fine driver, and a splendid fellow. We had been with him now four days on the road. To be sure, we had received a late start on each of these days, and each day later than the preceding. It was difficult to get an early start with slaves such as Tula and Feiqa in the blankets. Boabissia, a free woman, must wait for us, of course, while we pleasured ourselves with the slaves. I think she did not much enjoy this. At any rate, she occasionally seemed somewhat impatient. Too, her irritability suggested that her own needs, and rather cruelly, might quite possibly be upon her.

Feiqa and Tula, those lovely properties, hovered in the background. I supposed that they, too, would want to be fed. I dared not speculate at what time we might be leaving in the morning. I hoped we could arouse Mincon and Hurtha at least by noon. There was even paga and ka-la-na. Mincon began to pick mushrooms off the plate and feed them to Tula. Did he not know she was a slave? "Thank you, Master," she said, being fed by hand. Sometimes slaves are not permitted to touch food with their own hands. Sometimes, in such a case, they are fed by hand; at other times their food might be thrown to them or put out for them in pans, and such, from which then, not using their hands, on all fours, head down, they must feed, in the manner of she-quadrupeds, or slaves, if it be the master's pleasure. Another mushroom disappeared. Had Tula not had some bread earlier?

"Have a mushroom," said Hurtha.

Mincon even gave a mushroom to Feiqa. I was watching. He was certainly a generous fellow with those mushrooms.

"No, thank you," I said. I wondered if, in the eating of such a mushroom, one became an inadvertent accomplice in some heinous misadventure.

"They are good," Hurtha insisted.

"I am sure they are," I said. I was particularly fond of stuffed mushrooms.

There was no problem for the slaves, of course. No one would blame them, any more than one would blame a pet sleen for eating something thrown his way.

Mincon and Boabissia might get off, I thought, watching them eat. After all, they did not know where the food came from. Mincon was a trusted driver, and a well-known good fellow. Boabissia was fresh from the wagons. She might be forgiven. Too, she was pretty. Hurtha, of course, might be impaled. I wondered if I counted as being guilty in this business whether I ate a mushroom or not. I knew where they came from, for example. It would be too bad to be impaled, I thought, and not have had a mushroom, at all. "What are they stuffed with?" I asked Hurtha.

"Sausage," he said.

"Tarsk?" I asked.

"Of course," he said.

"My favorite," I said. "I shall have one."

"Alas," said Hurtha. "They are all gone."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 81 - 83


"You asked her a question, beloved daughter," said Lord Yamada. "She responded as best she could. Dismiss her. Permit her to continue serving." He then addressed the other diners. "Note the kelp, the bamboo shoots, the fish, the lotus roots, and mushrooms."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204





 


Northern Shark
To The Top


The red hunters lived as nomads, dependent on the migrations of various types of animals, in particular the northern tabuk and four varieties of sea sleen. Their fishing and hunting were seasonal, and depended on the animals. Sometimes they managed to secure the northern shark,
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 36





 


Nutmeg
To The Top


There is little market in simple Laura for the more exquisite goods of Gor. Seldom will one find there Torian rolls of gold wire, interlocking cubes of silver from Tharna, rubies carved into tiny, burning panthers from Schendi, nutmegs and cloves, spikenard and peppers from the lands east of Bazi, the floral brocades, the perfumes of Tyros, the dark wines, the gorgeous, diaphanous silks of glorious Ar.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 86


In the cafes I had feasted well. I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48





 


Nuts
To The Top


There is food here, and water. I had found berries, and there were doubtless other things to eat, fruits and nuts.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 45


Some carried heavy baskets of fruits and nuts on their shoulders, or strings of gourds; others bore wicker hampers of flowers, or carried brightly plumaged forest birds, tied by string to their wrists.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 210


A cart was passing, flanked by huntsmen and slaves, bearing their burdens of gourds, flowers, nuts and fruits.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 213


Merchants brought sides of bosk, and thighs of tarsk, and wines and fruits to camp, and cheeses and breads and nuts, and flowers and candies and silks and honeys.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 321


"I lived for some days in the forest, but poorly, on berries and nuts.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 57


To the oases caravans bring various goods, for example, rep-cloth, embroidered cloths, silks, rugs, silver, gold, jewelries, mirrors, kailiauk tusk, perfumes, hides, skins, feathers, precious woods, tools, needles, worked leather goods, salt, nuts and spices,
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48


I knelt before the table on the second balcony, placing the tray on the floor and quickly, deferentially, placing its contents on the table, the assorted meats and cheese, the sauces and fruits, and wines and nuts.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 330


One plate was of meat, another of breads, another of sliced fruits, the fourth of nuts and cheeses.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 257


"Hurtha," said I, "what have you there?"
"Fruits, dried and fresh, candies, nuts, four sorts of meats, choice, all of them, fresh-baked bread, selected pastries," responded he, his arms full, "and some superb paga and delicate ka-la-na."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 80


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


Then, at a sharp clapping of Mrs. Rawlinson's hands, we leapt up and hurried to the kitchen, to bring forth the fare, the sweets, the candies, the nuts, the bowls of fruit, the herbs, the bread, flat, circular loaves of bread, which would be divided into eight wedges, the many covered dishes of boiled vegetables and hot meat, the vessels of wine, and such, and placed these on the serving table from which place we began to serve the guests.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 32 - 33


A round of ka-la-na had been first served, with a wrapper of nuts.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 633


Other than Tur-Pah, I could recognize the leafage which betokened Suls, usually found in the open, in drier, sandier soils, and was familiar with a number of edible nuts and berries, such as ram berries and gim berries, the latter common at this time of year.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 442


"The small chestnuts are excellent," said Lord Yamada. "Dip them in honey."
"Indeed," I said.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 200


"I was not paying attention," I said. "Perhaps I was distracted by the honeyed chestnuts."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 210


I had dined well on roast vulo, rice, and chestnuts.
. . .
I had scarcely finished the final chestnut, which I had been saving for dessert, when I heard steps outside the door.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 485


There were only the two soups, four vegetables, and two meats, roast Vosk gull and seasoned, boiled verr followed by fruit and nuts.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 160


And there would be, too, behind the counter, in baskets, grapes, tospits, larmas, nuts, and olives, and, in blocks, cheeses, and, in its amphorae to be lifted from its racks, cheap ka-la-na.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 251


The contents of the trencher still steamed. It was amply laden, with strips of roast bosk, suls hot with butter, a salad of tur-pah and nuts, slices of tospit, and two large wedges of fresh bread.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 268





 


Octopus
To The Top


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Olives
To The Top


The Tarn Keeper, who was called by those in the tavern Mip, bought the food, bosk steak and yellow bread, peas and Torian olives, and two golden-brown, starchy Suls, broken open and filled with melted bosk cheese.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 168


Clitus, too, had brought two bottles of Ka-la-na wine, a string of eels, cheese of the Verr, and a sack of red olives from the groves of Tyros.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 114


And there would be, too, behind the counter, in baskets, grapes, tospits, larmas, nuts, and olives, and, in blocks, cheeses, and, in its amphorae to be lifted from its racks, cheap ka-la-na.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 251





 


Onions
To The Top


"I have peas and turnips, garlic and onions in my hut," said the man, his bundle like a giant's hump on his back.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 29


"Dorna the Proud," said the slave, who tumbled onions, turnips, radishes, potatoes and bread into the feed trough.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 155


I did not much care for the crusts, and the onions and peas, on which we fed, but I did not expect to be eating them long.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 183


I and the others, from our pans, were eating one of our four daily rations of bread, onions and peas.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 184


Their food is that of a galley slave, peas, black bread and onions.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 304


I saw too, fields, fenced with rocks, in the sloping area. In them were growing, small at this season, shafts of Sa-Tarna; too, there would be peas, and beans, cabbages and onions, and patches of the golden sul, capable of surviving at this latitude.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48


It was a grim fate which awaited them, the confinement and pain of the benches, the weight of the long oars, the shackles, the whip, the drum of the hortator, the stench, the black bread and onions of the ponderous galleys.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 342


Lady Yanina, kneeling before a pan of water, under the supervision of Rowena, who was tending the fire, was washing and scraping garden vegetables, mostly onions, turnips and suls. These would later be used in a stew.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 248





 


Oysters
To The Top


Other girls had prepared the repast, which, for the war camp, was sumptuous indeed, containing even oysters from the delta of the Vosk, a portion of the plunder of a tarn caravan of Ar, such delicacies having been intended for the very table of Marlenus, the Ubar of that great city itself.
. . .
She threw me one of the oysters.
"Eat, Slave," she said.
I ate.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 301


Rask of Treve threw the girl one of the oysters, from a silver plate on the low, wooden table.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 302


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Palm Wine
To The Top


Schendi's most significant exports are doubtless spice and hides, with kailiauk horn and horn products also being of great importance. One of her most delicious exports is palm wine.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 115


"My recommendation," said Ayari, "would be to stab him when he is not looking, or perhaps to poison his palm wine."
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 429





 


Parsit
To The Top


The main business of Kassau is trade, lumber and fishing. The slender striped parsit fish has vast plankton banks north of the town, and may there, particularly in the spring and the fall, be taken in great numbers. The smell of the fish-drying sheds of Kassau carries far out to sea.
. . .
Trade to the south, of course is largely in furs acquired from Torvaldsland, and in barrels of smoked, dried parsit fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Pages 27 - 28


Like the bond-maids, she had been fed only on cold Sa-Tarna porridge and scraps of dried parsit fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 56


Three other men of the Forkbeard attended to fishing, two with a net, sweeping it along the side of the serpent, for parsit fish, and the third, near the stem, with a hook and line, baited with vulo liver, for the white-bellied grunt, a large game fish which haunts the plankton banks to feed on parsit fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 59


The men with the net drew it up. In it, twisting and flopping, silverish, striped with brown, squirmed more than a stone of parsit fish. They threw the net to the planking and, with knives, began to slice the heads and tails from the fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 61


The men who had fished with the net had now cleaned the catch of parsit fish, and chopped the cleaned, boned, silverish bodies into pieces, a quarter inch in width. Another of the bond-maids was then freed to mix the bond-maid gruel, mixing fresh water with Sa-Tarna meal, and then stirring in the raw fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Pages 63 - 64


Earlier he had been working with other thralls at the shore, with parsit nets.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 103


The parsit current is the main eastward current above the polar basin. It is called the parsit current for it is followed by several varieties of migrating parsit, a small, narrow, usually striped fish.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 38


If one is particular about one's food, one sometimes brings it with one, and instructs the keeper how it is to be prepared. Some rich men bring their own cooks. After all, one cannot always count on a keeper's man knowing how to prepare Turian vulo or Kassau parsit.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 52


"The men are pleased," said Lord Nishida.

"They see Parsit," said Cabot.

The Parsit, as many similar fish, require vegetation, and vegetation requires light, and thus, typically, such fish school off banks, in shallower water, where light can reach plants tenaciously rooted, say, some dozens of yards below in the sea floor. The banks are usually within two or three hundred pasangs of land masses. Thus the jubilation of the men.

"We are near land," said a man.

"It is too soon," said Lord Nishida, quietly.

Aź³©us, second to Tersites himself, bespoke himself, to Lord Nishida, politely, "You think they are open-water Parsit?"

Strictly there are no "open-water Parsit," that is, Parsit who would inhabit the liquid desert of a sea untenanted by a suitable food source, but the expression is often used of migratory Parsit. Great schools of migratory Parsit migrate seasonally, moving from the austral summer to the northern summer, as some birds, thus availing themselves of seasonal efflorescences of plant life. They fatten before each migration and, thousands of pasangs later, arrive, like migratory birds, lean and hungry, at familiar banks, thousands of pasangs from each other, where they are welcomed, again, with abundances of food. In this season they would be moving northward.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Pages 186 - 187


A number of slaves, too, some twenty or thirty, fastened together by the neck, by a long rope, had been given bags of water, bundles of dried parsit, sacks of rice, and such, to convey to the ship.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 408


"I hope they will have tarsk," said a man.
I hoped that, too, as I was growing weary of rice and parsit. The Pani do raise tarsk, verr, and, of course, vulos.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 425


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


One could smell fish. The early boats had come in. Grunt and parsit were strung between poles. Crabs were sold from baskets.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 68


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Pastes
To The Top


"Bring the paste of rence!" cried the girl. "Unbind his ankles. Take these ropes from his neck."

A woman left the group to bring some rence paste, and two men removed the marsh vine from my neck and ankles. My wrists were still bound behind my back.

In a moment the woman had returned with a double handful of wet rence paste. When fried on flat stones it makes a kind of cake, often sprinkled with rence seeds. "Open your mouth, Slave," said the girl.

I did so and, to the amusement of those watching, she forced the wet paste into my mouth. "Eat it," she said. "Swallow it." Painfully, almost retching, I did so.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 25


In the morning, before dawn, she had placed in my mouth a handful of rence paste. At noon, in the marshes, with the sun burning at meridian, she had taken another handful of rence paste from a wallet worn at her waist and thrust it in my mouth, again not permitting me the dignity of feeding myself.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 28


She laughed and reached into the wallet at her side and drew forth two handsful of rence paste and thrust them in my mouth.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 34


Then I shook out what food lay in the wallet, some dried rence paste from the day before yesterday, some dried flakes of fish, a piece of rence cake.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 65


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208


I scooped up a handful of rice paste from the shallow bowl to my right, and held it out, across the table.

The slave hurried to me, gratefully, and knelt, and put down her head. I held the rice paste to where she might take if from the palm of my hand. She fed, ravenously. I gathered it might have been several Ahn since the slaves had been fed in the pen.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 209


Pertinax reached into his shallow bowl of rice paste, to his right and gathered some of this into his palm.
She leaned forward.
But he put the paste into his own mouth, and slowly finished it.
"I do not understand," she said.
"You will go hungry," he said.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 212





 


Pastries
To The Top


"I shop for wealthy women," said she, "for pastries and tarts and cakes things they will not trust their female slaves to buy."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 238


During the time of the race the hawkers of candies, sweetmeats, Kal-da, pastries and paga were quiet, standing with their goods in the aisles watching.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 139


The hawkers of candies and such were now crying their wares. I heard a slave girl wheedling her master for a pastry.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 141


"Give her a pastry," said Cernus.
One of the men at the tables threw a pastry to Phyllis, which she caught. She stood there for an instant, the pastry clutched in her hands, her eyes suddenly brimming with tears, then she turned and fled from the room.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 188


Hup's attention was now drawn to the side of the table where there was a sugared pastry, which he began to eye hungrily.

Scormus of Ar, I was pleased to note, regarding the board, suddenly eyed Hup warily. Then the boy shrugged and shook his head, and moved another piece.

"Your move," prompted Philemon.

Without looking at the board Hup poked a Ubar's Scribe, with one of his swollen fingers. "Hup hungry," he whined.

One of Cernus' guards threw Hup the pastry he had been eyeing and Hup squealed with pleasure and sat on the dais, putting his chin on his knees, shoving the pastry in his mouth.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 326


In the private pens we were given better food, lean meats and vegetables and fruits, and, if our group had trained acceptably, after the evening meal, before being returned, hooded, to the public pens, we would be given candies or pastries, or, sometimes, a swallow of Ka-la-na wine.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 163


That evening, at our meal, I managed to steal a pastry from Ute. She did not even know who it was that removed it from her pan.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 196


"Tonight," said Lana, "if you are given a pastry, you must give it to me."

"Why is that?" I asked.

"Because we are friends," said Lana.

"I do not want to do that," I said.

"If you wish to be my friend," said Lana, "you will have to please me."

I said nothing.

"Very well," said Lana, looking away.

"Please, Lana," I whispered.

She did not look at me.

"I will give you the pastry," I said.

That night, before our departure, I had great difficulty in getting to sleep. Ute, Inge and Lana, all, slept soundly. I lay awake in the straw, looking up at the steel plating above me, dim, metallic, in the flicker of a lantern hung outside the cage, on a peg fixed into the wall on the opposite side of the corridor.

Tomorrow we would leave for Ar.

I was not much pleased with the evening feeding. Lana had taken the pastry, which I had agreed to give her.

And when I had attempted to steal that of the Lady Rena of Lydius, unseen by Rena, Ute's hand had closed on my wrist. Her eyes were very hard. I released the pastry. And Ute and I returned to our food pans. I had had no pastry this night! I was angry.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 201 - 202


Elsewhere I heard a vendor of pastries crying his wares.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 42


The baker's knot is supposed to minimize the amount of pilfering of pastries, and such, which might otherwise be done by slave girls.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 65


And it was Gunnhild who was thrown the pastry, to the delight of the crowds, shouting, pounding their spear blades on their wooden shields.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 154


Then, we again continued on our way, leaving the place of the platform, the place of Gunnhild's triumph, where she had received a pastry, and where her master, the Forkbeard, had made a silver tarn disk on her beauty. She gave the other girls crumbs of the pastry and permitted Dagmar, who was to be sold off, to lick frosting from her fingers.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 157


There was no swifter way for an Earth girl to learn Gorean, providing that candies and pastries, and little favors, like a blanket in the pens, were mixed in.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 13


A common problem with slave girls was petty thievery, as they attempted to steal pastries or sweets. Many slave girls have a craving for sweets. These are commonly kept from them. A girl might have to perform superbly for hours before her master before he, in his generosity, would consent to throw her a candy.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 77


"Put her at the slave ring," said Aurelion, "and give her ten lashes, and then throw her a pastry. She has done well."

"I shall, Aurelion," said Strabo.

In moments I knelt at the slave ring, my small wrists crossed and bound to it, the silk pulled away from me, down about my calves. I was struck ten times, and then released. A pastry was thrown to the floor before me. "You did well, Slave Girl," said Strabo. "Thank you, Master," I whispered. I reached for the pastry. The whip stayed my hand. "Forgive me, Master," I said. I took the pastry in my mouth.

"Chain her in the kennels," said Aurelion.

On my hands and knees, as a punished slave girl, holding the pastry in my mouth, I crawled from the floor to the kennels, followed by Strabo. There, at the concrete wall, on my blankets, I lay down. The chain and collar was fastened on my neck. Strabo left. I took the pastry in my hands, and began to eat it. What a fool I had been to beg my freedom. I had only to look in a mirror to see that I would never be free on Gor. I lay in the darkness of the long kennel, on my blankets, in my place, chained by the neck. I was a Gorean slave girl. Then I cried out with anguish, weeping, and hurled the pastry from me. I pounded at the concrete beneath the blankets. I wept. I had betrayed Clitus Vitellius, my master!
Strabo, accompanied by Narla, approached me. He poked me with a whip. "Be quiet," he said. She carried a lamp. She was eating the pastry which I had discarded.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 352


He sat, cross-legged, behind the low table. On it were hot bread, yellow sugars, slices of roast bosk, the scrambled eggs of vulos, pastries with creams and custards.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 20


For example, when a former free woman, now enslaved, steals her first pastry from another girl, this is often smiled upon, and punished, if at all, quite lightly.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 300


When she had had a good session Ulafi would sometimes, when he thought of it, throw her a bit of cake or pastry, which she would gratefully receive. She would then kneel before Ulafi and kiss his feet, clutching the bit of cake or pastry. "Thank you, Master," she would say. She would then kneel before Sasi, her teacher, and offer her the bit of cake or pastry, which Sasi would take, taking most of it and returning a portion of it to her. "Thank you, Mistress," she would say, for Sasi was first girl. She would then creep to her cage, and be locked within it. She would lie curled up in it, a lovely, helpless slave, and try to make the bit of cake or pastry last as long as possible.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 77


"And how is he rewarded?" she asked.
"An extra round of rations," said Kenneth, expansively, "some pastry upon occasion, sometimes with even a bowl of cheap wine."
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 236


Before each guests there were tiny slices of tospit and larma, small pastries, and, in a tiny golden cup, with a small golden spoon, the clustered, black, tiny eggs of the white grunt.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Pages 275 - 276


The girls, carrying their trays, knelt before the table. "Desserts, Masters," announced the girl in bluish gauze. Then, rising, they began to serve, one on each side. On one tray were assorted pastries; on the other was a variety of small, spiced custards.

"Pastries, Master?" asked the girl in bluish gauze.

I looked at her. Her small hands held the tray. On her tiny, lovely wrists, inflexible and close-fitting, were wrist rings, each securely locked. Chain, under the tray, dangled between the rings. Behind her, as she knelt on the tiles, there lay the chain which confined her ankles.

"You may now serve another," I said. I had taken a small pastry from the tray.

"Yes, Master," she said. "Thank you, Master."

She then rose, to serve Miles of Vonda.

Diagonally across the table and to my right the new voluptuous slave of Aemilianus knelt tremblingly before him, serving him. He was licking his lips. And I suspect it was not the custards on her tray which so moved his interest. Rather it was the first time that he had seen how beautiful she was in chains.

"Thank you for the pastry, Master," said Florence to Miles of Vonda.

In their serving the girls, of course, had ignored Peggy and Florence. It was as though they were not present. They were only slaves. But, of course, Miles of Vonda and Tasdron, of Victoria, their masters, had given them food from their plates. Florence had eaten well but Peggy had eaten hardly anything at all She could hardly take her eyes from the mighty Callimachus. Sometimes her hand moved towards him but she, an Earth-girl slave, dared not touch him.

The pastry was quite good.

I was very pleased with the way Lola had handled the meal. All was simple, tasteful and unpretentious.

"Excellent," said Tasdron, lifting a small pastry.

"Thank you," I said.
. . .

I took another pastry, and, with a movement of my hand, dismissed her.

She went then, again, to Miles of Vonda.

"Please, Master, that one," begged Florence.

He took the indicated pastry from the tray, gave it to the slave, and continued his conversation with Tasdron.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Pages 239 - 240


"Master, may I have that pastry?" asked Florence, indicating the one she desired.
"No," he said.
She knelt back.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 247


We then, from the tray, feeding ourselves, taking dates, and slices of larma and pastries, breakfasted and chatted.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 295


"I lived in Ar for a year," she said. "Not far from my apartments there was a pastry shop. Marvelous smells used to come from the shop. In the evening, when the shop was closing, slave girls, in their brief tunics and collars, would come and kneel down, near the hinged opening to the open-air counter. The baker, who was a kind-hearted man, would sometimes come out and, from a flat sheet, throw them unsold pastries."

I said nothing.

"How amusing I found that at the time," she said. "But, too, I sometimes wondered if the pastries I bought at that shop tasted so good to me as those the girls had begged did to them. They seemed so delighted to receive one. It was so precious to them."

I said nothing.

"If I were a slave in Ar," she said, "and I were permitted to do so, I think I should go to that pastry shop and, in my tunic and collar, kneel there with the other girls, hoping that I, too, might receive such a pastry."
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 333 - 334


I then bought her a pastry from a vendor. "Eat it," I told her, "slowly, very slowly. Make it last a long time."

"Yes, Master," she said.

When a woman is ordered to eat a pastry in this fashion, she knows that she is barely to touch it, and then only once in a while, with her small teeth. Rather, primarily, almost entirely, she is to address herself to it with her tongue. This puts her under a good discipline, is a good exercise for the tongue and tends to increase sexual heat. In the case of the free woman the tongue is usually something which serves rather conventional purposes, for example, it helps her to talk. In the case of the slave girl, however, it serves other purposes, as well.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 52


The slave girl whimpered, looking up at me. The pastry, which she had been diminishing, bit by minuscule bit, flake by tiny, damp flake, with her tongue, was clutched in both her hands. As she ate thus, the placement of her arms constituted a provocative modesty, one terminable, of course, at my will. Similarly, her small, delicate wrists were close together, so close that they might have been linked by slave bracelets.

"Please, Master," she whimpered.

"Hazard a game," suggested the paunchy fellow.

I looked down into the eyes of the slave girl. She looked up at me, and slowly and sensuously, with exquisite care, licked at the sugary, white glazing on the pastry. She might be helpless with need, but I saw she had had training.

"I have another game in mind," I said.

She looked up at me, flakes of the pastry and glazing about her mouth, and kissed me. "I want to love you," she said. I tasted the sugar on her lips.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Pages 55 - 56


"Hurtha," said I, "what have you there?"

"Fruits, dried and fresh, candies, nuts, four sorts of meats, choice, all of them, fresh-baked bread, selected pastries," responded he, his arms full, "and some superb paga and delicate ka-la-na."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 80


"And I will bring you a pastry later from the kitchen," she said, "and put it on the floor of your kennel. Though you will not be able to use your hands I expect that you will enjoy it, just the same."

"Thank you, Mistress," I said.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 257


And there can be intense competitions, it might be mentioned, not only for such treasures as the master's attentions and affections but for articles as ordinary as combs and brushes and prizes which, whatever may be their symbolic value, are often as small in themselves as a sweet or pastry.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Pages 220 - 221


Even had you lied about something as small as a candy or pastry we would not have accepted it. We approve of, and expect, truth from a slave.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Pages 324 - 325


I was grateful for his small kindness.
A touch, a smile, a candy, a pastry, mean much to us.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 160


Once or twice in the pens I had been given a candy, a hard candy, and once, a part of a pastry.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 184


"The provender of slaves," I said, "is designed to keep us healthy, trim, and vital, as the masters want us. It would be the same with other animals."

"Animals!" she breathed.

"Of course," I said. "But we get other things, too. The masters may feed us by hand, from their own plates, as we kneel by their tables, or throw us scraps, such things. Occasionally we may be given a candy, a pastry, such things. It depends on the master."
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 326


Before the divan, but a bit to the right, as I faced it, was a low table, on which there were beverages and fruits, and tiny bowls and plates, filled with an assortment of viands. I felt momentarily giddy with the smell of the roasted meats, the breads and pastry.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 376


Here and there I heard vendors hawking goods. One had pastries, another sweets. Another fellow, somewhere, was selling apricots.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 422


"Apricots! Apricots!" called a vendor.
"Pastries!" called another "Pastries!"
"Tastas!" called another. "Tastas!"
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 431


Tutina, then, placed the tray on the table. On the tray, tastefully arranged, with napkins, was a plate of small pastries, a saucer and cup, some sugars and creams, some spoons, and a small pot of coffee.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 32


"I awakened several hours later, toward noon, as though I might be in my own compartments, waiting for my girls to open the draperies and bring me steaming black wine and fresh, honeyed pastries,
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 65


Later, each slave brought forth, as well, a tray of assorted cakes and pastries.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 579


"You did well ," said Lord Grendel. "If we were home, I would cast you a pastry."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 474


It was a far cry from the provenders I had been taught to prepare in the house, ranging from roasted, seasoned bosk and tarsk and fresh plate breads, with honeys and butters, to frosted pastries and decadent, creamed sauces which, in some cities, were outlawed by sumptuary laws.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111





 


Peaches
To The Top


The fruit grapes and peaches of some sort was fresh and as cold as mountain snow.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 26


On the back of the kaiila, the black lance in hand, bending down in the saddle, I raced past a wooden wand fixed in the earth, on the top of which was placed a dried tospit, a small, wrinkled, yellowish-white peachlike fruit, about the size of a plum, which grows on the tospit bush, patches of which are indigenous to the drier valleys of the western Cartius.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 59


He looked at me shrewdly and, to my surprise, drew a tospit out of his pouch, that yellowish-white, bitter fruit, looking something like a peach but about the size of a plum.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 149


Another device, common in Port Kar, is for the girl to kneel before the master and put her head down and lift her arms, offering him fruit, usually a larma, or a yellow Gorean peach, ripe and fresh.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 27 - 28


The girl lifted her head then and, timidly, lifted the ripe, rounded fruit which she held in her hands, Gorean peaches and plums, to me.
. . .
I took one of the peaches and bit into it, watching her. She shuddered.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 194





 


Pears
To The Top


In her hand there was a half of a yellow Gorean pear, the remains of a half moon of verr cheese imbedded in it.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 62





 


Peas
To The Top


"I have peas and turnips, garlic and onions in my hut," said the man, his bundle like a giant's hump on his back.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 29


After a bit of cold bosk, some water and a handful of peas, I had come the House of Cernus.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 40


The food at the table of Cernus was good, but it was plain, rather severe, like the master of the House. I had tarsk meat and yellow bread with honey, Gorean peas and a tankard of diluted Ka-la-na, warm water mixed with wine.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 87


The Tarn Keeper, who was called by those in the tavern Mip, bought the food, bosk steak and yellow bread, peas and Torian olives, and two golden-brown, starchy Suls, broken open and filled with melted bosk cheese.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 168


I did not much care for the crusts, and the onions and peas, on which we fed, but I did not expect to be eating them long.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 183


I and the others, from our pans, were eating one of our four daily rations of bread, onions and peas. We were passing a water skin about among us.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 184


The great merchant galleys of Port Kar, and Cos, and Tyros, and other maritime powers, utilized thousands of such miserable wretches, fed on brews of peas and black bread, chained in the rowing holds, under the whips of slave masters, their lives measured by feedings and beatings, and the labor of the oar.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 13


Their food is that of a galley slave, peas, black bread and onions.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 304


I saw too, fields, fenced with rocks, in the sloping area. In them were growing, small at this season, shafts of Sa-Tarna; too, there would be peas, and beans, cabbages and onions, and patches of the golden sul, capable of surviving at this latitude.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81





 


Pellets
To The Top


for the third meal it is minced with Mul-Pellets and served as a sort of cold hash;
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 109


a convenient tube of Mul-Pellets, which discharged its contents one at a time following my depressing a lever in the bottom of the tube;
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 111


Fungus, water and pellets, and whatever else was needed, were apparently administered to the occupants of these cases from the outside by the Muls who attended them.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 190


It, like other aspects of our diet, the fruits and vegetables, and the cylindrical pellets we were given, seemed intended to slim our bodies and bring us to a peak state of health.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 66


The next morning I was fed, pellets and gruel, in a pan thrust under the kennel gate and then, later, when I had relieved myself, brought forth for the first of my lessons in dance.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 150


"It is better," I said. "Often we have only slave pellets and slave gruel."
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 326


There was no gruel here, no dried mush, no pellets. And I had not been fed since morning.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 377


"Open your mouth, slave," she heard, and she, head back, obeyed. A handful of slave pellets was thrust into her mouth.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 511


Yet, thought he, I do not think we are to be eaten, certainly not yet, for we have not yet been eaten, and, too, if we were to be eaten, would we not be fattened, or such, not given this gruel, these pellets, and water?
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 110


Pyrrhus then, with a movement of his clawed foot, slid a shallow pan, containing some pellets, before the girl.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 156


Occasionally we are given a handful of slave pellets. I do not know what is in them, but they are nourishing.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 251


Thus they might try to get their face into the pail, as might a tarsk or, more likely, given the size of the pail, be fed by hand, a cupped-hand of slave pellets being poured into the up-turned mouths.
. . .

"May I feed myself?" inquired Mila.

"Yes," I said.

"Thank you, Master," she said, and, putting two hands into the pail, carefully drew out two handfuls of the pellets.
. . .

"Shall I cast a handful of pellets on the ground for you," I asked, "and then you may, head down, not using your hands, feed?"

"Please do not," she said.

"Perhaps you would prefer to be fed by hand?" I asked.

"I am very hungry," she said.

"Would you prefer to be fed by hand?" I asked.
"Yes!" she said, shortly.

"You may then beg," I said.

"I beg to be fed by hand," she said.

I then, a pellet at a time, fed her, she reaching, delicately, to obtain the pellet.

"Keep your hands on your thighs," I cautioned her.

"Yes, Master," she said.

"I do seem to recall you," I said, "now that I think of it, from an emporium, faraway."

"I thought Master might," she said. "May I have more?"

"Yes," I said.

"But then," I said, "you were not kneeling, in a slave tunic, and collar."

"Please, Master," she said.

"I like you better as you are now," I said.

"Please, Master," she said.

I fed her, one after the other, two more pellets.

I then put a few in the palm of my hand, and let her take them from my palm. The pellets were dry, but her mouth and lips, and tongue and teeth, moving and nibbling, were moist.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 405 - 406


"While waiting," she said, "perhaps you would care for a handful of slave pellets or a bowl of slave gruel?"
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 385





 


Pemmican
To The Top


"Wakapapi," said Cuwignaka to me. This is the Kaiila word for pemmican. A soft cake of this substance was pressed into my hands. I crumbled it. In the winter, of course, such cakes can be frozen solid. One then breaks them into smaller pieces, warms them in one's hands and mouth, and eats them bit by bit. I lifted the crumbled pemmican to my mouth and ate of it. There are various ways in which pemmican may be prepared, depending primarily on what one adds into the mixture, in the way of herbs, seasonings and fruit. A common way of preparing it is as follows. Strips of kailiauk meat, thinly sliced and dried on poles in the sun, are pounded fine, almost to a powder. Crushed fruit, usually chokecherries, is then added to the meat. The whole, then, is mixed with, and fixed by, kailiauk fat, subsequently, usually, being divided into small, flattish, rounded cakes. The fruit sugars make this, in its way, a quick-energy food, while the meat, of course, supplies valuable, long-lasting stamina protein. This, like the dried meat, or jerky, from which it is made, can be eaten either raw or cooked. It is not uncommon for both to be carried in hunting or on war parties. Children will also carry it in their play. The thin slicing of the meat not only abets its preservation, effected by time, the wind and sun, but makes it impractical for flies to lay their eggs in it. Jerky and pemmican, which is usually eaten cooked in the villages, is generally boiled. In these days a trade pot or kettle is normally used. In the old days it was prepared by stone-boiling. In this technique a hole is used. This hole, dug either within the lodge or outside of it, is lined with hide and filled with water. Fire-heated stones would then be placed in the water, heating it, eventually, to boiling. As the stones cooled, of course, they would be removed from the hide pot and replaced with hot stones, the first stones meanwhile, if needed, being reheated.
"I am going to check the kaiila," said Cuwignaka. "I am going to hitch up the travois."

I nodded.

He wiped his mouth with the back of his forearm. He had been crouching near me, in the half darkness, the white dress marking his position, partaking, too, of the pemmican.

I smiled to myself. Both kaiila, one given to him by his brother, Canka, and the black kaiila, which had been mine, put at my disposal, with the permission of Canka, my master, by my friend, Grunt, the trader, were picketed but a few feet from the threshold of the lodge. Similarly the two travois, fashioned for the morning, were not more than feet away. Cuwignaka was eager.

I sat on the robes, in the half darkness, eating of the pemmican, in Canka's collar.
. . .
I sat on the robes, eating the crumbled cake of pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 46 - 47


I was thirsty from the pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 49


"Let us mount up," said Cuwignaka, swallowing down a piece of pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 239


He lay in the darkness, in Grunt's lodge. I had wished to return to this lodge. There were objects in it which remained of interest to me. In it, too, were stocks of dried meat and Wakapapi, pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 268


"We took pemmican," said the lad. "Are you going to kill us for stealing?"

"It was left for you," I said.

He extended his hand to me. In it was the small cake of pemmican which he had just seized up from the grass. "I took this, just now," he said.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 293


"She seems hungry," I said. I had noted that she was eyeing the cake of pemmican in his hand.

"Forgive me, Strawberry!" he said. "I am so thoughtless!" He quickly broke the cake of pemmican in two.

I put my hand on his arm. "You are the male," I said. "It is yours, not hers."

"I will share it with her, of course," he said.

"She has not yet begged," I said.

He looked at me, startled. Then he, in confusion, looked again upon the girl.

"I beg for something to eat," she said, smiling.

He quickly gave her half of the tiny cake of pemmican and she, on her knees, naked, swiftly, ravenously, ate it.

He then, musingly, regarding her, finished the remaining part of the cake of pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 294 - 295


"Thank you, Master," she said. She crawled toward me, on all fours, in the narrow pit. I put small pieces of pemmican in my hand. She fed from my hand. I put more pemmican in my hand. I then lowered my hand. I felt her kissing, nibbling and licking at my hand, taking the pemmican from it. I put more pemmican in my hand and then lowered it still further. I felt her hair on my body. She nibbled and kissed at my hand, delicately removing pemmican from it, her head following my hand, as I lowered it yet further, and then, with extreme delicacy, with tenderness and gentleness, she nibbled and kissed at my body. "Master desires his slave," she whispered.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 312


We then went and sat down where Mira, on leaves, had set forth our food.
We chewed the cold pemmican. We would not make a fire in this place.
From time to time, chewing, we cast a glance at Mira. She knelt to one side, her head down.
She was very beautiful. It was difficult not to anticipate the pleasures we would later receive from her.
I threw her a piece of pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 329


Cuwignaka brought some pemmican and a small water bag from a nearby lodge.
"Do you beg food, Slave Girl?" he asked Bloketu.
She looked at him. If she did not beg, she would not be fed. "Yes, Master," she said.
He then thrust pieces of pemmican at once, her meal, into her mouth, to save time.
"Chew and swallow, Slave," he said.
Bloketu obeyed.
"Do you beg drink, Slave?" asked Cuwignaka.
"Yes, Master," she said.
He then gave her a draught from the water bag. "Do you beg food, Free Woman," asked Hci.
"Yes, my captor," Said Iwoso, humbly.
He then thrust pemmican into her mouth, as Cuwignaka had with Bloketu.
"Chew and swallow, Free Woman," he said.
. . .
We divided the balance of the pemmican and water between us.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 420 - 421





 


Peppermint Sticks
To The Top


It had to do with "tastas" or "stick candies." These are not candies, incidentally, like sticks, as, for example, licorice or peppermint sticks, but soft, rounded, succulent candies, usually covered with a coating of syrup or fudge, rather in the nature of the caramel apple, but much smaller, and, like a caramel apple, mounted on sticks.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 81





 


Peppers
To The Top


Telima had prepared a roast tarsk, stuffed with suls and peppers from Tor.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 114


There is little market in simple Laura for the more exquisite goods of Gor. Seldom will one find there Torian rolls of gold wire, interlocking cubes of silver from Tharna, rubies carved into tiny, burning panthers from Schendi, nutmegs and cloves, spikenard and peppers from the lands east of Bazi, the floral brocades, the perfumes of Tyros, the dark wines, the gorgeous, diaphanous silks of glorious Ar.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 86


Some of the peppers and spices, relished even by children in the Tahari districts, were sufficient to convince an average good fellow of Thentis or Ar that the roof of his mouth and his tongue were being torn out of his head.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 46


In the cafes I had feasted well. I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428





 


Pit Fruit
To The Top


I took a slice of hard larma from my tray. This is a firm, single-seeded, applelike fruit. It is quite unlike the segmented, juicy larma. It is sometimes called, and perhaps more aptly, the pit fruit, because of its large single stone.
. . .
I broke off a piece of the pit fruit and handed it to him. He ate it quickly, watching me.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Pages 267 - 268





 


Plums
To The Top


From the garment, to the sand about her ankles, there fell several small Gorean plums, a small larma fruit and two silver tarsks.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 92


I was jostled to one side by two men in djellabas. My ankle stung. I had nearly stepped into a basket of plums. Not even looking up, a woman had cried out, and, with a stick lashed out, protecting her merchandise.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 45


The girl lifted her head then and, timidly, lifted the ripe, rounded fruit which she held in her hands, Gorean peaches and plums, to me.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 194


He also gave me a slice of dried larma, some raisins and a plum.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 216


"When are you to be there?" I asked.
"In Kantasawi," he said, "the moon when the plums are red."
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 253


"I do not understand," said Grunt. "It is not due until Kantasawi." This was the moon in which the plums become red. It is generally the hottest time of the year in the Barrens. It occurs in the latter portion of the summer.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 5


"Pomegranate orchards lie at the east of the oasis." I said. "Gardens lie inward. There is even a pond, between two of the groves of date palms."
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 174





 


Pomegranates
To The Top


From outside I could smell date palms, pomegranates.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 115





 


Porridge
To The Top


Muls feed four times a day. In the first meal, Mul-Fungus is ground and mixed with water, forming a porridge of sorts;
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 109


It took quite some time to make the Mul-Fungus Porridge of just the consistency at which I preferred it, and then, since I had finally managed to make it the way in which it was least unpalatable, I took some time to, as one might say, almost enjoy it.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Pages 133 - 134


Ho-Tu, I noted, but did not speak to him of it, drank only water and, with a horn spoon, ate only a grain porridge mixed with bosk milk.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 87


She would be hungry tonight and in the morning would have to go to the feed troughs in the quarters of the female staff slaves, probably for water and a porridge of grain and vegetables.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 89


"It seems to me," I said, "you lingered long over your breakfast."
"The porridge in the trough this morning," said she, "was simply marvelous."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 104


I shared the breakfast with Elizabeth, who informed me that it was better than the porridge below in the trough in the feeding room for female staff slaves, marvelous though the latter might have been.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Pages 106 - 107


"Girls in training," said Ho-Tu, "partake of the finest of slave porridges. They are given mats to sleep on, and later in their training, furs. They are seldom chained. Sometimes they are even permitted, under guard, to leave the house, that they may be stimulated and pleased by the sights of Ar."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 119


The girl was dragged out and her hands were braceleted behind her back. One of the smiths from below was summoned with a bowl of slave porridge, which he mixed half with water, and stirred well, so that it could be drunk. There are various porridges given to slaves and they differ. The porridges in the iron pens, however, are as ugly and tasteless a gruel, and deliberately so, as might be imagined. As the girl knelt the guardsman pulled back her head and held her nose while the smith, with thumb and forefinger, forced open her jaws and, spilling it a bit on her chin and body, poured a half cup of gruel into her mouth. The girl tried to hold her breath but when it became necessary for her to breathe she must needs swallow the gruel; twice more the smith did this, and then the girl, defeated, swallowed the gruel as he poured it into her mouth, half choking on it.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 126


I had carried about bowls of cut, fried fish, and wooden trays of roasted tarsk meat, and roasted gants, threaded on sticks, and rence cakes and porridges, and gourd flagons, many times replenished, of rence beer.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 44


Like the bond-maids, she had been fed only on cold Sa-Tarna porridge and scraps of dried parsit fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 56


You are worked hard here?" I asked.
"Oh, yes!" she laughed. "From morning to dark I am worked. I must gather brush and kaiila dung and make fires; I must cook the stews and porridges, and clean the pans and the bowls; I must shake out the mats and sweep the sand in the tents; I must rub the garments and polish the boots and leather; I must do the mending and sewing; I weave; I make ropes; I bead leather; I pound grain; I tend the kaiila; twice daily I milk the she-kaiila; I do many things; I am much worked."
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 139


"That is ten copper tarsks," had said the man last night, placing before me a bowl of sul porridge. I had not argued. I had paid him.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 38


"The porridge is ready," said the dark-haired girl with the spoon.
It was popping and bubbling.
. . .
Mira then returned from the porridge kettle and knelt near Cuwignaka. Head down, her arms extended, she proffered him porridge as she had me.
. . .
The dark-haired girl and the blond girl, who had shared in the stirring, who were sitting, cross-legged, near Carrot and Cabbage, rose to their feet, going again to the porridge line.
. . .
The two girls who had gone to the porridge line, the dark-haired girl and the blond girl, had returned a bit before, each with their bowl refilled with porridge. They had been in time, standing, watching, to see Mira put through her paces by Hci. They were almost trembling.
. . .
I handed the residue of my porridge, in its wooden bowl, back to Mira. I left the spoon beside me. She would not be so stupid as to ask for it. Slaves commonly eat without utensils. The porridge, by now, of course, had cooled.
. . .
Mira had fallen upon the porridge with gusto. She now, with her fingers and tongue, was wiping the bowl clean. She did not eat now as might a rich, free woman, from a golden service with Turian prongs, sumptuously, in some fine house. She ate now as a slave, and was grateful for her feeding.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 351 - 354


I, mixing the water with the precooked meal, formed a sort of cold porridge or gruel. I then, with my fingers, and putting the bowl even to my lips, fed eagerly upon that thick, bland, moist substance.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 257


"The Ahn is late," she said. "We have nothing but porridge left."

"It is three?" I asked.

"Yes," she said.

"I do not suppose," I said, "that if one orders the porridge, the bread and paga comes with it?"

"No," she said.

I had not, of course, expected any such luck, particularly after my conversation with the keeper. To be sure, even if perhaps a bit greedy, he was not a bad fellow. He had, for example, put the Lady Temione naked at the tables.

"Bread, paga, porridge," I said to her.

"Very well," she said.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Pages 70 - 71


I tasted the porridge. It had not yet been seasoned. Trying it, with one spoonful or another, from one vial or pot, or another, I seasoned it to my taste. I would later, now and then, here or there, in one place or another, mix in condiments. By such devices one obtains variety, or its deceptive surrogate, even in a substance seemingly so initially unpromising as inn porridge.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 73


"The porridge water should be salted," I said.
"Yes, Master," she said, and crawled to the front of the tent.
"Salt it lightly," I said. She was learning to serve.
"Yes, Master," she said.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 152


She spooned the porridge into the bowls and set the bread, wedges, from a round, flat loaf, on the trenchers, and knelt back. She would wait, of course, until I had taken the first bite.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 158


I felt about in the darkness, hoping to find food. There was a depression in the floor, which contained some water. Obviously I could not lift it, and, after trying to cup water in my hands, with little success, given the shallowness of the depression, I bent down, and lapped at it. I felt about and located the food pan, which contained some porridge-like material, and a thick crust of bread.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 64





 


Potatoes
To The Top


"Dorna the Proud," said the slave, who tumbled onions, turnips, radishes, potatoes and bread into the feed trough.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 155





 


Pudding
To The Top


Verr was roasted, and puddings made.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 238





 


Pumpkin
To The Top


"Many of the tribes permit small agricultural communities to exist within their domains," she said. "The individuals in these communities are bound to the son and owned collectively by the tribes within whose lands they are permitted to live. They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 233 - 234





 


Qualae
To The Top


Small straight bows, of course, not the powerful long bow, are, on the other hand, reasonably common on Gor, and these are often used for hunting light game, such as the brush-maned, three-toed Qualae, the yellow-pelted, single-horned Tabuk, and runaway slaves.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 4





 


Radishes
To The Top


"Dorna the Proud," said the slave, who tumbled onions, turnips, radishes, potatoes and bread into the feed trough.

"What happened to Lara?" I asked.

He laughed. "You are ignorant!" he exclaimed.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 155


Ottar dug for the Forkbeard and myself two radishes and we, wiping the dirt from them, ate them.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 102


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37





 


Raisins
To The Top


I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48


He also gave me a slice of dried larma, some raisins and a plum.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 216





 


Ram-berries
To The Top


A guard was with us, and we were charged with filling our leather buckets with ram-berries, a small, reddish fruit with edible seeds, not unlike tiny plums, save for the many small seeds. I had picked such berries before, with Targo's caravan. Indeed, the first fruit on Gor I had eaten had been such berries.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 305


Late in the afternoon, I was sent outside, leashed again with Techne, to pick ram-berries.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 316





 


Rence Beer
To The Top


At such times there is drinking of rence beer, steeped, boiled and fermented from crushed seeds and the whitish pith of the plant;
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 18


I had also been used to carry heavy kettles of rence beer from the various islands to the place of feasting, as well as strings of water gourds, poles of fish, plucked gants, slaughtered tarsks, and baskets of the pith of rence.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 41


I had carried about bowls of cut, fried fish, and wooden trays of roasted tarsk meat, and roasted gants, threaded on sticks, and rence cakes and porridges, and gourd flagons, many times replenished, of rence beer.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 44





 


Rence Cake
To The Top


In a moment the woman had returned with a double handful of wet rence paste. When fried on flat stones it makes a kind of cake, often sprinkled with rence seeds. "Open your mouth, Slave," said the girl.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 25


She herself nibbled on a rence cake, watching me, and then on some dried fish which she drew also from the wallet.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 34


Around the tenth Gorean hour, the Gorean noon, the rencers ate small rence cakes, dotted with seeds, drank water, and nibbled on scraps of fish. The great feast would be in the evening.

Around this time a small boy had come to stare at me, a half-eaten rence cake in his hand.

"Are you hungry?" he had asked.

"Yes," I had told him.

He had held the rence cake up to me and I bit at it, eating it.

"Thank you," I had said to him.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 41


I had carried about bowls of cut, fried fish, and wooden trays of roasted tarsk meat, and roasted gants, threaded on sticks, and rence cakes and porridges, and gourd flagons, many times replenished, of rence beer.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 44


She was eating a rence cake. Her mouth was half full. She looked at me. "I shall not bind you tonight," she said.

Holding half the rence cake in her mouth she unrolled her sleeping mat and then, as she had the night before, she unlaced her tunic and slipped it off over her head. She threw it to the corner of the hut, on her left, near her feet. She sat on the sleeping mat and finished the rence cake. Then she wiped her mouth with her arm, and slapped her hands together, freeing them of crumbs.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 48


Then I shook out what food lay in the wallet, some dried rence paste from the day before yesterday, some dried flakes of fish, a piece of rence cake.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 65


In the darkness, Telima and I finished some rence cake we had brought from the island, and drank some water.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 73


She wiped the last of the crumbs of rence cake from her mouth with the back of her left hand.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 77





 


Rence Paste
To The Top


"Bring the paste of rence!" cried the girl. "Unbind his ankles. Take these ropes from his neck."

A woman left the group to bring some rence paste, and two men removed the marsh vine from my neck and ankles. My wrists were still bound behind my back.

In a moment the woman had returned with a double handful of wet rence paste. When fried on flat stones it makes a kind of cake, often sprinkled with rence seeds. "Open your mouth, Slave," said the girl.

I did so and, to the amusement of those watching, she forced the wet paste into my mouth. "Eat it," she said. "Swallow it." Painfully, almost retching, I did so.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 25


In the morning, before dawn, she had placed in my mouth a handful of rence paste. At noon, in the marshes, with the sun burning at meridian, she had taken another handful of rence paste from a wallet worn at her waist and thrust it in my mouth, again not permitting me the dignity of feeding myself.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 28


She laughed and reached into the wallet at her side and drew forth two handsful of rence paste and thrust them in my mouth.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 34


Then I shook out what food lay in the wallet, some dried rence paste from the day before yesterday, some dried flakes of fish, a piece of rence cake.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 65





 


Rence Pith
To The Top


The plant has many uses besides serving as a raw product in the manufacture of rence paper. The root, which is woody and heavy, is used for certain wooden tools and utensils, which can be carved from it; also, when dried, it makes a good fuel; from the stem the rence growers can make reed boats, sails, mats, cords and a kind of fibrous cloth; further, its pith is edible, and for the rence growers is, with fish, a staple in their diet; the pith is edible both raw and cooked; some men, lost in the delta, not knowing the pith edible, have died of starvation in the midst of what was, had they known it, an almost endless abundance of food.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 7


At such times there is drinking of rence beer, steeped, boiled and fermented from crushed seeds and the whitish pith of the plant;
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 18


In the stem of the girl's rence craft, she poling the craft from its stern, I knelt, cutting rence. It was late in the year to cut rence but some quantities of the rence are cut during the fall and winter and stored on covered rence rafts until the spring. These stores of rence are not used in the making of rence paper, but in the weaving of mats, for adding to the surface of the island, and for the pith, used as a food.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 27


There would be something edible on the island, if only the pith of rence. I hoped there would be water.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 63





 


Rence Seeds
To The Top


At such times there is drinking of rence beer, steeped, boiled and fermented from crushed seeds and the whitish pith of the plant;
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 18


In a moment the woman had returned with a double handful of wet rence paste. When fried on flat stones it makes a kind of cake, often sprinkled with rence seeds.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 25


Around the tenth Gorean hour, the Gorean noon, the rencers ate small rence cakes, dotted with seeds, drank water, and nibbled on scraps of fish.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 41





 


Rice
To The Top


I went to the side and removed a bowl from its padded, insulating wrap. Its contents were still warm. It was a mash of cooked vulo and rice. Earlier I had taken Yanina to the kitchen. There, under my supervision, on her chain, kneeling, she had cooked it. It was perhaps the first thing she had ever cooked. I had, too, once, later in the afternoon, taken her into a couple of rooms, where I had her tidy them up. It pleased me to see her, once the proud Lady Yanina, helplessly performing these small, domestic tasks. Being a slave is a whole way of life, involving a total modality of existence. There is a great deal more to it than simply serving a master in the furs.

"Eat," I said to Flaminius, spooning some vulo and rice into his mouth. Then, in a bit, I took the bowl, the spoon in it, to where the girl lay. "Kneel," I said to her.

"Yes, Master," she said.

I then took bits of vulo from the bowl and held them out to the girl. I also put some rice in the palm of my hand, from which she took it.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Pages 379 - 380


There are rice fields on Gor, in the vicinity of Bazi, famed for its teas, but rice is not as familiar on Gor as the grain, sa-tarna. And Pani, as far as I knew, were not found in Bazi, or its environs. To be sure I supposed the rice might be Bazi rice, but I was not sure of that, not at all sure of it.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 409


When the men chose to leave the castle, they were given marked shells, rather like ostraka. These could be exchanged for things in the villages, fish, rice, sake, a fermented drink made from rice, and such, and, in the stalls, beads, cloth, trinkets, and such.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 404


The staple in the Twelve Islands, which is actually far more than twelve, is not Sa-Tarna, but rice.

Rice fields, or paddies, are associated with each village. A daimyo or shogun will have suzerainty over various villages, which he protects, and from which he obtains the means to maintain his men.

He who controls the rice, it is said, controls the islands.

Several rice fields were associated with the holding of Lord Temmu, most north and west of the castle.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Pages 406 - 407


A number of slaves, too, some twenty or thirty, fastened together by the neck, by a long rope, had been given bags of water, bundles of dried parsit, sacks of rice, and such, to convey to the ship.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 408


"I hope they will have tarsk," said a man.
I hoped that, too, as I was growing weary of rice and parsit.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 425


The Pani are fond of rice. It is sometimes boiled in a helmet.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 112


"For what were they sold?" I asked.
"Rice," he said.
"Lord Yamada is generous," I said.
"He is a great lord," said the Ashigaru.
"Much rice?" I said.
"Most," he said, "were exchanged for one fukuro of rice, some for two."
"That is not much," I said. The most common fukuro of rice, or bag or sack of rice, as I had seen it measured out in the holding, and at the encampments, would weigh less than a half stone.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Pages 65 - 66


The large shed housing the pens was but a short walk from the courtyard; it was not unlike such sheds elsewhere in the vicinity, rudely planked, and low roofed, used for storage,- and the stabling of beasts, verr, tarsk, and slaves. Some such sheds are also used for the housing of rice seedlings, which are later transferred to designated paddies, or wading fields. Harvested grains are commonly dried in the sun in Se'Kara, before the Seventh Passage Hand. Most rice is grown in village fields, several villages often under the rule of a single daimyo. These villages pay the rice tax, supplied primarily in produce, rice itself, to the daimyo and the shogun receives his tax, usually in kind, as well, from the daimyos. Sometimes, too, the tax is supplied in terms of men, serving as porters, workers, and Ashigaru. Some villages, on the other hand, are under the rule of the shogun himself, so he profits both in virtue of a direct and an indirect tax. To be sure, silver, gold, and copper also function as means of exchange in the islands, either in the form of marked coinages or as plates and bars. Similarly various forms of produce other than rice may be taxed, exchanged by bartering, and so on. Fishing villages, of course, share portions of their catch, fresh or dried, with their patrons and protectors, these goods gathered by low-level administrative officials. A great deal of the exchange in the islands is effected by barter. It was thus not all that unusual that many of the slaves of the holding of Lord Temmu had been exchanged for rice. What was unusual was the desperation on the part of the besieged to obtain rice, and the ratio of exchange, often as surprising as one fukuro for a slave.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Pages 181 - 182


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208


As I have suggested, most exchange in the islands is done not in terms of coins, or notes, from one establishment or another on some Street of Coins, but in kind, in terms of rice, millet, fish, cloth, and such.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 350


By now the fellow who had rushed away for the bowl of rice had returned, apparently with a vendor's man, who held, cushioned by layers of cloth, a large bowl of steaming rice in two hands.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 456


I had dined well on roast vulo, rice, and chestnuts.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 485


He then thrust the prong once more into the bowl, secured some three or four more slices, and slid them onto his plate, which was already laden with parsley, steamed rice, fried verr, and roast bosk.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 398


My serving dish was shortly empty, and I knew I should withdraw to the kitchen, either to have it layered with more syrupped tospit slices, or supplied with another provender, perhaps rice, white, or brown, or red or purple, from Cos,
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 401





 


Rice Cakes
To The Top


They removed the silken covers and we noted the hampers were heaped with fruits, vegetables, cakes of rice, smoked fish, layers of dried, salted meat, and stoppered vessels which I supposed might contain sake, and perhaps, considering the continental mercenaries in the camp, none of whom had been permitted, save myself, to attend these proceedings, paga and ka-la-na.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 55





 


Rice Paste
To The Top


I scooped up a handful of rice paste from the shallow bowl to my right, and held it out, across the table.

The slave hurried to me, gratefully, and knelt, and put down her head. I held the rice paste to where she might take if from the palm of my hand. She fed, ravenously. I gathered it might have been several Ahn since the slaves had been fed in the pen.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 209


Pertinax reached into his shallow bowl of rice paste, to his right and gathered some of this into his palm.
She leaned forward.
But he put the paste into his own mouth, and slowly finished it.
"I do not understand," she said.
"You will go hungry," he said.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 212





 


Roast
To The Top


At my father's insistence, I began to eat, reluctantly, never taking my eyes from him, hardly tasting the food, which was simple but excellent. The meat reminded me of venison; it was not the meat of an animal raised on domestic grains. It had been roasted over an open flame.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 26


I thought of the yellow Gorean bread, baked in the shape of round, flat loaves, fresh and hot; my mouth watered for a tabuk steak or, perhaps, if I were lucky, a slice of roast tarsk, the formidable six-tusked wild boar of Gor's temperate forests.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 76


The proprietor arrived with hot bread, honey, salt and, to my delight, a huge, hot roasted chunk of tarsk.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 79


Surely I had enjoyed the scent of flowers and women, of hot, fresh bread, roasted meat, Paga and wines, harness leather, the oil with which I protected the blade of my sword from rust, of green fields and storm winds, but seldom had I considered the sense of smell in the way one would consider that of vision or touch, and yet it too had its often neglected store of information ready for the man who was ready to make use of it.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 56


The warrior leapt from the dais and, in a few moments, returned with a handful of roasted bosk meat.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 54


I tried the liver of the wingfish. Then another swig of Paga.

Saphrar winced.

"Perhaps," he suggested, "you would like a piece of roasted bosk meat?"

I replaced the golden eating prong in its rack beside my place, shoved back the glittering dish in which lay several theoretically edible objects, carefully arranged by a slave to resemble a bouquet of wild flowers sprouting from a rock outcropping. "Yes," I said, "I think so."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 86


My piece of bosk meat, roasted, had arrived. I picked it up and began to chew on it. I liked it better cooked over the open-fires on the prairie, but it was good bosk. I sank my teeth into the juicy meat, tearing it and chewing on it.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 89


Elizabeth had the meat roasted, though it was now considerably overdone.

"The meat is overdone," said Kamchak.

"They are both stinking drunk," said Aphris of Turia.

I looked at her. Both of them were beautiful.

"No," I corrected her, "gloriously inebriated."

Kamchak was looking closely at the girls, leaning forward, squinting.

I blinked a few times.

"Is anything wrong?" asked Elizabeth Cardwell.

I noted that there was a large welt on the side of her face, that her hair was ripped up a bit and that there were five long scratches on the left side of her face.

"No," I said.

Aphris of Turia appeared in even worse shape. She had surely lost more than one handful of hair. There were teeth marks in her left arm and, if I was not mistaken, her right eye was ringed and discolored.

"The meat is overdone," grumbled Kamchak. A master takes no interest in the squabbles of slaves, it being beneath him. He of course would not have approved had one of the girls been maimed, blinded or disfigured.

"Have the bosk been tended?" asked Kamchak.

"Yes," said Elizabeth firmly.

Kamchak looked at Aphris. "Have the bosk been tended?" he asked.

She looked up suddenly, her eyes bright with tears. She cast an angry look at Elizabeth. "Yes," she said, "they have been tended."

"Good," said Kamchak, "good." Then he pointed at the meat. "It is overdone," he said.

"You were hours late," said Elisabeth

"Hours," repeated Aphris.

"It is overdone," said Kamchak.

"I shall roast fresh meat," said Elizabeth, getting up, and she did so. Aphris only sniffed.

When the meat was ready Kamchak ate his fill, and drank down, too, a flagon of bosk milk; I did the same, though the milk, at least for me, did not sit too well with the Paga of the afternoon.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 138 - 139


Harold and I chewed on some bosk meat roasted over a fire built on the marble floor of the palace of Phanius Turmus.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 271


"Have you eaten?" she asked.
"Yes," I said.
"There is some roast bosk left," she said. "It is cold. It would be a bother to warm it up, so I will not do so. I am not a slave girl, you know."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 283 - 284


Roasted tarsks on long spits were borne to the tables on the shoulders of nude slave girls.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 311


Before the feast I had helped the women, cleaning fish and dressing marsh gants, and then, later, turning spits for the roasted tarsks, roasted over rence-root fires kept on metal pans, elevated above the rence of the island by metal racks, themselves resting on larger pans.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 44


Telima had prepared a roast tarsk, stuffed with suls and peppers from Tor.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 114


The slave boy, Fish, had emerged from the kitchen, holding over his head on a large silver platter a whole roasted tarsk, steaming and crisped, basted, shining under the torchlight, a larma in its mouth, garnished with suls and Tur-Pah.

The men cried out, summoning him to their table.

It had been on one side, a land side, of that last remaining fortress of Henrius Sevarius, that Lysias, Henrak, and others had emerged from a postern, carrying the heavy sack which they had hurled into the canal, that sack from which I had saved the boy.

Fish put down the whole roasted tarsk before the men. He was sweating. He wore a single, simple rep-cloth tunic. I had had a plate collar hammered about his neck. I had had him branded.

The men ordered him away again, that he might fetch yet another roasted tarsk from the spit which he had been turning slowly over the coal fires during the afternoon.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Pages 219 - 220


then, before each of us, on the grass, the guards threw a large piece of cooked meat. I was famished and, burning my fingers, I clutched at it, and, half-choking, thrust it half into my mouth, tearing at it with my teeth and hands, the juices running at the sides of my mouth. I think few of my friends would have recognized the sophisticated, tasteful Elinor Brinton in the naked Gorean slave girl, chained, kneeling on the grass, thrusting meat into her mouth, tearing at it, her head back in ecstasy, feeding, the juices of the meat running on her body. It was only roast bosk, and half raw, but I devoured it.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 65 - 66


We, in coffle, followed this road. I liked the smell of Laura, the fresh fields before the forests, even the smell of the river and the wood. We could smell roast tarsk from somewhere.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 87


The smell of roast tarsk became stronger and, to our delight, the wagons turned and rolled into one of the huge warehouses. The floor was smooth. When we were inside the doors were closed. Then, kneeling, delighted, we were fed bread and roast tarsk, and hot bosk milk.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 88


The food had been good, bread and bosk meat, roasted, and cheese, and larma fruit.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 270


I smelled roast bosk cooking, and fried vulo.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 34


The two bond-maids, stripped, too, like the others, for the feast, Pretty Ankles and Pouting Lips, struggled down the length of the smoky, dark hall, a spitted, roasted tarsk on their shoulders. They were slapped by the men, hurrying them along. They laughed with pleasure. Their shoulders were protected from the heat of the metal spit by rolls of leather. The roasted tarsk was flung before us on the table. With his belt knife, thrusting Pudding and Gunnhild back, Ivar Forkbeard addressed himself to the cutting of the meat. He threw pieces down the length of the table.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 91


Many were the roast tarsk and roast bosk that had roasted over the long fire, on the iron spits. Splendid was the quality of the ale at the tables of the Blue Tooth. Sweet and strong was the mead.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 191


We passed five men, about fire, roasting a haunch of Kur. The smell was heavy, and sweet, like blood.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 260


And brightly glowed the long fire in the hall, over which tarsk and bosk, crackling and glistening with hot fat, roasted, turned heavily on spits by eager, laughing bond-maids.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 279


In the cafes I had feasted well. I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48


On the dais, with him, were several men, low tables of food, fruit, stews, tidbits of roast verr, assorted breads.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 212


Eta hummed and sang as she tended the roasting meat, heavy and hot, dripping fat, hissing, into the fire, on its greenwood spit.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 52


Verr was roasted, and puddings made. Sa-Tarna bread was brought forth and heated. Sul paga poured freely.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 238


He sat, cross-legged, behind the low table. On it were hot bread, yellow sugars, slices of roast bosk, the scrambled eggs of vulos, pastries with creams and custards.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 20


"Where are the merchant tables," I asked a fellow from Torvaldsland, with braided blond hair and shaggy jacket, eating on a roast hock of tarsk, "where the odds on the Kaissa matches are being given?"
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 43


"Have some meat," I said to him. I had been roasting some bosk over the small fire.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 127


I smelled roast tabuk.
The great hunt had been successful.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 195


He was chewing on a leg of roast vulo.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 353


I saw market stalls and heard the cries of vendors hawking their goods. I smelled fresh vegetables and roasting meat.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 124


"It is a small dish," said the Lady Florence, "the white meat of roast vulos, prepared in a sauce of spiced Sa-Tarna and Ta wine."
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 286


"Meat, Master?" asked a girl, nude, who knelt now beside me. She offered a tray on which small cubes of roasted bosk, on tiny sticks, steamed. I took several, dipping them by the sticks, in a sauce, carried on the same tray. I returned the tiny sticks to the tray and looked at the girl.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 192


"More, Master?" inquired the slave in bluish gauze, in the gleaming collar, kneeling behind me and to my left.
"Yes," I said.
With a serving prong she placed narrow strips of roast bosk and fried sul on my plate.
"Enough, Girl," I said.
"Yes, Master," she said.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 234


Evelyn then threw each of the girls a piece of meat, throwing it to the grass before them. She removed these pieces of meat from the slender greenwood spit on which they had been roasted.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 157


"And what luckless slave is now your quarry?" inquired Elto.
"No slave," said Hassan, chewing on the leg of a roasted vulo, tearing meat from it with his teeth.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 306


I took a piece of meat from the table, one of the viands I had brought from the camp, a small tidbit of roast tarsk. I held it out to her.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 116


The suspension of the meat reminded me of the way peasant women sometimes cook roasts, tying them on a cord and dangling them before the fire, then spinning the meat from time to time. In this way, given the twisting and untwisting of the cord, the meat will cook rather evenly, for the most part untended, and without spit turning.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 120


"Roast tarsk!" announced Philebus, proudly, approaching the burly fellow, gesturing to one of his helpers, who was accompanying him, bearing a tray of steaming meat. The burly fellow seized a joint of hot, dripping tarsk from the platter and bit into it.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 25


Before the divan, but a bit to the right, as I faced it, was a low table, on which there were beverages and fruits, and tiny bowls and plates, filled with an assortment of viands. I felt momentarily giddy with the smell of the roasted meats, the breads and pastry.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 376


Roast tarsk, brought down but an Ahn before, in the dusk, skinned and gutted, was on the spit, and grease hissed, when it fell to the fire.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 594


Pertinax's Jane bore a large wooden plate of roast suls.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 410


I took the blanket handed me at the door to the mess. I dried my feet and legs, and shivered, and stepped inside. I could smell fresh Sa-Tarna bread, roast bosk. My body ached, I was weary. I was looking forward to food, and hot paga.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 133


I was holding a large platter of strips of roast bosk, fastened in threes with wooden skewers, one of the choices for the second ostrakon.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 155


I had breakfasted well, on larma, vulo eggs, fried sul, roast bosk, sa-tarna, and even black wine, the beans for which, I supposed, derived from the far slopes of the Thentis mountains, and may have been brought west at some risk.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 76


It was a far cry from the provenders I had been taught to prepare in the house, ranging from roasted, seasoned bosk and tarsk and fresh plate breads, with honeys and butters, to frosted pastries and decadent, creamed sauces which, in some cities, were outlawed by sumptuary laws.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111


I had dined well on roast vulo, rice, and chestnuts.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 485





 


Rolls
To The Top


I had little doubt that Ute would have saved me a roll from the feeding pan.
. . .
"I have saved a roll for you," said Ute.
"Thank you, Ute," I said.
"Eat it quickly," she said. "You have much work to do today."
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 348 - 349


I heard some men about a corner, running in step. I let the chain dangle and, hastily, took refuge in a side room, a pantry. I took a roll from a basket and fed on it.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 399


Then I saw the small, chained hand of one reach forth toward a piece of roll. She picked it up and thrust it in her mouth.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 98


Boots then helped himself to some more rolls and slices of fried tarsk.
. . .
"Good rolls," said Boots to Chino.
"Yes," agreed Chino, helping himself to another, as well.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 210


"Thank you," I said, and sat down with them, cross-legged. It was still rather early. Soon I was helping myself to a heaping serving of vulo eggs, tarsk strips and rolls.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 212


I slowly, carefully, piled a plate high with rolls, eggs and fried vulo strips.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 213


She wiped her plate with a crust of one of the rolls. She did not wish to leave a particle of food on that homely tin surface.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 220


"In the slave wagon," he said, "on the right, as you enter, there is a water bag, which is full, and a food pan, in which there are two rolls.
. . .
I then crawled to the food pan and took one of the rolls. It was stale, but suitable for a slave.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 433


The attendant, in passing her cell, threw a roll into the cell, which she ran to, seized up and, on her knees, devoured in haste.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 50


But the garment, too, makes it difficult, or impossible, to conceal a roll, a purloined larma, or such.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 19





 


Roots
To The Top


The principal ingredients of Sullage are the golden Sul, the starchy, golden-brown vine-borne fruit of the golden-leaved Sul plant; the curled, red, ovate leaves of the Tur-Pah, a tree parasite, cultivated in host orchards of Tur trees, and the salty, blue secondary roots of the Kes Shrub, a small, deeply rooted plant which grows best in sandy soil.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Pages 44 - 45


From these raids the Wagon Peoples obtain a miscellany of goods which they are willing to barter to the Turians, jewels, precious metals, spices, colored table salts, harnesses and saddles for the ponderous tharlarion, furs of small river animals, tools for the field, scholarly scrolls, inks and papers, root vegetables,
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 57


Ute taught me to find food where it would not have occurred to me to look for it. I relished the roots she taught me to dig for.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 236


Mostly I ate fruits and nuts, and some roots.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 247


The Sul is a tuberous root of the Sul plant; it is a Gorean staple.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 134


Many goods pass in and out of Schendi, as would be the case in any major port, such as precious metals, jewels, tapestries, rugs, silks, horn and horn products, medicines, sugars and salts, scrolls, papers, inks, lumber, stone, cloth, ointments, perfumes, dried fruit, some dried fish, many root vegetables,
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 115


"We send them into the villages, upon occasion, some of them," said the first lad, "to work, if there is a call for them, or to deliver roots and berries which they have gathered to the women.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 128


"Why did you come back?" I asked.
"I came to look for roots," she said, chewing.
"Did you find any?" I asked.
She looked at me quickly, narrowly. "No," she said.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 18


"Here," she said, embarrassed. She drew some roots, and two suls, from her robe. They had been freshly dug. Dirt still clung to them. She put them down on the stones, between us. I sat down cross-legged, and she knelt down, opposite me, knees together, in the common fashion of the Gorean free woman. The roots, the two suls, were between us. She rocked the child in her arms.

"I thought you could find no roots." I smiled.

"Some were left in the garden," she said. "I remembered them. I came back for them. There was very little left though. Others obviously had come before me. These things were missed. They are poor stuff. We used to use the produce of that garden for tarsk feed."

"They are fine roots," I said, "and splendid Suls."

"We even hunt for tarsk troughs," she said, wearily, "and dig in the cold dirt of the pens. The tarsk are gone, but sometimes a bit of feed remains, fallen between the cracks, or missed by the animals, having been trampled into the mud. There are many tricks we learn in these days."

"I do not want to take your food," I said.

"Would you shame me?" she asked.

"No," I said.

"Share my kettle," she said.

"Thank you," I said. I took one of the roots and broke off a bit of it in my hand. I rubbed the dirt from it. I bit into it. "Good," I said. I did not eat more, however. I would let her keep her food. I had done in this matter what would be sufficient. I had, in what I had done, acknowledged her as the mistress in her house; I had shown her honor; I had "shared her kettle."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 22 - 23


"In the trees," said Cabot, "we have a small camp, and there are edible leaves there, some gathered roots, and berries."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 339


"Come, Beast," said the Lady Bina to Grendel. "Bring me more berries, and leafage, roots, if well washed! I am hungry."
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 343


"I am hungry for meat, friend," said Cabot. "After the supplies brought from the war camp, I have had little but berries, and, near the womb tunnel, some roots dug out from under the snow.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 593


Indeed, in moments, most of the beasts of the herd, in their doltish fashion, had returned to their pursuits, as though nothing had happened, scratching for grubs and worms, digging here and there to uncover edible roots.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 513


It was there, visible locked, even when I might be up and about the camp, being summoned, fetching and carrying, cleaning, laundering, ironing, digging roots, picking berries, tidying, being about whatever duties might be given me.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 170


I was waiting, each day, hoping to be sent to the edge of the camp toward the wands, that I might search for roots, pick berries, or gather firewood.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 186


I found some small, tuberous roots which had been missed, or rejected. I did not know what they were, but from the texture of the root and its starchiness, I would have supposed some tiny variety of wild Sul.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 245


"Note the kelp, the bamboo shoots, the fish, the lotus roots, and mushrooms."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204





 


Sake
To The Top


I sat near Lord Nishida, and he had offered me a sip of a different fermented beverage, one I had once tasted on Earth, though not of so fine a quality. It was warm, in its small bowl. "It is sake," I was informed.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 409


"Stay a bit, Tarl Cabot, tarnsman," said Lord Nishida, and I sat down, cross-legged, across from him, across the small table, and watched him pour himself, and then me, a tiny cup of sake.

"Do you like it?" asked Lord Nishida.

"Yes," I said.

"What do you think of me?" asked Lord Nishida.

"I think you are a remarkable man," I said, "a gifted leader, highly intelligent, subtle, wise, and cunning."

"Do you trust me?" he asked.

"No," I said.

"Good," he said.

He lifted the small cup to his lips, and regarded me over the white, porcelain brim.

"Do you know why I brought you to the tent this evening?" he asked.

"I was not brought," I said. "I thought you in danger. I hurried hither, hoping to warn you, perhaps to save your life."

"No," he said. "You were brought."

"Lord Nishida is subtle," I said.

He sipped the sake, and then placed the cup on the lacquered table between us.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 422 - 423


"Finish your sake," suggested Lord Nishida.

I threw it down, which brought a slight tremor of surprise, and distaste, or, perhaps better, disappointment, to the fine features of the daimyo, for sake is not to be so drunk. Perhaps kal-da or paga, but not sake.

"You are a refined, civilized individual, one of taste," I said.

"Perhaps you do not realize the risks with which you bedeck your environs."

"Nor you yours," responded Lord Nishida, quietly.

"I see," I said.

"Sake is to be sipped," said Lord Nishida.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 425


"Tarl Cabot, tarnsman," said Lord Nishida.
"Yes?" I said.
"Sake," he said, "is to be sipped."
"I shall remember," I said.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 427


The Pani, I had discovered on the ship, were familiar with such devices, and, as I later learned, with ciphers and codes, as well. When the men chose to leave the castle, they were given marked shells, rather like ostraka. These could be exchanged for things in the villages, fish, rice, sake, a fermented drink made from rice,
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 404


One is not entitled to assume that a fair-skinned slave from abroard, one from a far different culture, is going to know what might be expected of her, the proper serving, for example, of sake, the appropriate temperature, and such.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 406


They removed the silken covers and we noted the hampers were heaped with fruits, vegetables, cakes of rice, smoked fish, layers of dried, salted meat, and stoppered vessels which I supposed might contain sake, and perhaps, considering the continental mercenaries in the camp, none of whom had been permitted, save myself, to attend these proceedings, paga and ka-la-na.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 55


"Fortunately," said Lord Temmu. "Would you care for a sip of sake?"

"Not really," I said.

But Sumomo had already drawn to the side where three small cups resided on a flat lacquered tray. These she filled from a small vessel. I watched her hands carefully. I noted, to my satisfaction, that she poured all three cups from the same vessel.

"You wished to see me?" I said to Lord Temmu.

"Yes," said Lord Temmu.

Sumomo politely, her head shyly down, held the tray first to Lord Temmu and then to Daichi. Each took one of the small cups. That left one cup on the tray.

"Tarl Cabot san," she said softly, holding the tray to me.

A slave, of course, would not speak the name of a free man, lest it be soiled on her lips. She might, of course, in discourse, refer to a free man, her master or others, if it were suitable to do so. For example, if she were asked her master's name, she would certainly volunteer this information, with suitable deference. Sumomo, of course, was not a slave, at least per se, but a contract woman.

I took the small cup.

Lord Temmu took a sip of sake first. Daichi, the reader of bones and shells, then sipped from the tiny cup.

"I am not thirsty," I said.

"Please," said Lord Temmu.

I recalled that all three cups had been filled from the same small vessel. Too, I had paid careful attention to the small, lovely hands of Sumomo. Also, I was in the castle of the holding. Also, there were two large Ashigaru, armed, behind me.

I sipped the sake.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Pages 123 - 124


But there are men who prefer ka-la-na and men who prefer paga, even men who prefer mead, or kal-da, even sake.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 173


"Sake," called Tajima to Saru, who hurried to bring him the second of his three small cups.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204





 


Salt
To The Top


The proprietor arrived with hot bread, honey, salt and, to my delight, a huge, hot roasted chunk of tarsk.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 79

Many are the objects for sale at the fair. I passed among wines and textiles and raw wool, silks, and brocades, copperware and glazed pottery, carpets and tapestries, lumber, furs, hides, salt,
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 12


at the final meal Mul-Fungus is pressed into a large, flat cake and sprinkled with a few grains of salt.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 109


At last, feeling that I perhaps owed something to Misk's acceptance of me in his chamber, I suggested a compromise at five, and, for an extra salt packet, six on alternate days. At last Misk threw in two extra salt packets a day and I agreed to six washings.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 112


I turned to the Attendant. "She is to have a double salt ration each evening," I told him.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 200


From these raids the Wagon Peoples obtain a miscellany of goods which they are willing to barter to the Turians, jewels, precious metals, spices, colored table salts,
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 57


Near him, in places of honor, at a long, low table, above the bowls of yellow and red salt, on each side, sat many of the high men of Turia, clad in their finest robes, their hair oiled, scented and combed for the banquet.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 253


It had been expected, I gathered, that I would sit at one of the two long side tables, and perhaps even below the bowls of red and yellow salt which divided these tables.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 86


His gruel had been salted to the point of being inedible; he flared disgustedly down at the wet mash of porridge and salt.
"Kajuralia, Master," said Elizabeth Cardwell to Ho-Tu,
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 237


There was the odor of food in the kitchen, and of spilled drink. There were several yards of sausages hung on hooks; canisters of flour, sugars and salts; many smaller containers of spices and condiments.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 271


Accordingly I did not carry, in these first voyages, any abundance of precious metals or jewels; nor did I carry rugs or tapestries, or medicines, or silks or ointments, or perfumes or prize slaves, or spices or canisters of colored table salts.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 138


Other studies, the results of which would be kept similarly private to the council, dealt with the city defenses, and her stores of wood, grain, salt, stone and tharlarion oil.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 159


I called the lookout down from the basket, that I might climb to his place. In the basket I wrapped the admiral's cloak about me, began to chew on a piece of tarsk meat, as much against the cold as the hunger, and took out the glass of the builders.
I examined the state of the battle.
Tarsk meat tends to be salty. There is usually a water gourd kept at the masthead, for the lookout.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 265


Laura is a small trading city, a river port, whose buildings are largely of wood, consisting mostly it seems of warehouses and taverns. It is a clearing house for many goods, wood, salt, fish, stone, fur and slaves.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 59


On these barges, moving upriver, I could see many crates and boxes, which would contain such goods, rough goods, as metal, and tools and cloth. Moving downstream I could see other barges, moving the goods of the interior downriver, such objects as planking, barrels of fish, barrels of salt, loads of stone, and bales of fur.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 81


Too, from Laura, much in evidence, were great barrels of salt, stacks of lumber, and sleds of stones, on wooden runners, from the quarries to her east.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 44


Too, I cut each of them a piece of the dried, salted meat taken from the abandoned camp of the men of Tyros and the girls of Hura.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 214


Pudding had come to him, and knelt before him, holding a plate of Sa-Tarna loaves. The daughter of Gurt, the Administrator of Kassau, was being taught to bake. She watched fearfully as the Forkbeard bit into one. "It needs more salt," he had said to her. She shuddered.
. . .
"It is not bad bread," said Ivar Forkbeard to me, when she had disappeared from sight. He broke me a piece. We finished it. It was really quite good, but, as the Forkbeard ha said, it could have used a dash more salt.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 103


Salt, in its bowls on the tables, divided men into rankings. Those sitting above the salt were accorded greater prestige than those sitting below it. If one sat between the salt and the high seat, one sat "above" the salt; if one sat between the salt and the entrance to the hall, one sat "below" the salt. At the high-seat table, that at which the high seat sat, all counted as being "above the salt." Similarly, at the tables parallel to the high-seat table, smaller tables flanking the long fire on both sides, the tables nearest the high seat counted as being above the salt, those farthest away being below the salt.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Pages 186 - 187


Salt, incidentally, is obtained by the men of Torvaldsland, most commonly, from sea water or from the burning of seaweed. It is also, however, a trade commodity, and is sometimes taken in raids. The red and yellow salts of the south, some of which I saw on the tables, are not domestic to Torvaldsland.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 187


Hilda, bent over, a heavy sack of salt over her shoulders, staggered up the gangplank.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 288


The red salt of Kasra, so called from its port of embarkation, was famed on Gor. It was brought from secret pits and mines, actually, deep in the interior, bound in heavy cylinders on the backs of pack kaiila. Each cylinder, roped to others, weighed in the neighborhood of ten stone, or some forty pounds, a Gorean "Weight." A strong kaiila could carry sixteen such cylinders, but the normal load was ten.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 20


Like most water in the Tahari the water of Tor was slightly salty and unclear.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 57


kaiila milk, which is used, like verr milk, by the peoples of the Tahari, is reddish, and has a strong, salty taste; it contains much ferrous sulfate;
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 71


Whereas salt may be obtained from sea water and by burning seaweed, as is sometimes done in Torvaldsland, and there are various districts on Gor where salt, solid or in solution, may be obtained, by far the most extensive and richest of known Gor's salt deposits are to be found concentrated in the Tahari. Tahari salt accounts, in its varieties, I would suspect, for some twenty percent of the salt and salt-related products, such as medicines and antiseptics, preservatives, cleansers, bleaches, bottle glass, which contains soda ash, taken from salt, and tanning chemicals, used on known Gor. Salt is a trading commodity par excellence. There are areas on Gor where salt serves as a currency, being weighed and exchanged much as precious metals.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 208


The men are fed twice, once in the morning, once at night, when the hood is opened, and thrust up some inches to permit eating. Food is thrust in their mouths. It was generally dried fruit, crackers and a bit of salt, to compensate for the salt loss during the day's march, consequent on perspiration.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 226


Most salt at Klima is white, but certain of the mines deliver red salt, red from ferrous oxide in its composition, which is called the Red Salt of Kasra, after its port of embarkation, at the juncture of the Upper and Lower Fayeen.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 238


The same underground seepage which, in places, fills the brine pits, in other places, passing through salt-free strata, provides Klima with its fresh water. It has a salty taste like much of the water of the Tahari but it is completely drinkable, not having been filtered through the salt accumulations. It contains only the salt normal in Tahari drinking water. The salt in the normal Tahari fresh water, incidentally, is not without its value, for, when drunk, it helps to some extent, though it is not in itself sufficient, to prevent salt loss in animals and men through sweating.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 239 - 240


There are also the molding sheds where the salt is pressed into the large cylinders, such that they may be roped together and eventually be laden on pack kaiila. The salt is divided into nine qualities. Each cylinder is marked with its quality, the name of its district, and the sign of that district's salt master.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 240


A man handed me a bag of food. It contained dried fruit, biscuits, salt.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 267


I had discovered that it was well stocked with supplies. It was in the nature of a cache camp, which might be returned to now and again. In a cave in the adjoining cliff there were several boxes. Several were locked, but others were open. There were flasks of wine there, and bottles of the brew called paga; stores of salt,
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 50


With our fingers and, like cats, with our tongues, we finished the gruel. It was plain. It was not sugared or salted. It was slave gruel.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 66


Drawers in the side of the wagon contained, too, mysteries of goods, such as threads, cloths, scissors, thimbles, buttons and patches, brushes and combs, sugars, herbs, spices, packets of salt, and philters of medicine.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 207 - 208


I knew he would return, to finish the feeding, with another draft of water, a spoon of salt and a slice of the bitter tospit.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 320


Many goods pass in and out of Schendi, as would be the case in any major port, such as precious metals, jewels, tapestries, rugs, silks, horn and horn products, medicines, sugars and salts,
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 115


Tied in the canoe itself was a long, cylindrical basket of strips of salted, dried fish.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 268


Generally food is preserved by being dried or salted.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 295


Much salt passes through Kasra.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 305


I had once been in Kasra. It is a river port on the Lower Fayeen. It is important in the Tahari salt trade.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 30


The sul is a large, thick-skinned, starchy, yellow-fleshed root vegetable. It is very common on this world. There are a thousand ways in which it is prepared. It is fed even to slaves. I had had some at the house, narrow, cooked slices smeared with butter, sprinkled with salt, fed to me by hand.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 80


Coins, or letters of credit, might be concealed about a wagon, but it is not easy to conceal quantities of flour, salt, jerky, paga and such,
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Pages 113 - 114


"The porridge water should be salted," I said.
"Yes, Master," she said, and crawled to the front of the tent.
"Salt it lightly," I said. She was learning to serve.
"Yes, Master," she said.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 152


I watched Phoebe pour some meal into the boiling, salted water.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 154


I fingered some of the meal into my mouth. It was in a glutinous, semisolid glob. It was neither sugared nor salted.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 209


I cut another piece.
I offered it to Plenius, and he took it. Then the other men, too, began to crowd about. Soon there was little left of the tharlarion but the bones and hide.
"It could have used salt," said a fellow.
"You are now less hungry," I observed.
"Yes," he said.
"You have salt, do you not?" I asked.
"Yes," he said, "but we had nothing to put it on. Then we had something to put it on, and we did not think of it."
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 306


Shortly thereafter two fellows passed, bearing a pole between them, from which hung gutted, salted harbor eels.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 81


Slave gruel is not that different from some pottages I had known on my former world. As slave feed, however, it is commonly served plain and bland, served without spices, sugars, salts, or other flavors.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 295


One would prefer Tur-Pah, certainly on a cool night, boiled in Sullage, or in some stew or even fried, salted, and honeyed, but, too, it is often, perhaps most often, eaten raw.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 441


They removed the silken covers and we noted the hampers were heaped with fruits, vegetables, cakes of rice, smoked fish, layers of dried, salted meat, and stoppered vessels which I supposed might contain sake, and perhaps, considering the continental mercenaries in the camp, none of whom had been permitted, save myself, to attend these proceedings, paga and ka-la-na.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 55


"You two," said the first girl, "go to the salt market, at the east gate, to the vendor, Porus, and return with a stone of salt."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 236


The salt in the local markets is obtained from the sea. Large pans are set forth with a thin film of sea water, which, as it evaporates, leaves the salt behind, which is then scraped together, and sent to the markets of the city.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 239


Whereas some food had been brought from Ar in the wagon, some bread, and cold, prepared dishes, the latter for the free, more food had been bought from the shops in the caravanserai, some cubed, salted bosk, and some kes, tur-pah, and suls. In one of the two vessels suspended over the fire, Paula had prepared sullage, a sort of sul soup, or, in this case, given the thickness of the mix, a sul stew, and, in the other, had boiled the bosk cubes, heating and softening them. She had first, as is usually done, washed and scrubbed the cubes in fresh water, which is done to reduce the salt content and make the cubes more palatable.
"Open your mouth," said my master.
I obeyed, and he, from the pan in which the cubes now resided, placed one of the small cubes of bosk in my mouth. I could still taste the salt.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 616





 


Sa-Tassna
To The Top


Interestingly enough, the word for meat is Sa-Tassna, which means Life-Mother. Incidentally, when one speaks of food in general, one always speaks of Sa-Tassna.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Pages 43 - 44


The expression is related to Sa-Tassna, the expression for meat, or for food in general, which means Life-Mother.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Pages 74 - 75





 


Sauces
To The Top


I saw a man buy a roll of meat, wrapped about a sauce.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 287


I knelt before the table on the second balcony, placing the tray on the floor and quickly, deferentially, placing its contents on the table, the assorted meats and cheese, the sauces and fruits, and wines and nuts.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 330


I bought a slice of rolled meat, filled with sauce, in a waxed paper, from a vendor.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 78


"It is a small dish," said the Lady Florence, "the white meat of roast vulos, prepared in a sauce of spiced Sa-Tarna and Ta wine."
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 286


"Meat, Master?" asked a girl, nude, who knelt now beside me. She offered a tray on which small cubes of roasted bosk, on tiny sticks, steamed. I took several, dipping them by the sticks, in a sauce, carried on the same tray. I returned the tiny sticks to the tray and looked at the girl.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 192


"Another bit of larma, Master?" asked the slave, kneeling behind me and to my left. I turned and, from where I sat cross-legged behind the low table, removed a small, crisp disk of fried larma, with a browned-honey sauce, from the silver tray.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 231


Tutina, then, placed the tray on the table. On the tray, tastefully arranged, with napkins, was a plate of small pastries, a saucer and cup, some sugars and creams, some spoons, and a small pot of coffee.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 32


And, as time went on, she became aware that these tasks were not as menial and simple as she had conjectured, but that genuine skill was needed, and attention, to turn out a delectable sauce, to make small, fine stitches, to press a tunic with fire-heated irons so well that one would not feel the switches of the instructrices, and so on.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Pages 649 - 650


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


Fruits and sauces in hand I was ascending the stairs to the domicile.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 632


It was a far cry from the provenders I had been taught to prepare in the house, ranging from roasted, seasoned bosk and tarsk and fresh plate breads, with honeys and butters, to frosted pastries and decadent, creamed sauces which, in some cities, were outlawed by sumptuary laws.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Sausage
To The Top


There was the odor of food in the kitchen, and of spilled drink. There were several yards of sausages hung on hooks; canisters of flour, sugars and salts; many smaller containers of spices and condiments.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 271


Another had strings of sausage hung about his neck and shoulders.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 36


"What are they stuffed with?" I asked Hurtha.
"Sausage," he said.
"Tarsk?" I asked.
"Of course," he said.
"My favorite," I said. "I shall have one."
"Alas," said Hurtha. "They are all gone."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 83


The other helper, too, was distributing food, sausages and bread.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 25


"Thank you," I said to the other helper, taking a sausage from the plate.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 26


There were, of course, the pans, pots, utensils, lamps, pails, and such, which, on shelves and dangling from poles, she supposed might have suggested the name of the market, but there were also stalls, as well, specializing in many other forms of goods, for example, stalls of fruits and vegetables, and produce of various sorts, and sausages and dried meats,
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 230


Too, it is near the tenth Ahn. The bar will soon ring. Men will be about the street. I can smell the cook shops, fresh bread, and sausages.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 251





 


Sea Sleen
To The Top


"I think not," said Samos. "Their winter stores of food, from the ice hunting, will last them for a time. Then they must hunt elsewhere. Perhaps some can live by fishing until the fall, and the return of the black sea sleen."
The red hunters lived as nomads, dependent on the migrations of various types of animals, in particular the northern tabuk and four varieties of sea sleen.
. . .
The four main types of sea sleen found in the polar seas are the black sleen, the brown sleen, the tusked sleen and the flat-nosed sleen.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Pages 36 & 38


"Hello, Sleen!" I called.
"Good," said Imnak. "That is a start."
"How do you do this?" I asked.
"Listen," said Imnak. He spoke out, over the icy waters. "Tal," said he, "my lovely brothers, my dangerous brethren. How beautiful and strong you are. How fast you swim. And your meat is so good in soups.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 282





 


Sea Sleen Blood
To The Top


He took his kayak to the side of the beast. With wooden plugs he began to stop up the wounds. He did not wish to lose what blood might be left in the animal. Frozen blood is nutritious.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 287





 


Seasonings
To The Top


There are various ways in which pemmican may be prepared, depending primarily on what one adds into the mixture, in the way of herbs, seasonings and fruit.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 46


The repast had been far more than boiled meat. It had been, in effect, a rich stew, crowded with vegetables and seasonings.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 147


"Perhaps in your haste you have forgotten to season that," I said. "I prefer anyway to season my own porridge. See that you do not dare to present the porridge without the seasonings."
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 72


Then the porridge, with the seasonings and condiments, was on the table.
. . .
I tasted the porridge. It had not yet been seasoned. Trying it, with one spoonful or another, from one vial or pot, or another, I seasoned it to my taste. I would later, now and then, here or there, in one place or another, mix in condiments. By such devices one obtains variety, or its deceptive surrogate, even in a substance seemingly so initially unpromising as inn porridge.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 73


It was a far cry from the provenders I had been taught to prepare in the house, ranging from roasted, seasoned bosk and tarsk and fresh plate breads, with honeys and butters, to frosted pastries and decadent, creamed sauces which, in some cities, were outlawed by sumptuary laws.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208


I ladled the grain and vulo soup, seasoned with brown, ground tur-pah, carefully into the bowl.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 157


There were only the two soups, four vegetables, and two meats, roast Vosk gull and seasoned, boiled verr followed by fruit and nuts.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 160





 


Sesame Seeds
To The Top


The only relief in their existence comes once a year, on the birthday of the Tatrix, when they are served a small cake, made with honey and sesame seeds, and a small pot of poor Kal-da.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 150





 


Shark
To The Top


The red hunters lived as nomads, dependent on the migrations of various types of animals, in particular the northern tabuk and four varieties of sea sleen. Their fishing and hunting were seasonal, and depended on the animals. Sometimes they managed to secure the northern shark, sometimes even the toothed Hunjer whale or the less common Karl whale, which was a four-fluked, baleen whale.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 36


"We starve," he said.
"Then you know not where to look for food," I said.
"There are the sharks, the tharlarion," he said.
"Such are sources of nourishment," I said.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 280


The shark lay in the camp, among us, the rope by which it had been dragged to this location still on its tail. It no longer moved. Its gills no longer pulsated.
. . .
A fellow nearby was sharpening a knife on a whetstone. It was his turn, as I recalled, to cut the meat.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 328


One might suppose that food might be obtained from the sea itself but that source cannot be relied on. Most edible fish frequent banks, shallow banks, which are commonly near shores, where they are plentiful, not the open sea, where there is little for them to feed on. The nine-gilled Gorean shark will sometimes trail a ship, for garbage, but that is not a source to be relied on either.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 535


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Sherbet
To The Top


shallow silver bowls of white and yellow sherbet
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 220





 


Shoots
To The Top


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


He then addressed the other diners. "Note the kelp, the bamboo shoots, the fish, the lotus roots, and mushrooms."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204





 


Slave Bread
To The Top


Crusts of bread did I throw to the boards before her. It was slave bread, rough and coarse-grained.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 48





 


Slave Porridge
To The Top


"Girls in training," said Ho-Tu, "partake of the finest of slave porridges. They are given mats to sleep on, and later in their training, furs. They are seldom chained. Sometimes they are even permitted, under guard, to leave the house, that they may be stimulated and pleased by the sights of Ar."

"Do you hear that, Little Vella?" I asked.

"Yes, Master," said Elizabeth, not lifting her head.

"Further," said Ho-Tu, "after the first few weeks of training, if sufficient progress is made, they will be permitted foods other than slave porridges."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 119


One of the smiths from below was summoned with a bowl of slave porridge, which he mixed half with water, and stirred well, so that it could be drunk. There are various porridges given to slaves and they differ. The porridges in the iron pens, however, are as ugly and tasteless a gruel, and deliberately so, as might be imagined.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 126


By the time I returned to the House of Cernus Elizabeth would have finished her slave porridge and be in the compartment, and I would hear about her day, and she would hear about mine, or most of it.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 148





 


Smoked Fish
To The Top


They removed the silken covers and we noted the hampers were heaped with fruits, vegetables, cakes of rice, smoked fish, layers of dried, salted meat, and stoppered vessels which I supposed might contain sake, and perhaps, considering the continental mercenaries in the camp, none of whom had been permitted, save myself, to attend these proceedings, paga and ka-la-na.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 55





 


Smoked Parsit
To The Top


Trade to the south, of course is largely in furs acquired from Torvaldsland, and in barrels of smoked, dried parsit fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 28





 


Snails
To The Top


Once the Forkbeard went to her and taught her to check the scoop, with her left hand, for snails, that they not be thrown overboard. Returning to me he held one of the snails, whose shell he crushed between his fingers, and sucked out the animal, chewing and swallowing it. He then threw the shell fragments overboard.

"They are edible," he said. "And we use them for fish bait."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 62


In another place, that night, we found a narrow channel of baked mud, the dried bed of a tiny, vanished stream, of the sort which in the winter, should it rain, carries water for a few days. We followed this to a shallow, dried pool. Digging here we found dormant snails. In the moonlight we cracked the shells, sucking out the fluid. It stank. Only at first did I vomit.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 280





 


Snake
To The Top


From the mouth of one dangled a small snake.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 513





 


Song Fish - Songfish
To The Top


"Now this," Saphrar the merchant was telling me, "is the braised liver of the blue, four-spined Cosian wingfish."

This fish is a tiny, delicate fish, blue, about the size of a tarn disk when curled in one's hand; it has three or four slender spines in its dorsal fin, which are poisonous; it is capable of hurling itself from the water and, for brief distances, on its stiff pectoral fins, gliding through the air, usually to evade the smaller sea-tharlarions, which seem to be immune to the poison of the spines. This fish is also sometimes referred to as the songfish because, as a portion of its courtship rituals, the males and females thrust their heads from the water and utter a sort of whistling sound.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 84 - 85


I tried the liver of the wingfish. Then another swig of Paga.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 86


I heard the mating whistles of the tiny, lovely Cosian wingfish. This is a small, delicate fish; it has three or four slender spines in its dorsal fin, which are poisonous. It is called the wingfish because it can, on its stiff pectoral fins, for short distances, glide through the air, usually in an attempt to flee small sea tharlarion, who are immune to the poison of the spines. It is also called a songfish, because, in their courtship rituals, males and females thrust their heads from the water, uttering a kind of whistle. Their livers are regarded as a delicacy.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 139


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Soup
To The Top


First she boiled and simmered a kettle of Sullage, a common Gorean soup consisting of three standard ingredients and, as it is said, whatever else may be found, saving only the rocks of the field. The principal ingredients of Sullage are the golden Sul, the starchy, golden-brown vine-borne fruit of the golden-leaved Sul plant; the curled, red, ovate leaves of the Tur-Pah, a tree parasite, cultivated in host orchards of Tur trees, and the salty, blue secondary roots of the Kes Shrub, a small, deeply rooted plant which grows best in sandy soil.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Pages 44 - 45


the leaves of the Tur-Pah incidentally are edible and figure in certain Gorean dishes, such as sullage, a kind of soup;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 217


Now, chained, kneeling in a circle, we passed about, one to the other, a bowl of hot soup; then each of us was given a sixth of a round yellow loaf of bread, which we ate with our hands; then, before each of us, on the grass, the guards threw a large piece of cooked meat.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 65


"Soup! Soup!" called a man.

"Soup!" I called, raising my hand. I purchased from him, for a copper tarsk, a bowl of soup, thick with shreds of hot bosk and porous chunks of boiled sul.

"Whom do you favor in the great match?" I asked.

"Scormus of Ar," said he.
I nodded. I handed him back the soup bowl.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 51


By another platform a slaver's man was moving along the platform. He carried a large, handled copper tureen filled with a watery soup. The slaver's beauties, chained together by the neck, knelt at the edge of the platform. Each dipped her cupped hands twice into the tureen, and lifted them, drinking and feeding, to her mouth. They then licked and sucked their fingers and wiped their hands on their bodies.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 54


"Hello, Sleen!" I called.

"Good," said Imnak. "That is a start."

"How do you do this?" I asked.

"Listen," said Imnak. He spoke out, over the icy waters. "Tal," said he, "my lovely brothers, my dangerous brethren. How beautiful and strong you are. How fast you swim. And your meat is so good in soups.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 282


"I have water," I said, "but no broth, or soup."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 18


After a time Mirus indicated that Ellen might serve the soup, which, she began to do, ladling it from a large tureen on a serving cart, filling the bowls one by one, and placing them on the table, in the order prescribed.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 94


"Stir the soup," snapped the other girl.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 44


"The soup is hot," said Constantina. "Surely you can tell that, stupid slave. Hurry, wrap the tabuk strips on their skewers, and put them to the fire. Are the suls and turpah ready?"
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 47


"I think the tabuk strips, the suls and turpah, the soup, all, must be ready," said Pertinax. "Let us have supper."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 53


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


I ladled the grain and vulo soup, seasoned with brown, ground tur-pah, carefully into the bowl.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 157


There were only the two soups, four vegetables, and two meats, roast Vosk gull and seasoned, boiled verr followed by fruit and nuts.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 160


Soup, usually thick, sometimes with suls, as in sullage, but commonly comprised of other vegetables and noodles, would be ladled into wooden bowls.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 251


Whereas some food had been brought from Ar in the wagon, some bread, and cold, prepared dishes, the latter for the free, more food had been bought from the shops in the caravanserai, some cubed, salted bosk, and some kes, tur-pah, and suls. In one of the two vessels suspended over the fire, Paula had prepared sullage, a sort of sul soup, or, in this case, given the thickness of the mix, a sul stew, and, in the other, had boiled the bosk cubes, heating and softening them. She had first, as is usually done, washed and scrubbed the cubes in fresh water, which is done to reduce the salt content and make the cubes more palatable.
"Open your mouth," said my master.
I obeyed, and he, from the pan in which the cubes now resided, placed one of the small cubes of bosk in my mouth. I could still taste the salt.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 616





 


Spice
To The Top


Kal-da is a hot drink, almost scalding, made of diluted Ka-la-na wine, mixed with citrus juices and stinging spices.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 76


Behind the counter the thin, bald-headed proprietor, his forehead glistening, his slick black apron stained with spices, juices and wine, busily worked his long mixing paddle in a vast pot of bubbling Kal-da.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 223


From these raids the Wagon Peoples obtain a miscellany of goods which they are willing to barter to the Turians, jewels, precious metals, spices, colored table salts,
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 57


"It is the spiced brain of the Torian vulo," Saphrar was explaining.
. . .
I shot the spiced vulo brain into my mouth on the tip of a golden eating prong, a utensil, as far as I knew, unique to Turia. I took a large swallow of fierce Paga, washing it down as rapidly as possible.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 83


"It was an amusement on my part," smiled Saphrar, "to speak your name at that time to see what you would do to give you something, so to speak, to stir in your wine."

It was a Turian saying. They used wines in which, as a matter of fact, things could be and were, upon occasion, stirred - mostly spices and sugars.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 198


Before them had been placed large golden dishes heaped with delicacies prepared by the kitchens of the Ubar, tall precious goblets filled with Turian wines, the small bowls of spices and sugars with their stirring spoons at hand.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 253


Then free women, veiled and in Robes of Concealment, each carrying a jar or canister, approached the structure. Even from where Kuurus waited he could smell the perfumed oils, the unguents and spices, which the women, climbing and moving about the pyramid slowly, as though on stairs, sprinkled about or poured over the wood.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Pages 1 - 2


There was the odor of food in the kitchen, and of spilled drink. There were several yards of sausages hung on hooks; canisters of flour, sugars and salts; many smaller containers of spices and condiments.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 271


Accordingly I did not carry, in these first voyages, any abundance of precious metals or jewels; nor did I carry rugs or tapestries, or medicines, or silks or ointments, or perfumes or prize slaves, or spices or canisters of colored table salts.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 138


They had been beautiful, in silver throat coffle, their wrists bound behind their backs in golden slave bracelets, kneeling as pleasure slaves among the jewels, the piled gold, and the heaps of silk and kegs of spices.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 232


We passed some fortified warehouses, in which space is available to merchants. In such places there would be gems, and gold, silks, and wines and perfumes, jewelries and spices, richer goods not to be left exposed on the docks.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 44


I smelled the spices and sweat of Tor.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 36


To the oases caravans bring various goods, for example, rep-cloth, embroidered cloths, silks, rugs, silver, gold, jewelries, mirrors, kailiauk tusk, perfumes, hides, skins, feathers, precious woods, tools, needles, worked leather goods, salt, nuts and spices,
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


I brushed away two sellers of apricots and spices.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 45


Some of the peppers and spices, relished even by children in the Tahari districts, were sufficient to convince an average good fellow of Thentis or Ar that the roof of his mouth and his tongue were being torn out of his head.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 46


"You certify to me," said I to the slave master, "that this man is neither clumsy nor stupid, nor drunk, nor an instructor in combat intent upon increasing the confidence of his pupils."

"It is so certified," he smiled. "He is used in cleaning the pens. He is a drover who falsified the quality-markings on spice crates."
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 79


Drawers in the side of the wagon contained, too, mysteries of goods, such as threads, cloths, scissors, thimbles, buttons and patches, brushes and combs, sugars, herbs, spices, packets of salt, and philters of medicine.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 207 - 208


"Give me meat," he said.
I lifted the platter to him and he thrust the eating prong into a slab of meat, hot with Turian spices.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 265


The men in the room responded eagerly. "Dina!" called the fellow to whom I had earlier served the spiced hot meat.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 270


I could smell spices in a bale near me.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 343


"Do you smell it?" asked Ulafi.
"Yes," I said. "It is cinnamon and cloves, is it not?"
"Yes," said Ulafi, "and other spices, as well."
. . .
"How far are we out of Schendi?" I asked.
"Fifty pasangs," said Ulafi. We could not yet see land.
The two girls, on their hands and knees on the deck, linked together by a gleaming neck chain, some five feet in length, attached to two steel work collars, these fitted over their regular collars, looked up. They, too, could smell the spices, even this far from land.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 98


I drew a deep breath, relishing the loveliness of the smell of the spices, now stronger than before.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 99


Most in evidence were spice kegs and hide bales, but much else, too, could be seen, cargos in the warehouses and on the wharves, some waiting, some being actively carried about, being embarked or disembarked.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Pages 114 - 115


Schendi's most significant exports are doubtless spice and hides, with kailiauk horn and horn products also being of great importance.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 115


"It is a small dish," said the Lady Florence, "the white meat of roast vulos, prepared in a sauce of spiced Sa-Tarna and Ta wine."
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 286


The girls, carrying their trays, knelt before the table. "Desserts, Masters," announced the girl in bluish gauze. Then, rising, they began to serve, one on each side. On one tray were assorted pastries; on the other was a variety of small, spiced custards.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 239


"The dancers were lovely," said Glyco, pausing, a spoon lifted in the air over a small yellow, spiced custard.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 240


"Did Lady Sheila enjoy her spiced vulo this evening?" he asked.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 177


"Yes, Mistress," I said. I took the vessel of black wine, removing it from its warmer, and put it on its tray, that already bearing the tiny cups, the creams and sugars, the spices, the napkins and spoons.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Pages 405 - 406


"Try a spiced verr cube," he suggested.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 84


"Family, and caste?" he inquired.
"Daughter of the matron Aglaia, Lady of Torcadino," she said, "of the Myrtos lineage, she high in the trade of spices, Confirmation Treasurer of the Spice Council of Torcadino, she of the Merchants."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 135


In the north generally, mead, a drink made with fermented honey, and water, and often spices and such, tends to be favored over paga.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 16


And how would these goods, these loots, of precious metal, of soft flesh, of unusual fabrics, of rare spices, be transported whence these intruders derived?
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 478 - 479


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


Alcinoë, as she was Gorean, had the honor of bringing forth the vessel and cups, and my slave, as she was a barbarian, and thus subordinate, unless it was otherwise specified, brought forth the small pitcher of cream, the tiny spoons, and the small, flat bowls of sugars and spices. Later, each slave brought forth, as well, a tray of assorted cakes and pastries.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 579


As slave feed, however, it is commonly served plain and bland, served without spices, sugars, salts, or other flavors.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 295





 


Spiced Custard
To The Top


The girls, carrying their trays, knelt before the table. "Desserts, Masters," announced the girl in bluish gauze. Then, rising, they began to serve, one on each side. On one tray were assorted pastries; on the other was a variety of small, spiced custards.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 239


"The dancers were lovely," said Glyco, pausing, a spoon lifted in the air over a small yellow, spiced custard.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 240





 


Spiced Meat
To The Top


"Give me meat," he said.
I lifted the platter to him and he thrust the eating prong into a slab of meat, hot with Turian spices.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 265


The men in the room responded eagerly. "Dina!" called the fellow to whom I had earlier served the spiced hot meat.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 270





 


Spiced Verr
To The Top


"Try a spiced verr cube," he suggested.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 84





 


Spiced Vulo
To The Top


"Did Lady Sheila enjoy her spiced vulo this evening?" he asked.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 177





 


Spiced Vulo Brain
To The Top


"It is the spiced brain of the Torian vulo," Saphrar was explaining.
. . .
I shot the spiced vulo brain into my mouth on the tip of a golden eating prong, a utensil, as far as I knew, unique to Turia. I took a large swallow of fierce Paga, washing it down as rapidly as possible.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 83





 


Spikenard
To The Top


There is little market in simple Laura for the more exquisite goods of Gor. Seldom will one find there Torian rolls of gold wire, interlocking cubes of silver from Tharna, rubies carved into tiny, burning panthers from Schendi, nutmegs and cloves, spikenard and peppers from the lands east of Bazi, the floral brocades, the perfumes of Tyros, the dark wines, the gorgeous, diaphanous silks of glorious Ar.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 86





 


Squash
To The Top


They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 234





 


Squid
To The Top


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208





 


Stew
To The Top


I did not care particularly for the wooden bowls of stew and bread we commonly had at the public pens, but I was hungry and ready to eat even such, and with enthusiasm.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 163


We knelt in a circle, eating from the wooden bowls of bread and stew.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 167


I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48


Too, she taught her skills useful to a Tahari female, the making of ropes from kaiila hair, the cutting and plaiting of reins, the weaving of cloth and mats, the decoration and beading of leather goods, the use of the mortar and pestle, the use of the gram quern, the preparation and spicing of stews, the cleaning of verr and, primarily when we camped near watering holes in the vicinity of nomads, the milking of verr and kaiila.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 72 - 73


"You are worked hard here?" I asked.
"Oh, yes!" she laughed. "From morning to dark I am worked. I must gather brush and kaiila dung and make fires; I must cook the stews and porridges,
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 139


On the dais, with him, were several men, low tables of food, fruit, stews, tidbits of roast verr, assorted breads.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 212


"Can you make a good sleen stew?" he asked.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 427


There was much boiled meat and stew.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 437


The repast had been far more than boiled meat. It had been, in effect, a rich stew, crowded with vegetables and seasonings.
. . .
"There were many vegetables in the stew," I said to Cuwignaka,
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 147


Lady Yanina, kneeling before a pan of water, under the supervision of Rowena, who was tending the fire, was washing and scraping garden vegetables, mostly onions, turnips and suls. These would later be used in a stew.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 248


Only one fellow was within, and he was crouching near a small fire, in a hearth, at one end of the hut, tending a pot of stew, away from the door. The smell of this simple concoction was almost intoxicating to me.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 372


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


One would prefer Tur-Pah, certainly on a cool night, boiled in Sullage, or in some stew or even fried, salted, and honeyed, but, too, it is often, perhaps most often, eaten raw. It is the basic ingredient in most Gorean salads.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 441


"We have eleven varieties of rice here," said the shogun, "variously prepared, in stews, pastes, and cakes, and variously seasoned, with a dozen sauces and herbs. Too, consider the gifts of the sea and shore, from four of my fishing villages, clams, oysters, grunt, bag fish, song fish, shark, eels, octopus, wing fish, parsit, squid."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 208


Whereas some food had been brought from Ar in the wagon, some bread, and cold, prepared dishes, the latter for the free, more food had been bought from the shops in the caravanserai, some cubed, salted bosk, and some kes, tur-pah, and suls. In one of the two vessels suspended over the fire, Paula had prepared sullage, a sort of sul soup, or, in this case, given the thickness of the mix, a sul stew, and, in the other, had boiled the bosk cubes, heating and softening them. She had first, as is usually done, washed and scrubbed the cubes in fresh water, which is done to reduce the salt content and make the cubes more palatable.
"Open your mouth," said my master.
I obeyed, and he, from the pan in which the cubes now resided, placed one of the small cubes of bosk in my mouth. I could still taste the salt.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 616





 


Sugar
To The Top


Before them had been placed large golden dishes heaped with delicacies prepared by the kitchens of the Ubar, tall precious goblets filled with Turian wines, the small bowls of spices and sugars with their stirring spoons at hand.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 253


There was a brass ladle that Aphris and Elizabeth had used in cooking and a tin box of yellow Turian sugar, dented in now and its contents scattered;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 267


There was the odor of food in the kitchen, and of spilled drink. There were several yards of sausages hung on hooks; canisters of flour, sugars and salts; many smaller containers of spices and condiments.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 271


Tea is extremely important to the nomads. It is served hot and heavily sugared. It gives them strength then, in virtue of the sugar, and cools them, by making them sweat, as well as stimulating them.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 38


In the cafes I had feasted well. I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 47 - 48


She carried a tray, on which were various spoons and sugars. She knelt, placing her tray on the table. With a tiny spoon, its tip no more than a tenth of a hort in diameter, she placed four measures of white sugar, and six of yellow, in the cup; with two stirring spoons, one for the white sugar, another for the yellow, she stirred the beverage after each measure.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 89


The other girl, the white-skinned, red-haired girl, also in vest, chalwar and veil, and bangles and collar, lifted her tray of spoons and sugars. But I turned away. She was not summoned. The girls, white-skinned, were a matched set of slaves, one for the black wine, one for its sugars.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 105


Goreans seldom have cavities. I am not certain what the reasons for this are. In part it is doubtless a matter of a plainer, simpler diet, containing less sugar;
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 27


With our fingers and, like cats, with our tongues, we finished the gruel. It was plain. It was not sugared or salted. It was slave gruel.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 66


Drawers in the side of the wagon contained, too, mysteries of goods, such as threads, cloths, scissors, thimbles, buttons and patches, brushes and combs, sugars, herbs, spices, packets of salt, and philters of medicine.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 207 - 208


He sat, cross-legged, behind the low table. On it were hot bread, yellow sugars, slices of roast bosk, the scrambled eggs of vulos, pastries with creams and custards.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 20


The sled was heavily laden, but with little gold. More significant to Imnak had been sugars and Bazi tea, and furs and tools.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 176


The southern sugars are also popular. I had originally supposed this was because of their sweetness, there being few sweet items, save some berries, in the north. I now began to suspect that the calories of the sugars also played their role in their popularity. The red hunters think little of eating half a pound of sugar at a sitting.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 206


On the tray, too, was the metal vessel which had contained the black wine, steaming and bitter, from far Thentis, famed for its tarn flocks, the small yellow-enameled cups from which we had drunk the black wine, its spoons and sugars, a tiny bowl of mint sticks, and the softened, dampened cloths on which we had wiped our fingers.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 10


"Drink," said Kenneth to Taphris, who knelt at our side. She thrust the bottle filled with water, thick with sugar, to Kenneth who, holding it for me, poured some of it down my throat. I spit the rest of it away into the sand. Kenneth pushed the bottle back to Taphris.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 252


Lola now returned to the small table and, kneeling, head down, served us our dessert; slices of tospit, sprinkled with four Gorean sugars.
. . .
"You may serve the black wine now, in small cups, Lola," said Miss Henderson.
"Yes, Mistress," whispered Lola.
This was a delicacy. I had purchased some, some days ago, but we had not yet served it. In a few Ehn Lola returned with the tray, with the vessel of steaming liquid, the creams and sugars, the tiny cups, and the small spoons for mixing and measuring.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 132


"Masters," said Peggy, approaching the table, kneeling beside it, bearing a tray. She placed the tray on the table, and removed three plates of bread and meat from it, a dish of assorted cheeses, a bowl of dates, a pitcher of water, a pot of black wine, steaming, and tiny vessels of sugars and creams, and three goblets.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 233


She poured into the cups only the amount that would be compatible with the assorted sugars and creams which the guest might desire, if any, these being added in, and stirred, if, and as, pertinent, by Aemilianus' slave, who directed the serving.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 244


I lifted the tiny silver cup to my lips and took a drop of the black wine. Its strength and bitterness are such that it is normally drunk in such a manner, usually only a drop or a few drops at a time. Commonly, too, it is mollified with creams and sugars. I drank it without creams and sugars, perhaps, for I had been accustomed, on Earth, to drinking coffee in such a manner, and the black wine of Gor is clearly coffee, or closely akin to coffee.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 247


I watched her as she mixed in a plentiful helping of powdered bosk milk, and two of the assorted sugars. She then left the small, rounded metal cup on the tray.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 296


My goods, substantially, consisted of blankets, colored cloths, ribbons, mirrors and beads, kettles and pans, popular in the grasslands, hard candies, cake sugar and chemical dyes.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 145


He then began to pass out, to the Dust-Leg men and women about, pieces of candy, lumps of cake sugar and flakes of dried molasses.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 216


A few feet to the left of the kaiila there was a keg of sugar, which had been split open. A trail of sugar, some four inches wide, some three or four yards long, drained through the split lid, had been run out behind it. It had probably been carried under someone's arm.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 269


Alcinoë, as she was Gorean, had the honor of bringing forth the vessel and cups, and my slave, as she was a barbarian, and thus subordinate, unless it was otherwise specified, brought forth the small pitcher of cream, the tiny spoons, and the small, flat bowls of sugars and spices.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 579


As slave feed, however, it is commonly served plain and bland, served without spices, sugars, salts, or other flavors.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 295


Steaming black wine, with its trays of sugars and creams, one of which I bore, and liqueurs, some apparently from as far away as Turia, were being served.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 403


"Do not neglect the black wine, flavored with Turian sugars," said a fellow in merchant robes, nearby.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 529





 


Sugared
To The Top


I did not much care for the sweet, syrupy wines of Turia, flavored and sugared to the point where one could almost leave one's fingerprint on their surface.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 83 - 84


Hup's attention was now drawn to the side of the table where there was a sugared pastry, which he began to eye hungrily.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 326


With our fingers and, like cats, with our tongues, we finished the gruel. It was plain. It was not sugared or salted. It was slave gruel.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 66


I fingered some of the meal into my mouth. It was in a glutinous, semisolid glob. It was neither sugared nor salted.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 209





 


Sugared Pellet
To The Top


I held her head on my shoulder. What she said was to a large extent true, for she was being conditioned to certain responses by pain and rewards. Indeed, sometimes the girls would be forced to compete among themselves, with small candies as prizes, and each would find herself, to her subsequent horror, striving eagerly to outdo the others, that it might be she to whom Sura would throw the sugared pellet. Sometimes Sura would let the men observing determine which girl should receive the pellet, that they might learn how to win men's pleasure.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Pages 194 - 195





 


Suls
To The Top


The principal ingredients of Sullage are the golden Sul, the starchy, golden-brown vine-borne fruit of the golden-leaved Sul plant;
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 44


The Tarn Keeper, who was called by those in the tavern Mip, bought the food, bosk steak and yellow bread, peas and Torian olives, and two golden-brown, starchy Suls, broken open and filled with melted bosk cheese.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 168


Telima had prepared a roast tarsk, stuffed with suls and peppers from Tor.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 114


I recall seeing, crouched against the wall of a building near the postern gate of the palace of Lurius, a coarse-robed figure, foolishly come too early to sell his vegetables, suls and turpah, near the palace.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 181


The slave boy, Fish, had emerged from the kitchen, holding over his head on a large silver platter a whole roasted tarsk, steaming and crisped, basted, shining under the torchlight, a larma in its mouth, garnished with suls and Tur-Pah.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 219


Tina, on the other hand, had been kept in the slave strap and bracelets, except when she was working in the kitchen area, cooking, and peeling suls and such.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 66


I saw too, fields, fenced with rocks, in the sloping area. In them were growing, small at this season, shafts of Sa-Tarna; too, there would be peas, and beans, cabbages and onions, and patches of the golden sul, capable of surviving at this latitude.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


"You," he said, "gather verr dung in your kirtle and carry it to the sul patch!"
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 101


She, holding her kirtle with her left hand, angrily scattered the dung about the sul plants. It would be left to a thrall to hoe it in about the plants.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 104


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls,
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


The Sul is a tuberous root of the Sul plant; it is a Gorean staple.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 134


"Soup! Soup!" called a man.
"Soup!" I called, raising my hand. I purchased from him, for a copper tarsk, a bowl of soup, thick with shreds of hot bosk and porous chunks of boiled sul.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 51


"That is ten copper tarsks," had said the man last night, placing before me a bowl of sul porridge. I had not argued. I had paid him.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 38


I lowered the sul porridge to the table. It was not good, but it was hot.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 39


With a serving prong she placed narrow strips of roast bosk and fried sul on my plate.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 234


"Suls, Turpah, Vangis!" I heard a woman call, sitting amidst baskets, hawking her produce.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 314


Lady Yanina, kneeling before a pan of water, under the supervision of Rowena, who was tending the fire, was washing and scraping garden vegetables, mostly onions, turnips and suls. These would later be used in a stew.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 248


"Here," she said, embarrassed. She drew some roots, and two suls, from her robe. They had been freshly dug. Dirt still clung to them. She put them down on the stones, between us. I sat down cross-legged, and she knelt down, opposite me, knees together, in the common fashion of the Gorean free woman. The roots, the two suls, were between us. She rocked the child in her arms.

"I thought you could find no roots." I smiled.

"Some were left in the garden," she said. "I remembered them. I came back for them. There was very little left though. Others obviously had come before me. These things were missed. They are poor stuff. We used to use the produce of that garden for tarsk feed."

"They are fine roots," I said, "and splendid Suls."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 22


About the beasts' necks, and behind the saddles, hung panniers of grain and sacks of woven netting containing dried larmas and brown suls.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 36


He then went about his business. The woman near us, sitting on a blanket on the stones, her basket of suls before her, looked up. "Do you want suls?" she asked.
"No," I said.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 268


I heard another woman's voice, this one hawking fish, and then the voice of another woman, that one hawking suls. The sul is a large, thick-skinned, starchy, yellow-fleshed root vegetable. It is very common on this world. There are a thousand ways in which it is prepared. It is fed even to slaves. I had had some at the house, narrow, cooked slices smeared with butter, sprinkled with salt, fed to me by hand.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 80


Kika and Tira were washing suls. These would be later baked, and used in the evening feeding.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 637


He was partly bent over, as were the others, carrying, tied on a frame, in a large, open, netlike sack, large and bulging, a considerable quantity of suls, these golden-skinned, suls, a common, tuberous Gorean vegetable.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 322


She saw the stand of a vendor below, one selling perhaps candied suls, or tastas.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 342


One, too, dug him tubers, wild suls, and the other brought him tree fruit, kernelled pods which dangle from the Bar tree, native, as we understand it, neither to Earth or Gor.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 183


"Take this," said Cabot, pressing a rind of sul into her hands, and she put down her head and fed on it, kneeling, gratefully, her hair falling about her wrists.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 470


"I think the tabuk strips, the suls and turpah, the soup, all, must be ready," said Pertinax. "Let us have supper."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 53


Pertinax's Jane bore a large wooden plate of roast suls. More than once it had been replenished at the kitchen area, the suls withdrawn from the ashes of several "long fires."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 410


The taverner turned to his man. "Bring bread, and meat, suls, and tur-pah, and fruit, for our guest."
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 5


I had breakfasted well, on larma, vulo eggs, fried sul,
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 76


Four docksmen passed, each bearing on his shoulder a bulging, porous, loosely woven sack of reddish suls.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 81


but, too, certain plants whose roots were edible, as the wild Sul;
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 243


I did not know what they were, but from the texture of the root and its starchiness, I would have supposed some tiny variety of wild Sul.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 245


Then I found a Sul plant the golden Sul, and dug out the tuber, washed it clean in the water, and consumed it, I fear voraciously.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 267


A sul was thrown to the ground before each of us. We might not touch it, until we had received the order to feed.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 285


Other than Tur-Pah, I could recognize the leafage which betokened Suls, usually found in the open, in drier, sandier soils,
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 442


"There are golden suls," said Lord Yamada "with butter and cream, from our own dairy."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 206


Of the two bowls on the tray, one contained gruel, and the other, I conjectured, water. I did not know the contents of the bottle, but, I supposed, it would contain either ka-la-na or paga, most likely paga. As it was bottled, it was presumably not vat paga, but some selection from a more reserved, or private, stock, doubtless more expensive. The contents of the trencher still steamed. It was amply laden, with strips of roast bosk, suls hot with butter, a salad of tur-pah and nuts, slices of tospit, and two large wedges of fresh bread. Naturally I regarded these treasures with unfeigned interest. To the side were a flat spatulalike spoon, and a pointed stick, a northern analog to the Turian earing, or dining, prong.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 268


"Do you expect to dig suls?" asked the box. "Do you think peasants will share fields with you?"
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 411





 


Sullage
To The Top


First she boiled and simmered a kettle of Sullage, a common Gorean soup consisting of three standard ingredients and, as it is said, whatever else may be found, saving only the rocks of the field. The principal ingredients of Sullage are the golden Sul, the starchy, golden-brown vine-borne fruit of the golden-leaved Sul plant; the curled, red, ovate leaves of the Tur-Pah, a tree parasite, cultivated in host orchards of Tur trees, and the salty, blue secondary roots of the Kes Shrub, a small, deeply rooted plant which grows best in sandy soil.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Pages 44 - 45


the leaves of the Tur-Pah incidentally are edible and figure in certain Gorean dishes, such as sullage, a kind of soup;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 217


Soon, then, a pot of sullage, tended by Tula was bubbling over the fire. Emerald put some dried meat from her pack into the brew and Hiza cast in two handfuls of our picked berries into the brew. When the provender was ready, Tula, with a ladle, filled four shallow, golden bowls with the sullage, and, humbly, head down, as a slave, served the mistresses.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 293 - 294


One would prefer Tur-Pah, certainly on a cool night, boiled in Sullage, or in some stew or even fried, salted, and honeyed, but, too, it is often, perhaps most often, eaten raw. It is the basic ingredient in most Gorean salads.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 441


Odors, too, emanated from the crackling pans, plates, and griddles of the cook shops. Soup, usually thick, sometimes with suls, as in sullage, but commonly comprised of other vegetables and noodles, would be ladled into wooden bowls.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 251


Whereas some food had been brought from Ar in the wagon, some bread, and cold, prepared dishes, the latter for the free, more food had been bought from the shops in the caravanserai, some cubed, salted bosk, and some kes, tur-pah, and suls. In one of the two vessels suspended over the fire, Paula had prepared sullage, a sort of sul soup, or, in this case, given the thickness of the mix, a sul stew, and, in the other, had boiled the bosk cubes, heating and softening them. She had first, as is usually done, washed and scrubbed the cubes in fresh water, which is done to reduce the salt content and make the cubes more palatable.
"Open your mouth," said my master.
I obeyed, and he, from the pan in which the cubes now resided, placed one of the small cubes of bosk in my mouth. I could still taste the salt.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 616


I had been permitted, earlier, to hold a small sullage bowl in my hands, and, head down, feed from it. I did not think my master was weak. Rather, it was I who, when near him, was weak. I always, for some reason, felt weak in the presence of Gorean men.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 617





 


Supplements
To The Top


the Mul-Pellets are undoubtedly some type of dietary supplement;
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 109


The fellow who had thrust my face into the gruel was looking in my direction. Quickly I put my face back into the trough, thrusting it into the moist gruel. Feeding time was almost over. I did not care for the gruel much, as it was tasteless and flat. I ate it, however, as it was incumbent upon me to do so. Too, I was hungry, and it was undeniably nourishing. It, like other aspects of our diet, the fruits and vegetables, and the cylindrical pellets we were given, seemed intended to slim our bodies and bring us to a peak state of health. The gruel was appropriate enough for us, I supposed. It was clearly a form of animal feed.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 66


The next morning I was fed, pellets and gruel, in a pan thrust under the kennel gate and then, later, when I had relieved myself, brought forth for the first of my lessons in dance.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 150


"Is this that on which you are fed?" she asked.
"It is better," I said. "Often we have only slave pellets and slave gruel."
"I am sorry," she said.
"We are slaves," I said.
I picked up the plate and goblet. I stood up.
"The provender of slaves," I said, "is designed to keep us healthy, trim, and vital, as the masters want us. It would be the same with other animals."
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 326


There was no gruel here, no dried mush, no pellets.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 377


Let her think, thought he, she is still a free woman. She can learn later she is kajira. Besides, we may soon be eaten. Yet, thought he, I do not think we are to be eaten, certainly not yet, for we have not yet been eaten, and, too, if we were to be eaten, would we not be fattened, or such, not given this gruel, these pellets, and water?
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 110





 


Sweetmeat
To The Top


She became interested in the caravan and would spend hours walking alongside the colored wagons, sometimes hitching rides with the strap-masters, wheedling from them a piece of fruit or a sweetmeat.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 128


The crowd seemed eager to observe what would happen next. It stirred impatiently beneath the billowing silk of the awnings, rearranged its silken cushions, partook distractedly of candies and sweetmeats distributed by gray-robed figures.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 117


In one instant that must have been the most terrifying in her life the Tatrix stood alone, looking up, deserted by all, on the steps before her golden throne in the midst of tumbled cushions and trays of candies and sweetmeats.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 128


During the time of the race the hawkers of candies, sweetmeats, Kal-da, pastries and paga were quiet, standing with their goods in the aisles watching.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 139


Targo, and some of the guards, sometimes, would give her candies, and sweetmeats.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 61





 


Sweets
To The Top


A common problem with slave girls was petty thievery, as they attempted to steal pastries or sweets. Many slave girls have a craving for sweets. These are commonly kept from them. A girl might have to perform superbly for hours before her master before he, in his generosity, would consent to throw her a candy.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 77


"Candies! Candies!" called a hawker of sweets near me in the crowd. "Candies of Ar!"
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 54


He was a plump, jolly fellow with a weakness for sweets prodigious even among red hunters.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 294


Sometimes, when one sees a fearful girl refusing the smallest of sweets and exercising, almost in desperation, one may suspect, in amusement, that the day on which her master plans to check her measurements is not far distant.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 264


He replaced the sweets, wrapping them, carefully in his pouch.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 217


We had set a small table near the couch, bearing a decanter of wine, with glasses, and a small, tasteful array of sweets.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 414


"Look there," said Appanius. "See the wine, the sweets, on the table, there, beside the couch! Do you doubt that this has been arranged?"
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 425


Here and there I heard vendors hawking goods. One had pastries, another sweets. Another fellow, somewhere, was selling apricots.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 422


Then, at a sharp clapping of Mrs. Rawlinson's hands, we leapt up and hurried to the kitchen, to bring forth the fare, the sweets, the candies, the nuts, the bowls of fruit, the herbs, the bread, flat, circular loaves of bread, which would be divided into eight wedges, the many covered dishes of boiled vegetables and hot meat, the vessels of wine, and such, and placed these on the serving table from which place we began to serve the guests.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 32 - 33


We would bring the gamesters Paga and ka-la-na, and platters of meat and bread, and cakes and sweets, to keep them at the tables.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 61





 


Syrup
To The Top


I do not care too much for tospits, as they are quite bitter. Some men like them. They are commonly used, sliced and sweetened with honey, and in syrups, and to flavor, with their juices, a variety of dishes.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 102


I removed the stopper from the vial.
"It may itself be poison," said Samos.
I smelled it. It smelled sweet, not unlike a syrup of Turia.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 285


It had to do with "tastas" or "stick candies." These are not candies, incidentally, like sticks, as, for example, licorice or peppermint sticks, but soft, rounded, succulent candies, usually covered with a coating of syrup or fudge, rather in the nature of the caramel apple, but much smaller, and, like a caramel apple, mounted on sticks.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 81





 


Syrupy
To The Top


I did not much care for the sweet, syrupy wines of Turia, flavored and sugared to the point where one could almost leave one's fingerprint on their surface.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 83 - 84


I doubt that she had ever before experienced a drink stronger than the syrupy wines of Turia.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 157


One could tell a Turian because he insisted on celebrating the New Year at the summer solstice, for instance. They also used very sweet, syrupy wines, which were now, in many cities, available.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 160


"Slave wine," which, as administered to slaves, is terribly bitter, from the sip root, found in the Barrens, precluded conception. The "releaser," which is commonly syrupy, and sweet, nullifies the effects of the "slave wine."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 197





 


Ta Wine
To The Top


One girl held back our head, and others, from goblets, gave us of wines, Turian wine, sweet and thick, Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes, from the terraces of Cos, wines even, Ka-la-nas, sweets and drys, from distant Ar.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 213


Free tarsk and roast bosk were being served, and Sa-Tarna bread and Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes of the Cosian terraces.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 98


"It is a small dish," said the Lady Florence, "the white meat of roast vulos, prepared in a sauce of spiced Sa-Tarna and Ta wine."
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 286


It was a Ta wine, from the Ta grapes of the terraces of Cos.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 306





 


Tabuk
To The Top


Once I brought the carcass of a tabuk, one of Gor's single-horned, yellow antelopes, which I had felled in a Ka-la-na thicket, to the hut of a peasant and his wife. Asking no questions, as was suitable given the absence of insignia on my garments, they feasted me on my own kill, and gave me fiber, and flints and a skin of wine.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 48


my mouth watered for a tabuk steak
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 76


Small straight bows, of course, not the powerful long bow, are, on the other hand, reasonably common on Gor, and these are often used for hunting light game, such as the brush-maned, three-toed Qualae, the yellow-pelted, single-horned Tabuk, and runaway slaves.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 4


On a wooden spit, set on sticks, grease dropping into the fire and flaming, was a thigh of tabuk.
It smelled good. The smoke, in a thin line, trickled upward into the sky.
The thigh of tabuk was tended by a squatting panther girl, who, from time to time, picked bits of meat from it and thrust them in her mouth. She sucked her fingers clean.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 115


That night I hunted and felled a tabuk, which kill I brought back to my camp, that my prisoners and the paga slaves, now the keepers of my prisoners, might feed. We could not, of course, risk a fire. I cut pieces of meat from the animal, and gave them to the paga slaves, to thrust into the mouths of the panther girls.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 204


I washed with a bit of water from a stream, ate some tabuk strips from my wallet, and went again to the edge of the forest.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Pages 249 - 250


whereas there is game in the Tahari, birds, small mammals, an occasional sand sleen, and some species of tabuk, it is rare;
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 71


The flesh of a desert tabuk which dies in the desert, perhaps separated from its herd, and unable to find water, if undisturbed by the salivary juices of predators, remains edible for several days.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 117


He cut a small piece of meat and put it between my teeth. It was roast tabuk. He gestured back to the other man with the knife. I went to the other man and knelt before him, the bit of meat clenched between my teeth. The man, sitting cross-legged by the fire, indicated I should approach him, and put the meat in his mouth. Reddening with shame, I did so. I extended my head to him delicately and he, with his mouth, took the meat from between my teeth. The men struck their left shoulders with pleasure. Man after man I so served. I had carried meat before in my mouth, not permitted to touch it, but then I had not been bound, then I had not knelt, then they had not taken it from me in their mouths.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 67


"Red hunters of the polar basin, trading for tea and sugar, have reported the failure of the herd to appear."

"That is puzzling," I said.

"It is more serious than that," he said. "It means the perishing of the men of the polar basin, or their near starvation. They depend on the tabuk in the summer for food."
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 36


We were knelt outside the cook shack. We were given wooden bowls. We were served gruel, mixed with thick chunks of boiled tabuk, by the blond,
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 162


I smelled roast tabuk.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 195


He pulled her from the tent, stumbling, to the pole behind the tent, that from which tabuk meat was sometimes hung to dry.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 219


The hunt had gone well. Imnak and I had brought down four tabuk. Poalu, whom Imnak, with my consent, had made first girl, and the other girls, had followed us. Poalu had showed them how to cut the meat and lay it out on stones to dry.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 222


"Behold!" cried Fel Doron, from the other side of the wagon. "See, look here!"

Then he emerged from the other side of the wagon. He carried, across his shoulders, the body of a freshly killed grass tabuk.

"How came this to the camp?" inquired Portus Canio.

"I know not," he said, grinning.

"We will feast this night," said Portus Canio, looking out, over the grasses.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 648


"The soup is hot," said Constantina. "Surely you can tell that, stupid slave. Hurry, wrap the tabuk strips on their skewers, and put them to the fire. Are the suls and turpah ready?"
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 47


"I think the tabuk strips, the suls and turpah, the soup, all, must be ready," said Pertinax. "Let us have supper."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 53


There was plenty of tabuk and tarsk, and the slaves brought it to the men on steaming platters.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 409


"There is provender aplenty in the kitchens, " he said, "forest tarsk, long-haired bosk, even tabuk. The Pani hunters provide well."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 238





 


Tarsk
To The Top


my mouth watered for a tabuk steak or, perhaps, if I were lucky, a slice of roast tarsk, the formidable six-tusked wild boar of Gor's temperate forests.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 76


The proprietor arrived with hot bread, honey, salt and, to my delight, a huge, hot roasted chunk of tarsk. I crammed my mouth with food and washed it down with another thundering draught of Kal-da.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 79


I had tarsk meat and yellow bread with honey, Gorean peas and a tankard of diluted Ka-la-na, warm water mixed with wine.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 87


"And put bread over the fire," I said, "and honey, and the eggs of vulos, and fried tarsk meat and a Torian larma fruit."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 106


Roasted tarsks on long spits were borne to the tables on the shoulders of nude slave girls.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 311


I had also been used to carry heavy kettles of rence beer from the various islands to the place of feasting, as well as strings of water gourds, poles of fish, plucked gants, slaughtered tarsks, and baskets of the pith of rence.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 41


Before the feast I had helped the women, cleaning fish and dressing marsh gants, and then, later, turning spits for the roasted tarsks, roasted over rence-root fires kept on metal pans, elevated above the rence of the island by metal racks, themselves resting on larger pans.
. . .
I had carried about bowls of cut, fried fish, and wooden trays of roasted tarsk meat, and roasted gants, threaded on sticks, and rence cakes and porridges, and gourd flagons, many times replenished, of rence beer.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 44


Telima had prepared a roast tarsk, stuffed with suls and peppers from Tor.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 114


I looked up. The slave boy, Fish, had emerged from the kitchen, holding over his head on a large silver platter a whole roasted tarsk, steaming and crisped, basted, shining under the torchlight, a larma in its mouth, garnished with suls and Tur-Pah.

The men cried out, summoning him to their table.

It had been on one side, a land side, of that last remaining fortress of Henrius Sevarius, that Lysias, Henrak, and others had emerged from a postern, carrying the heavy sack which they had hurled into the canal, that sack from which I had saved the boy.

Fish put down the whole roasted tarsk before the men. He was sweating. He wore a single, simple rep-cloth tunic. I had had a plate collar hammered about his neck. I had had him branded.

The men ordered him away again, that he might fetch yet another roasted tarsk from the spit which he had been turning slowly over the coal fires during the afternoon. He sped away.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Pages 219 - 220


I then thrust some strips of dried tarsk meat in my belt. I called the lookout down from the basket, that I might climb to his place. In the basket I wrapped the admiral's cloak about me, began to chew on a piece of tarsk meat, as much against the cold as the hunger, and took out the glass of the builders.

I examined the state of the battle.

Tarsk meat tends to be salty. There is usually a water gourd kept at the masthead, for the lookout. I uncorked the gourd and took some of the water.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 265


We could smell roast tarsk from somewhere.
. . .
The smell of roast tarsk became stronger and, to our delight, the wagons turned and rolled into one of the huge warehouses. The floor was smooth. When we were inside the doors were closed. Then, kneeling, delighted, we were fed bread and roast tarsk, and hot bosk milk.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 87 - 88


Merchants brought sides of bosk, and thighs of tarsk, and wines and fruits to camp, and cheeses and breads and nuts, and flowers and candies and silks and honeys.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 321


The two bond-maids, stripped, too, like the others, for the feast, Pretty Ankles and Pouting Lips, struggled down the length of the smoky, dark hall, a spitted, roasted tarsk on their shoulders. They were slapped by the men, hurrying them along. They laughed with pleasure. Their shoulders were protected from the heat of the metal spit by rolls of leather. The roasted tarsk was flung before us on the table. With his belt knife, thrusting Pudding and Gunnhild back, Ivar Forkbeard addressed himself to the cutting of the meat. He threw pieces down the length of the table.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 91


Many were the roast tarsk and roast bosk that had roasted over the long fire, on the iron spits.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 191


And brightly glowed the long fire in the hall, over which tarsk and bosk, crackling and glistening with hot fat, roasted, turned heavily on spits by eager, laughing bond-maids.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 279


"Where are the merchant tables," I asked a fellow from Torvaldsland, with braided blond hair and shaggy jacket, eating on a roast hock of tarsk, "where the odds on the Kaissa matches are being given?"
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 43


"You speak clearly for one of the south," he said. He thrust the hock of roast tarsk to me. I took it and, holding it with both hands, cut at it with my teeth. I tore away a good piece of meat. I had not had food since the morning, when I arrived at the fair.
"My thanks," I said.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 44


Free tarsk and roast bosk were being served, and Sa-Tarna bread and Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes of the Cosian terraces.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 98


She turned the tarsk on its spit. It glistened. From its sides droplets of fat and blood, popping and sizzling, dropped into the fire.

With a large rock, blow by blow, heavily, inch by inch, I drove the long, thick stake into the ground. I left about four inches of it exposed.

"The tarsk is ready," she said.

I took one end of the spit in two hands and lifted the tarsk from the fire, putting it down on leaves. I then crouched beside it, and began to cut into it, to the spit. I looked up. The girl, kneeling by the fire, watched me. I rose to my feet. I tied a long leather strap on her neck and led her to the slave stake. I tied the free end of the strap about the slave stake, using the prepared groove in the stake which I had earlier cut. "Kneel," I told her. "Yes, Master," she said. She then knelt there, tethered to the stake by the neck. I had left her about seven feet of slack in the strap. I then returned to the meat, and began to cut slices from it, and feed. After I had begun to feel full I looked at the girl. I threw her a piece of meat, which struck against her body. It fell to the ground. She picked it up in two hands and, watching me, began to eat it.

After a time I wiped my face with my forearm. I was finished eating. I again looked at the girl. "Do you want more?" I asked. "No, Master," she said.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 349


I took a piece of meat from the table, one of the viands I had brought from the camp, a small tidbit of roast tarsk. I held it out to her.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 116


After a time, Boots, sucking his fingers, removing the grease from fried tarsk strips from them, turned about.
. . .
Boots then helped himself to some more rolls and slices of fried tarsk.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 210


"Thank you," I said, and sat down with them, cross-legged. It was still rather early. Soon I was helping myself to a heaping serving of vulo eggs, tarsk strips and rolls.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 212


I bit on some crisp tarsk strips.
"You are certainly a communicative fellow this morning," said Boots.
"The tarsk is good," I said.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 213


"Bread, meat!" called a fellow, coming up beside the cart.
Several of us availed ourselves of his provender. I bought some wedges of Sa-Tarna bread and slices of dried tarsk meat, taking some and giving the rest to Boabissia and Hurtha.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 257


Fortunately I had some dried tarsk strips in my pack.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 137


"Roast tarsk!" announced Philebus, proudly, approaching the burly fellow, gesturing to one of his helpers, who was accompanying him, bearing a tray of steaming meat. The burly fellow seized a joint of hot, dripping tarsk from the platter and bit into it. "Excellent!" beamed Philebus, then indicating to his assistant that he should carry the tray about, to serve others, as well.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 25


"Master," she said, preparing the small rack and skillet for cooking strips of tarsk.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 442


The strips of meat he was given were from wild tarsk, and had been dried, being hung from branches. The forest people did not cook their meat, even when freshly taken. They lacked the mastery of fire, its making and control.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 183


Roast tarsk, brought down but an Ahn before, in the dusk, skinned and gutted, was on the spit, and grease hissed, when it fell to the fire.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 594


To one side there was a tank for water and there were several racks from which hung meat, probably tabuk, forest tarsk, and forest bosk. The greater forest tarsk, unlike the common tarsk, can be quite large.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 251


Indeed, many Goreans have never seen the forest tarsk, and many do not know of its existence.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 251


There was plenty of tabuk and tarsk, and the slaves brought it to the men on steaming platters.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 409


She struck the trencher down before me, insolently, with a crack, and gruel and strips of roast tarsk spilled upon the table.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 198


"I hope they will have tarsk," said a man.
I hoped that, too, as I was growing weary of rice and parsit. The Pani do raise tarsk, verr, and, of course, vulos.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 425


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


"I want you to own me!" I said. "What are you doing?"

"Shackling you," he said. "I think the hunters will return. I think they will want a feast, with roast tarsk. You and the others, later, will be needed to prepare and serve the feast."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 407


Grease from the tarsk, on the spit, dripped into the fire, hissing there. Eve and I turned the spit.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 408


I now understood the extensive preparations, the mysterious recent behavior of Lord Grendel, the excitement of the Lady Bina the ka-la-na purchased, the flavorsome herbs, the bosk and tarsk, the early cooking.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 632


It was a far cry from the provenders I had been taught to prepare in the house, ranging from roasted, seasoned bosk and tarsk and fresh plate breads, with honeys and butters, to frosted pastries and decadent, creamed sauces which, in some cities, were outlawed by sumptuary laws.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111


"There is provender aplenty in the kitchens, " he said, "forest tarsk, long-haired bosk, even tabuk. The Pani hunters provide well."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 238


"Meat is also available, Tarl Cabot tarnsman," he said. "I have seen to it. Coast gull, vulo, tarsk, verr, and mountain deer."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204





 


Tarts
To The Top


"I shop for wealthy women," said she, "for pastries and tarts and cakes things they will not trust their female slaves to buy."
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 238





 


Tasta
To The Top


He yelled something raucous and ribald. It had to do with "tastas" or "stick candies." These are not candies, incidentally, like sticks, as, for example, licorice or peppermint sticks, but soft, rounded, succulent candies, usually covered with a coating of syrup or fudge, rather in the nature of the caramel apple, but much smaller, and, like a caramel apple, mounted on sticks. The candy is prepared and then the stick, from the bottom, is thrust up, deeply, into it. It is then ready to be eaten. As the candy is held neatly in place there is very little mess in this arrangement. Similarly, as the candy is held in its fixed position, it may, in spite of its nature, be eaten, or bitten, or licked or sucked, as swiftly, or slowly, and as much at one's leisure as one might please. These candies are usually sold at such places as parks, beaches, and promenades, at carnivals, expositions and fairs, and at various types of popular events, such as plays, song dramas, races, games, and kaissa matches. They are popular even with children.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 81


A tasta is a kind of small, sweet candy, usually sold at fairs. It is commonly mounted on a stick.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 148


"Apricots! Apricots!" called a vendor.
"Pastries!" called another "Pastries!"
"Tastas!" called another. "Tastas!"
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 431


Ellen did not know what a tasta was. Later she learned that it was a confection, a small, soft candy mounted on a stick.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 135


She saw the stand of a vendor below, one selling perhaps candied suls, or tastas.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 342


One fellow was hawking tastas, which is a confection, mounted on a stick. Sometimes female slaves are referred to as tastas.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 100


A vendor went by, just below our level, on the walkway, hawking tastas.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 315


Debris was about, useless betting tickets, discarded programs, tasta sticks, food wrappers, and such.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 330





 


Tharlarion
To The Top


six-toed rock tharlarion of southern Torvaldsland, favored for their legs and tails, which are speared by children.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 152


In one place there was a dead tharlarion, and the women, some crouching on it, were cutting it into pieces with knives, putting pieces of meat in their mouths, and hiding other pieces in their dresses.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 96


"We starve," he said.
"Then you know not where to look for food," I said.
"There are the sharks, the tharlarion," he said.
"Such are sources of nourishment," I said.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 280


I cut into the small tharlarion I had killed, its leathery hide already stripped away. I had brought it with me, over my shoulder, when I had announced myself at the camp's periphery, calling Plenius forward to assure my safe entry into the camp. It had been my supposition the men of Ar might be appreciative of food, even of such a nature.

I took a bit of the raw flesh and held it toward the fellow who had expressed his disinclination to believe in the delta's ready provender.

"No," he said.

"You are hungry," I said.

"I cannot eat that," he said.

I ate the bit of meat myself, and cut another.

"It is not even cooked," said another.

"You will make no fires," I said. "A line of smoke can mark a camp. At night the flame of a tharlarion-oil lamp can be seen hundreds of yards away, even the flash of a fire-maker. Such things, spotted from the air, for example, I assure you, will not be neglected by a tarn scout."

"Who wishes this viand?" I asked, holding up the next piece of tharlarion meat.

"Not I," said a fellow, warily.

"Nor I," said another.

"It makes me sick to look at it," said another.

"I cannot eat that," said another.

Perhaps if they were hungrier, I thought, they might be less fastidious. Yet I reminded myself that men had tragically starved where abounded food aplenty, perhaps from ignorance, perhaps from fear, perhaps from an irrational reluctance to seize the necessities of survival.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 302


"If you are going to kill me," said Cabot to Grendel, "might we not eat first? Perhaps you have some meat, from tharlarion."
. . .
"I will not eat raw tharlarion," said the Lady Bina. "We are now on land. You must find me something better."
. . .
Cabot was chewing on a strip of tharlarion, to soften it, before tearing it into small bits, these then to be better chewed and swallowed.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 332 & 339 - 340





 


Tiny Quivering Thing
To The Top


Saphrar, eyes closed, was nibbling on a tiny thing, still quivering, which had been impaled on a colored stick.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 86





 


Tospits
To The Top


On the back of the kaiila, the black lance in hand, bending down in the saddle, I raced past a wooden wand fixed in the earth, on the top of which was placed a dried tospit, a small, wrinkled, yellowish-white peachlike fruit, about the size of a plum, which grows on the tospit bush, patches of which are indigenous to the drier valleys of the western Cartius. They are bitter but edible.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 59


He looked at me shrewdly and, to my surprise, drew a tospit out of his pouch, that yellowish-white, bitter fruit, looking something like a peach but about the size of a plum. He threw me the tospit.

"Odd or even?" he asked.

I had resolved not to wager with Kamchak, but this was indeed an opportunity to gain a certain amount of vengeance which, on my part, would be sorely appreciated. Usually, in guessing tospit seeds, one guesses the actual number, and usually both guessers opt for an odd number. The common tospit almost invariably has an odd number of seeds. On the other hand the rare, long-stemmed tospit usually has an even number of seeds. Both fruits are indistinguishable outwardly. I could see that, perhaps by accident, the tospit which Kamchak had thrown me had had the stem twisted off. It must be then, I surmised, the rare, long-stemmed tospit.

"Even," I said.

Kamchak looked at me as though pained. "Tospits almost always have an odd number of seeds," he said.

"Even," I said.

"Very well," said he, "eat the tospit and see."

"Why should I eat it?" I asked. The tospit, after all, is quite bitter. And why shouldn't Kamchak eat it? He had suggested the wager.

"I am a Tuchuk," said Kamchak, "I might be tempted to swallow seeds."

"Let's cut it up," I proposed.

"One might miss a seed that way," said Kamchak. "Perhaps we could mash the slices," I suggested.

"But would that not be a great deal of trouble," asked Kamchak, "and might one not stain the rug?"

"Perhaps we could mash them in a bowl," I suggested.

"But then a bowl would have to be washed," said Kamchak.

"That is true," I admitted.

"All things considered," said Kamchak, "I think the fruit should be eaten."

"I guess you are right," I said.

I bit into the fruit philosophically. It was indeed bitter.

"Besides," said Kamchak, "I do not much care for tospits."

"I am not surprised," I said.

"They are quite bitter," said Kamchak.

"Yes," I said.

I finished the fruit and, of course, it had seven seeds.

"Most tospits," Kamchak informed me, "have an odd number of seeds."

"I know," I said.

"Then why did you guess even?" he asked.

"I supposed," I grumbled, "that you would have found a long-stemmed tospit."

"But they are not available," he said, "until late in the summer."

"Oh," I said.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 149 - 150


The tospits, in the Forkbeard's orchard, which can grow at this latitude, as the larma cannot, were too green to eat. I smiled, recalling that tospits almost invariably have an odd number of seeds, saving the rarer, long-stemmed variety. I do not care too much for tospits, as they are quite bitter. Some men like them. They are commonly used, sliced and sweetened with honey, and in syrups, and to flavor, with their juices, a variety of dishes. They are also excellent in the prevention of nutritional deficiencies at sea, in long voyages, containing, I expect, a great deal of vitamin C. They are sometimes called the seaman's larma. They are a fairly hardfleshed fruit, and are not difficult to dry and store. On the serpents they are carried in small barrels, usually kept, with vegetables, under the overturned keel of the longboat.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 102


Larma and tospits are also grown at the oases, in small orchards.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


A boy passed, spitting out the seeds of a tospit. The thought of Kamchak, of the Tuchuks, passed through my mind. I smiled. Only the rare, long-stemmed tospit contained an even number of seeds. On the Plains of Turia, or in the Land of the Wagon Peoples, it was available only late in the summer. Here, in Tor, however, with its two growing seasons, they might be available much earlier. Still, if pressed, I would have guessed that the boy's tospit contained an odd number of seeds. Most tospits do. I would not, however, have been likely to wager on the matter with Kamchak of the Tuchuks. I was mildly surprised that the boy had been eating the tospit raw, for they are quite bitter,
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 45 - 46


"Thank you, Master," I said. The slice of tospit was thrust in my mouth. The cage gate behind me was snapped shut. I bit into the tospit. It was bitter, but juicy. It was relished by my body. I made each drop last as long as I could. I had not finished it even when the feeding was done and the hatch closed, shutting us again in the darkness of the hold of the slave ship.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 321


Before each guests there were tiny slices of tospit and larma, small pastries, and, in a tiny golden cup, with a small golden spoon, the clustered, black, tiny eggs of the white grunt.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Pages 275 - 276


Lola now returned to the small table and, kneeling, head down, served us our dessert; slices of tospit, sprinkled with four Gorean sugars.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 132


Two days ago I had stolen a tospit from the fruit bin, and had been switched for my trouble, a slight, betraying yellow stain having been noted at the corner of my mouth.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 155


Odors, too, emanated from the crackling pans, plates, and griddles of the cook shops. Soup, usually thick, sometimes with suls, as in sullage, but commonly comprised of other vegetables and noodles, would be ladled into wooden bowls. And there would be, too, behind the counter, in baskets, grapes, tospits, larmas, nuts, and olives, and, in blocks, cheeses, and, in its amphorae to be lifted from its racks, cheap ka-la-na.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 251


The contents of the trencher still steamed. It was amply laden, with strips of roast bosk, suls hot with butter, a salad of tur-pah and nuts, slices of tospit, and two large wedges of fresh bread. Naturally I regarded these treasures with unfeigned interest. To the side were a flat spatulalike spoon, and a pointed stick, a northern analog to the Turian earing, or dining, prong.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 268


"It is the season for tospits," she said, "I was sent there to assess their quality, for this early in the season."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 344


Too, it is not that unusual for unattended slaves to be back-braceleted. In this way they are much less likely to seize up a tospit or small larma from a vendor's cart.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 366


You have not tasted the tospits in black syrup, have you?" inquired the reclining, garlanded male.

"No, Master," I said, kneeling, offering the plate to him.

"Open your mouth," he said, "and stick our your tongue."

How pleased I was that I had not, even in the kitchen, thrust so much as a finger into the syrup and licked it.

I did not wish to be whipped.

He thrust a food prong into the bowl, lifted forth a drenched tospit slice, and, nibbling, savored it.

"Excellent," he said.

"A slave is pleased," I said.

He then thrust the prong once more into the bowl, secured some three or four more slices, and slid them onto his plate, which was already laden with parsley, steamed rice, fried verr, and roast bosk.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 398


My serving dish was shortly empty, and I knew I should withdraw to the kitchen, either to have it layered with more syrupped tospit slices, or supplied with another provender, perhaps rice, white, or brown, or red or purple, from Cos, or a plate of cheeses, from local dairies, served with warmed bread, or prepared after the fashion of Ti, rolled in honeyed tur-pah leaves.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 401





 


Tree Fruit
To The Top


One, too, dug him tubers, wild suls, and the other brought him tree fruit, kernelled pods which dangle from the Bar tree, native, as we understand it, neither to Earth or Gor.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 183


But wines, as is well known, may be derived not only from the clustered fruits weighting the branches of the ka-la-na tree in the autumn, but, as on my former world, from vine fruit, tree fruit, bush fruit, even from some types of leaves.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 295





 


Tubers
To The Top


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls,
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


The Sul is a tuberous root of the Sul plant; it is a Gorean staple.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 134


He was partly bent over, as were the others, carrying, tied on a frame, in a large, open, netlike sack, large and bulging, a considerable quantity of suls, these golden-skinned, suls, a common, tuberous Gorean vegetable.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 322


One, too, dug him tubers, wild suls,
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 183


I found some small, tuberous roots which had been missed, or rejected. I did not know what they were, but from the texture of the root and its starchiness, I would have supposed some tiny variety of wild Sul.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 245


Then I found a Sul plant the golden Sul, and dug out the tuber, washed it clean in the water, and consumed it, I fear voraciously.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 267





 


Tumits
To The Top


beyond them I saw one of the tumits, a large, flightless bird whose hooked beak, as long as my forearm, attested only too dearly to its gustatory habits; I lifted my shield and grasped the long spear, but it did not turn in my direction;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 2


On the saddle there also hung, on one side, a coiled rope of braided boskhide and, on the other, a long, three-weighted bola of the sort used in hunting tumits and men;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 11


Slowly, singing in a gutteral chant, a Tuchuk warrior song, he began to swing the bola. It consists of three long straps of leather, each about five feet long, each terminating in a leather sack which contains, sewn inside, a heavy, round, metal weight. It was probably developed for hunting the tumit, a huge, flightless carnivorous bird of the plains, but the Wagon Peoples use it also, and well, as a weapon of war.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 24


We rode without speaking but Kamchak, for the first time in weeks, whistled a tune. Once he turned to Harold. "I think in a few days we might hunt tumits," he remarked.
"I would enjoy that," remarked Harold.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 324





 


Turian Liqueur
To The Top


It was now in the early evening. Miss Henderson and I, with small cups of a Turian liqueur before us, lounged in the living room. A tharlarion-oil lamp lit the room.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 134


Later, rising from her knees within, at a gesture from her master, the slave brought forth and served small glasses of Turian liqueurs.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Pages 696 - 697


The slaves now, at our supper, brought forth the Turian liqueurs.
"These are expensive," I said.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 578


How fortunate we were, how privileged, how generous the master! Many free persons, doubtless, had never tasted a Turian liqueur, not to speak of that of Falnus.

"Enough, enough," said Kleomenes.

"Thank you, Master!" we breathed.

It was like a sweet burning drop of liquid fire, flavored with flower herbs and, detectably, tospit and larma.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 415





 


Turian Sugar
To The Top


"Do not neglect the black wine, flavored with Turian sugars," said a fellow in merchant robes, nearby.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 529





 


Turian Wine
To The Top


I did not much care for the sweet, syrupy wines of Turia, flavored and sugared to the point where one could almost leave one's fingerprint on their surface.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 83 - 84


I doubt that she had ever before experienced a drink stronger than the syrupy wines of Turia.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 157


Before them had been placed large golden dishes heaped with delicacies prepared by the kitchens of the Ubar, tall precious goblets filled with Turian wines, the small bowls of spices and sugars with their stirring spoons at hand.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 253


As I may have mentioned the Turians, on the whole, favor thick, sweet wines.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 275


One could tell a Turian because he insisted on celebrating the New Year at the summer solstice, for instance. They also used very sweet, syrupy wines, which were now, in many cities, available.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 160


I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48


One girl held back our head, and others, from goblets, gave us of wines, Turian wine, sweet and thick, Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes, from the terraces of Cos, wines even, Ka-la-nas, sweets and drys, from distant Ar.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 213


One girl held back our head, and others, from goblets, gave us of wines, Turian wine, sweet and thick, Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes, from the terraces of Cos, wines even, Ka-la-nas, sweets and drys, from distant Ar.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 213





 


Turnips
To The Top


"I have peas and turnips, garlic and onions in my hut," said the man, his bundle like a giant's hump on his back.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 29


"Dorna the Proud," said the slave, who tumbled onions, turnips, radishes, potatoes and bread into the feed trough.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 155


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


"They supplement their diets by picking berries and digging wild turnips," said the first lad.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 124


There is no simple translation for 'Owopte' but, literally, it means the place from which a turnip is dug.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 220


Lady Yanina, kneeling before a pan of water, under the supervision of Rowena, who was tending the fire, was washing and scraping garden vegetables, mostly onions, turnips and suls. These would later be used in a stew.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 248





 


Tur-Pah - Turpah
To The Top


the curled, red, ovate leaves of the Tur-Pah, a tree parasite, cultivated in host orchards of Tur trees,
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 44 - 45


there was one large-trunked, reddish Tur tree, about which curled its assemblage of Tur-Pah, a vinelike tree parasite with curled, scarlet, ovate leaves, rather lovely to look upon; the leaves of the Tur-Pah incidentally are edible and figure in certain Gorean dishes, such as sullage, a kind of soup;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 217


I recall seeing, crouched against the wall of a building near the postern gate of the palace of Lurius, a coarse-robed figure, foolishly come too early to sell his vegetables, suls and turpah, near the palace.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 181


The slave boy, Fish, had emerged from the kitchen, holding over his head on a large silver platter a whole roasted tarsk, steaming and crisped, basted, shining under the torchlight, a larma in its mouth, garnished with suls and Tur-Pah.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 219


"Suls, Turpah, Vangis!" I heard a woman call, sitting amidst baskets, hawking her produce.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 314


"Release him!" cried a vendor of Tur-Pah, pushing through baskets of the vinelike vegetable.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 244


He watched with some fascination as beads of water formed on the leaves of rock-climbing Turpah, a parasitic but edible growth commonly adhering to the bark of the Tur tree.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 202 - 203


"I think the tabuk strips, the suls and turpah, the soup, all, must be ready," said Pertinax. "Let us have supper."
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 53


The taverner turned to his man. "Bring bread, and meat, suls, and tur-pah, and fruit, for our guest."
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 5


Two men passed, drawing a dock cart, laden with weights of cheese, cradled in tur-pah.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 81


"There is a large stand of Tur trees, west of the dock, near the wands, well twined with Tur-Pah," said Relia. "Men with climbing tools have freed much of it. It has been drying on racks since yesterday. Fill one basket, and no more. Deliver it to our kitchen."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 230


The ground was soft beneath my bared feet. I soon came to the racks on which Tur-Pah, harvested yesterday, had been left to dry.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 236


I knew enough of the forest within the wands to recognize many things outside them which might be eaten; leafy Tur-Pah, parasitic on Tur trees, of course,
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 243


I noted Tur-Pah clinging about nearby Tur trees. The Tur tree is tall and hardy, and the common host to Tur-Pah but Tur-Pah interestingly, does not thrive on all Tur trees. The difference apparently has to do with the grades and natures of the soil in which the tree is rooted.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 267


Too, now that I was sure I was not followed, I might look about, to assuage my hunger.
Soon, about the trunk of a tree, one of two so adorned, or afflicted, I saw, at a height I could reach, thick and coiling, a nest of Tur-Pah. I tore a length of it from the trunk about which it clung, its tiny, sharp roots anchored in the bark, and pulled away several of the heavy fleshy leaves. One would prefer Tur-Pah, certainly on a cool night, boiled in Sullage, or in some stew or even fried, salted, and honeyed, but, too, it is often, perhaps most often, eaten raw. It is the basic ingredient in most Gorean salads.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 441


I ladled the grain and vulo soup, seasoned with brown, ground tur-pah, carefully into the bowl.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 157


The contents of the trencher still steamed. It was amply laden, with strips of roast bosk, suls hot with butter, a salad of tur-pah and nuts, slices of tospit, and two large wedges of fresh bread.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 268


"You are far from the house of Decius Albus," I said.
"I have a coin," she said. "I was sent to the Teiban market, to buy tur-pah."
"May I see the coin?" I said.
"Surely," she said, holding out her hand, opened, in the palm of which lay a copper tarsk-bit, "but why?"
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 343


or a plate of cheeses, from local dairies, served with warmed bread, or prepared after the fashion of Ti, rolled in honeyed tur-pah leaves.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 401


"Tur-pah, tur-pah," called a hawker, moving amongst the wagons.
He looked at us, as one looks at slaves, but we were both secure, or, at least, as secure as a slave girl can be, in our brief tunics. We were also washed, cleaned, and combed.
Then the fellow continued on.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 614


Whereas some food had been brought from Ar in the wagon, some bread, and cold, prepared dishes, the latter for the free, more food had been bought from the shops in the caravanserai, some cubed, salted bosk, and some kes, tur-pah, and suls.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 616





 


Unleavened Bread
To The Top


In the van, after the first hour, we were unhooded and unbitted. We were given small, thick disks of what I took to be some sort of unleavened bread. "Eat," said one of our captors, who rode with us in the back of the van.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 41





 


Vangis
To The Top


"Suls, Turpah, Vangis!" I heard a woman call, sitting amidst baskets, hawking her produce.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 314


A Tarnster, come from the crowd, was passing. Near him, similarly withdrawing, was a fellow in the brown of the Peasants, a bundle of the leafy vangis over his shoulder.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 265





 


Vegetables
To The Top


Though it was apparently a market day, judging from the numerous stalls of vegetables, the racks of meat under awnings, the tubs of salted fish, the cloths and trinkets spread out on carpets before the seated, crosslegged merchants, there was none of the noisy clamor that customarily attends the Gorean market.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 67


Before we had been ushered into the cell, outside, in a broad, rectangular chamber, two of the mine attendants had poured a tub of bread and vegetables into the feed trough fixed in the wall,
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 148


It is not hard to get used to Mul-Fungus, for it has almost no taste, being an extremely bland, pale, whitish, fibrous vegetablelike matter.
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 109


From these raids the Wagon Peoples obtain a miscellany of goods which they are willing to barter to the Turians, jewels, precious metals, spices, colored table salts, harnesses and saddles for the ponderous tharlarion, furs of small river animals, tools for the field, scholarly scrolls, inks and papers, root vegetables,
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 57


I was pleased to see again, though often done in silk, the splendid varieties of caste colors of the typical Gorean city, to hear once more the cries of peddlers that I knew so well, the cake sellers, the hawkers of vegetables, the wine vendor bending under a double verrskin of his vintage.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 87


She would be hungry tonight and in the morning would have to go to the feed troughs in the quarters of the female staff slaves, probably for water and a porridge of grain and vegetables.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 89


I recall seeing, crouched against the wall of a building near the postern gate of the palace of Lurius, a coarse-robed figure, foolishly come too early to sell his vegetables, suls and turpah, near the palace.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 181


In the private pens we were given better food, lean meats and vegetables and fruits, and, if our group had trained acceptably, after the evening meal, before being returned, hooded, to the public pens, we would be given candies or pastries, or, sometimes, a swallow of Ka-la-na wine.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 163


I overheard an argument, between a seller of vegetables and two low-caste women, in simple robes of concealment.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 42


Thyri returned down the gangplank, a yoke on her shoulders, from which dangled two empty baskets, on ropes. She had been carrying tospits and vegetables to the deck locker, to fill it.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Pages 288 - 289


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


There were flasks of wine there, and bottles of the brew called paga; stores of salt, grains, dried meats and vegetables;
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 50


Scrubbing must be done, and the sewing, and the washing and ironing of clothes, and the cleaning; too, we aided in the kitchen, usually in the preparing of vegetables
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 263


I saw Bran Loort entering the tavern with a basket of vegetables. He saw me, and looked away. He went to the kitchens. He did small work at the tavern.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 412


Many goods pass in and out of Schendi, as would be the case in any major port, such as precious metals, jewels, tapestries, rugs, silks, horn and horn products, medicines, sugars and salts, scrolls, papers, inks, lumber, stone, cloth, ointments, perfumes, dried fruit, some dried fish, many root vegetables,
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 115


The results of our trading had been two baskets of dried fish, a sack of meal and vegetables, a length of bark cloth, plaited and pounded, from the pod tree, dyed red, a handful of colored, wooden beads, and, most importantly, two pangas, two-foot-long, heavy, curve-bladed bush knives.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 287


Though the cell door was locked, I was not chained, on the table was a bowl of cheap wine, some wedges of yellow bread and a wooden bowl containing vegetables and chunks of meat.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 87


"Here," I said. I crumbled the rest of the bread, which I had not eaten, which had been on the table, into her bowl, mixing it with the vegetables and meat which still remained there. "Thank you, Master," she said. She put down her head again, feeding. I smiled. The braceleted, beautiful slave was ravenous.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 94


The square was crowded. I saw market stalls and heard the cries of vendors hawking their goods. I smelled fresh vegetables and roasting meat.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 124


"Hot meat!" called another vendor. "Hot meat!"
"Fresh vegetables here!" called a woman.
"The milk of verr, the eggs of vulos!" I heard call.
Another merchant brushed past me. He was followed by a stately brunette in a brief tunic, collared, carrying a bundle on her head.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 68


The smell of fruit and vegetables, and verr milk, was strong. I also heard the chatter of women. Dozens of women were spreading their blankets, and their wares, on the cement.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 60


"Are you from a Waniyanpi compound?" I asked. The Waniyanpi, slaves of red savages, lived in tiny, isolated agricultural communities. They supplied their masters with corn and vegetables.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 131


The repast had been far more than boiled meat. It had been, in effect, a rich stew, crowded with vegetables and seasonings. Some, I knew, Winyela had begged from Grunt.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 147


"There were many vegetables in the stew," I said to Cuwignaka, pretending not to notice the intensity between Canka and Winyela. Indeed, we had had to eat much of the stew from small bowls, filled by Winyela with a kailiauk-bone ladle. Some larger pieces of vegetable and meat, we had, however, in the informal fashion of the Barrens, taken from the pot on our knives. Canka, perhaps because company was present, or because he wished to further impress her slavery upon her, had fed Winyela. This is occasionally done with a slave. It helps to remind them that they are domestic animals, and that they are dependent for their very food upon their master. I had noticed, during the meal, how she had taken food from his fingers, biting and sucking, and kissing, furtively at them. During the course of the meal she had been becoming more and more excited. Too, I had thought that Canka had given her smaller bits and pieces, and had held on to them more tightly, than was necessary to merely feed her. "That is unusual, isn't it?" I asked.

"Yes," said Cuwignaka. "That is produce, for the most part, from the fields of the Waniyanpi."

"I had thought it might be," I said. The Waniyanpi were, substantially, agricultural slaves. They farmed and gardened,
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 148


Lady Yanina, kneeling before a pan of water, under the supervision of Rowena, who was tending the fire, was washing and scraping garden vegetables, mostly onions, turnips and suls. These would later be used in a stew.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 248


She carried a pan of water. It was that in which the Lady Yanina had been washing the vegetables. The water was now rather dirty, and in it there floated numerous scrapings from various vegetables. Presumably she was on her way to empty it, outside the camp.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 249


I did not care for the gruel much, as it was tasteless and flat. I ate it, however, as it was incumbent upon me to do so. Too, I was hungry, and it was undeniably nourishing. It, like other aspects of our diet, the fruits and vegetables, and the cylindrical pellets we were given, seemed intended to slim our bodies and bring us to a peak state of health.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 66


I had had only some more bread, and a raw vegetable.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 436


"I formed the habit of going to the wall with the other women, 'fishing,' as we spoke of it. I made certain, of course, that I went to the same place on the wall at the same time each night. The first few times I put money in the basket. Later, when I increased the amount of money, I received some bread and vegetables. Can you imagine? A silver tarsk for a few suls?"
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 200


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


Then, at a sharp clapping of Mrs. Rawlinson's hands, we leapt up and hurried to the kitchen, to bring forth the fare, the sweets, the candies, the nuts, the bowls of fruit, the herbs, the bread, flat, circular loaves of bread, which would be divided into eight wedges, the many covered dishes of boiled vegetables and hot meat, the vessels of wine, and such, and placed these on the serving table from which place we began to serve the guests.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Pages 32 - 33


Jane, Eve, and I busied ourselves with the final cooking, the readying of vegetables and salads, the arrangements of vessels and dishes, the setting of places.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 632


"Sooner or later," I said, "I will be assigned away from the dock area, to root out vegetables, to pick berries, to gather firewood, something."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 201


They removed the silken covers and we noted the hampers were heaped with fruits, vegetables, cakes of rice, smoked fish, layers of dried, salted meat, and stoppered vessels which I supposed might contain sake, and perhaps, considering the continental mercenaries in the camp, none of whom had been permitted, save myself, to attend these proceedings, paga and ka-la-na.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 55


I used such occasions to deepen and broaden my knowledge of Gor, of its castes, customs, terrains and cities, governances, Ubarates, clans, beliefs, plants, fruits and vegetables, trees and flowers, animals, and such. Though I had never seen sleen, tarsks, verr, tharlarion, kaiila, tarns, or such, I did learn something of their nature, habits, and appearances.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 139


There were only the two soups, four vegetables, and two meats, roast Vosk gull and seasoned, boiled verr followed by fruit and nuts.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 160


Odors, too, emanated from the crackling pans, plates, and griddles of the cook shops. Soup, usually thick, sometimes with suls, as in sullage, but commonly comprised of other vegetables and noodles, would be ladled into wooden bowls. And there would be, too, behind the counter, in baskets, grapes, tospits, larmas, nuts, and olives, and, in blocks, cheeses, and, in its amphorae to be lifted from its racks, cheap ka-la-na.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 251


Certain streets in Ar, in certain districts, are similarly sheltered from the sun, though with vines clinging to the latticework, and then, usually, here and there are stands of fruits and vegetables lining the walls.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 525





 


Verr
To The Top


"I did not expect to see you in Turia, I said.
"Neither did the Turians," remarked Harold, reaching over the shoulder of one of the high council of Turia and taking a candied verr chop.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 253


I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted;
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 47


On the dais, with him, were several men, low tables of food, fruit, stews, tidbits of roast verr, assorted breads.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 212


Verr was roasted, and puddings made. Sa-Tarna bread was brought forth and heated. Sul paga poured freely.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 238


"Try a spiced verr cube," he suggested.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 84


"I hope they will have tarsk," said a man.
I hoped that, too, as I was growing weary of rice and parsit. The Pani do raise tarsk, verr, and, of course, vulos.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 425


There were only the two soups, four vegetables, and two meats, roast Vosk gull and seasoned, boiled verr followed by fruit and nuts.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 160


He then thrust the prong once more into the bowl, secured some three or four more slices, and slid them onto his plate, which was already laden with parsley, steamed rice, fried verr, and roast bosk.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 398





 


Verr Cheese
To The Top


Clitus, too, had brought two bottles of Ka-la-na wine, a string of eels, cheese of the Verr, and a sack of red olives from the groves of Tyros.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 114


Proteins, meat, kaiila milk, vulo eggs, verr cheese, require much water for their digestion. When water is in short supply, the nomads do not eat at all.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 226


In her hand there was a half of a yellow Gorean pear, the remains of a half moon of verr cheese imbedded in it.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 62


There was a small dairy which supplied verr milk, and processed it, as wished, into derivative products, primarily cheeses.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 164





 


Verr Milk
To The Top


Too, she taught her skills useful to a Tahari female, the making of ropes from kaiila hair, the cutting and plaiting of reins, the weaving of cloth and mats, the decoration and beading of leather goods, the use of the mortar and pestle, the use of the gram quern, the preparation and spicing of stews, the cleaning of verr and, primarily when we camped near watering holes in the vicinity of nomads, the milking of verr and kaiila. Too, she was taught the churning of milk in skin bags.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 72 - 73


She had been carrying a large bag of churned verr milk on her head.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 89


Verr are to be milked, the eggs of vulos gathered, and the sleen must be watered and fed, and their cages cleaned.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 202


Two peasants walked by, in their rough tunics, knee-length, of the white wool of the Hurt. They carried staves and grain sacks. Behind them came another of their caste, leading two milk verr which he had purchased.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 47


"Hot meat!" called another vendor. "Hot meat!"
"Fresh vegetables here!" called a woman.
"The milk of verr, the eggs of vulos!" I heard call.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 68


The smell of fruit and vegetables, and verr milk, was strong.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 60


"Verr milk, Masters!" I heard called. "Verr milk, Masters!" I opened the slats a tiny crack. I wished to see if she were pretty. She was, in her tunic and collar, kneeling on a white blanket, spread on the cement, with the brass container of verr milk, with its strap, near her, and the tiny brass cups. She was extremely lightly complexioned and had very red hair. "Verr milk, Masters," she called.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 61


There was a small dairy which supplied verr milk, and processed it, as wished, into derivative products, primarily cheeses.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 164





 


Vine Fruit
To The Top


But wines, as is well known, may be derived not only from the clustered fruits weighting the branches of the ka-la-na tree in the autumn, but, as on my former world, from vine fruit, tree fruit, bush fruit, even from some types of leaves.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 295





 


Vosk Gull
To The Top


There were only the two soups, four vegetables, and two meats, roast Vosk gull and seasoned, boiled verr followed by fruit and nuts.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 160





 


Vulo
To The Top


She had been carrying a wicker basket containing vulos, domesticated pigeons raised for eggs and meat.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 1


"And put bread over the fire," I said, "and honey, and the eggs of vulos, and fried tarsk meat and a Torian larma fruit."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 106


"Well," said Samos, chewing on a Vulo wing, "I am glad there are still some women slave in Port Kar."
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 304


I smelled roast bosk cooking, and fried vulo. It would be delicious. I thought no more of the girls.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 34


One of the girls, she toward whom I held the leg of fried vulo, reached her head toward me, opening her delicate, white teeth to bite at it.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 35


"Release their hands," I said to a seaman, "and feed them."

The girls looked at one another, wonderingly. The seaman unbound their wrists from behind their backs, and filled two trenchers, steaming now with bosk and vulo, which he thrust in their hands.

I watched them while, with fingers and teeth, they devoured the food.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 36


It stopped before Svein Blue Tooth and Ivar Forkbeard, who, on seats of rock, awaited it. Ivar, chewing on a vulo wing, motioned Hilda, and Gunnhild, Pudding and Honey Cake, who, naked and collared, his girls, knelt about him, to withdraw.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 269


A fellow walked past me, carrying several vulos, alive, heads down, their feet tied together. He was followed by another fellow, carrying a basket of eggs.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 40


I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions and honey; a kort with melted cheese and nutmeg, hot Bazi tea, sugared, and, later, Turian wine.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 47 - 48


Proteins, meat, kaiila milk, vulo eggs, verr cheese, require much water for their digestion. When water is in short supply, the nomads do not eat at all.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 226


Soon I smelled the frying of vulo eggs in a large, flat pan, and the unmistakable odor of coffee, or as the Goreans express it, black wine.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 73


He sat, cross-legged, behind the low table. On it were hot bread, yellow sugars, slices of roast bosk, the scrambled eggs of vulos, pastries with creams and custards.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 20


He was chewing on a leg of roast vulo.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 353


"It is a small dish," said the Lady Florence, "the white meat of roast vulos, prepared in a sauce of spiced Sa-Tarna and Ta wine."
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 286


"Hot meat!" called another vendor. "Hot meat!"
"Fresh vegetables here!" called a woman.
"The milk of verr, the eggs of vulos!" I heard call.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 68


I picked up a leg of vulo and bit into it.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 190


"Did Lady Sheila enjoy her spiced vulo this evening?" he asked.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 177


"No slave," said Hassan, chewing on the leg of a roasted vulo, tearing meat from it with his teeth.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 30


"Excellent vulo eggs, excellent tarsk," said Boots, his mouth full.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 211


"Thank you," I said, and sat down with them, cross-legged. It was still rather early. Soon I was helping myself to a heaping serving of vulo eggs, tarsk strips and rolls.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 212


I slowly, carefully, piled a plate high with rolls, eggs and fried vulo strips.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 213


I went to the side and removed a bowl from its padded, insulating wrap. Its contents were still warm. It was a mash of cooked vulo and rice.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 379


Some rich men bring their own cooks. After all, one cannot always count on a keeper's man knowing how to prepare Turian vulo or Kassau parsit.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 52


The vulo is a small, soft, usually white, pigeonlike bird. It is the most common form of domestic fowl kept on this world. It is prized for its meat and eggs.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 148


"I hope they will have tarsk," said a man.
I hoped that, too, as I was growing weary of rice and parsit. The Pani do raise tarsk, verr, and, of course, vulos.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 425


Many were the savory odors which emerged from behind the screen, from sauces, stews, and soups, rich with shoots, herbs, nuts, spices, vegetables, and peppers, even tarsk and vulo, as well as parsit, crabs, and grunt, emanating from pots brought in from the central kitchens, which served the long tables, outside, the barracks messes, the larger halls, and the smaller halls, such as that of the Three Moons.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 428


I had breakfasted well, on larma, vulo eggs, fried sul, roast bosk, sa-tarna, and even black wine,
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 76


"Meat is also available, Tarl Cabot tarnsman," he said. "I have seen to it. Coast gull, vulo, tarsk, verr, and mountain deer."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204


I had dined well on roast vulo, rice, and chestnuts.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 485


I ladled the grain and vulo soup, seasoned with brown, ground tur-pah, carefully into the bowl.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 157





 


Wagmeza
To The Top


They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 234





 


Wagmu
To The Top


They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 234





 


Wakapapi
To The Top


"Wakapapi," said Cuwignaka to me. This is the Kaiila word for pemmican. A soft cake of this substance was pressed into my hands. I crumbled it. In the winter, of course, such cakes can be frozen solid. One then breaks them into smaller pieces, warms them in one's hands and mouth, and eats them bit by bit. I lifted the crumbled pemmican to my mouth and ate of it. There are various ways in which pemmican may be prepared, depending primarily on what one adds into the mixture, in the way of herbs, seasonings and fruit. A common way of preparing it is as follows. Strips of kailiauk meat, thinly sliced and dried on poles in the sun, are pounded fine, almost to a powder. Crushed fruit, usually chokecherries, is then added to the meat. The whole, then, is mixed with, and fixed by, kailiauk fat, subsequently, usually, being divided into small, flattish, rounded cakes. The fruit sugars make this, in its way, a quick-energy food, while the meat, of course, supplies valuable, long-lasting stamina protein. This, like the dried meat, or jerky, from which it is made, can be eaten either raw or cooked. It is not uncommon for both to be carried in hunting or on war parties. Children will also carry it in their play. The thin slicing of the meat not only abets its preservation, effected by time, the wind and sun, but makes it impractical for flies to lay their eggs in it. Jerky and pemmican, which is usually eaten cooked in the villages, is generally boiled. In these days a trade pot or kettle is normally used. In the old days it was prepared by stone-boiling. In this technique a hole is used. This hole, dug either within the lodge or outside of it, is lined with hide and filled with water. Fire-heated stones would then be placed in the water, heating it, eventually, to boiling. As the stones cooled, of course, they would be removed from the hide pot and replaced with hot stones, the first stones meanwhile, if needed, being reheated.

"I am going to check the kaiila," said Cuwignaka. "I am going to hitch up the travois."

I nodded.

He wiped his mouth with the back of his forearm. He had been crouching near me, in the half darkness, the white dress marking his position, partaking, too, of the pemmican.

I smiled to myself. Both kaiila, one given to him by his brother, Canka, and the black kaiila, which had been mine, put at my disposal, with the permission of Canka, my master, by my friend, Grunt, the trader, were picketed but a few feet from the threshold of the lodge. Similarly the two travois, fashioned for the morning, were not more than feet away. Cuwignaka was eager.

I sat on the robes, in the half darkness, eating of the pemmican, in Canka's collar.
. . .
I sat on the robes, eating the crumbled cake of pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 46 - 47


I was thirsty from the pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 49


"Let us mount up," said Cuwignaka, swallowing down a piece of pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 239


He lay in the darkness, in Grunt's lodge. I had wished to return to this lodge. There were objects in it which remained of interest to me. In it, too, were stocks of dried meat and Wakapapi, pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 268


"We took pemmican," said the lad. "Are you going to kill us for stealing?"

"It was left for you," I said.

He extended his hand to me. In it was the small cake of pemmican which he had just seized up from the grass. "I took this, just now," he said.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 293


"She seems hungry," I said. I had noted that she was eyeing the cake of pemmican in his hand.

"Forgive me, Strawberry!" he said. "I am so thoughtless!" He quickly broke the cake of pemmican in two.

I put my hand on his arm. "You are the male," I said. "It is yours, not hers."

"I will share it with her, of course," he said.

"She has not yet begged," I said.

He looked at me, startled. Then he, in confusion, looked again upon the girl.

"I beg for something to eat," she said, smiling.

He quickly gave her half of the tiny cake of pemmican and she, on her knees, naked, swiftly, ravenously, ate it.

He then, musingly, regarding her, finished the remaining part of the cake of pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 294 - 295


"Thank you, Master," she said. She crawled toward me, on all fours, in the narrow pit. I put small pieces of pemmican in my hand. She fed from my hand. I put more pemmican in my hand. I then lowered my hand. I felt her kissing, nibbling and licking at my hand, taking the pemmican from it. I put more pemmican in my hand and then lowered it still further. I felt her hair on my body. She nibbled and kissed at my hand, delicately removing pemmican from it, her head following my hand, as I lowered it yet further, and then, with extreme delicacy, with tenderness and gentleness, she nibbled and kissed at my body. "Master desires his slave," she whispered.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 312


We then went and sat down where Mira, on leaves, had set forth our food.

We chewed the cold pemmican. We would not make a fire in this place.

From time to time, chewing, we cast a glance at Mira. She knelt to one side, her head down.

She was very beautiful. It was difficult not to anticipate the pleasures we would later receive from her.

I threw her a piece of pemmican.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 329


Cuwignaka brought some pemmican and a small water bag from a nearby lodge.
"Do you beg food, Slave Girl?" he asked Bloketu.
She looked at him. If she did not beg, she would not be fed. "Yes, Master," she said.
He then thrust pieces of pemmican at once, her meal, into her mouth, to save time.
"Chew and swallow, Slave," he said.
Bloketu obeyed.
"Do you beg drink, Slave?" asked Cuwignaka.
"Yes, Master," she said.
He then gave her a draught from the water bag. "Do you beg food, Free Woman," asked Hci.
"Yes, my captor," Said Iwoso, humbly.
He then thrust pemmican into her mouth, as Cuwignaka had with Bloketu.
"Chew and swallow, Free Woman," he said.
. . .
We divided the balance of the pemmican and water between us.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 420 - 421





 


Whale
To The Top


The men of Torvaldsland had not sought the whales. They had meat enough.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 63


The men of the country of Ax Glacier fish for whales and hunt snow sleen.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 139


Their fishing and hunting were seasonal, and depended on the animals. Sometimes they managed to secure the northern shark, sometimes even the toothed Hunjer whale or the less common Karl whale, which was a four-fluked, baleen whale.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 36


Suddenly, not more than a dozen feet from the boat, driving upward, rearing vertically, surging, expelling air in a great burst of noise, shedding icy water, in a tangle of lines and blood, burst the towering, cylindrical tonnage of the black Hunjer whale.
I hurled the harpoon.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 258


The remains of the great Hunjer whale lay beached on the shore, much of it already cut away, many bones, too, taken from it.

"The meat racks are full," I said, referring to the high racks here and there in the camp.

"Yes," said Imnak.

Two weeks ago, some ten to fifteen sleeps ago, by rare fortune, we had managed to harpoon a baleen whale, a bluish, white-spotted blunt fin. That two whales had been taken in one season was rare hunting, indeed. Sometimes two or three years pass without a whale being taken.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 265





 


White Grunt Eggs
To The Top


Before each guests there were tiny slices of tospit and larma, small pastries, and, in a tiny golden cup, with a small golden spoon, the clustered, black, tiny eggs of the white grunt.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Pages 275 - 276





 


White Wine
To The Top


The first wine, a light white wine, was being deferentially served by Pamela and Bonnie.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 276


She might have preferred a tiny glass of white wine, as she scarcely ever drank, but she did not object to his choice.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 30





 


White-Bellied Grunt
To The Top


the white-bellied grunt, a large game fish which haunts the plankton banks to feed on parsit fish.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 59





 


Wine
To The Top


Asking no questions, as was suitable given the absence of insignia on my garments, they feasted me on my own kill, and gave me fiber, and flints and a skin of wine.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 48


Surely I had enjoyed the scent of flowers and women, of hot, fresh bread, roasted meat, Paga and wines,
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 56


About Kutaituchik there were piled various goods, mostly vessels of precious metal and strings and piles of jewels; there was silk there from Tyros; silver from Thentis and Tharna; tapestries from the mills of Ar; wines from Cos;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 42


Saphrar reclined on the yellow cushions, behind the low table covered with wines, fruits and golden dishes heaped with delicate viands.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 85


There is little market in simple Laura for the more exquisite goods of Gor. Seldom will one find there Torian rolls of gold wire, interlocking cubes of silver from Tharna, rubies carved into tiny, burning panthers from Schendi, nutmegs and cloves, spikenard and peppers from the lands east of Bazi, the floral brocades, the perfumes of Tyros, the dark wines, the gorgeous, diaphanous silks of glorious Ar.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 86


Inside, in a brass pan, there was a small fire of coals. Over the coals, on a tripod, there was, warming, a small metal wine bowl. Warriors of Treve, I had heard, had a fondness for warm wines.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 274


I did not know how he cared for his wine, for some men of Treve wish it warm, others almost hot.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 332


The bottles had been of Marlenus' own stock, brought from Ar. I knew he did not, when outside of Ar, drink strange wines.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 190


It was long since I had tasted the fiery paga of the Sa-Tarna fields north of the Vosk. Now, even the wines from the vineyards of Ar seemed bitter to me.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 1


One girl held back our head, and others, from goblets, gave us of wines, Turian wine, sweet and thick, Ta wine, from the famed Ta grapes, from the terraces of Cos, wines even, Ka-la-nas, sweets and drys, from distant Ar.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 213


"Please, Master," I wheedled, "feed Dina." He put a cube of meat, boiled in wine, honeyed, in my mouth, thrusting it between my teeth and cheek with his finger.


"Hurry!" said Busebius, again appearing at the entrance to the room of preparation. We knew then the wines, and the matched breads and cheeses, were ready.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 300


A similar sort of thing is done sometimes when a master brings home a new girl to a house which is completely empty, if necessary, by prearrangement, and new to her, and orders her to enter alone. "Warm wine," he tells her. "Light the lamp of love. Spread furs. Crawl naked into them, and await me."
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 187


Though the cell door was locked, I was not chained, on the table was a bowl of cheap wine, some wedges of yellow bread and a wooden bowl containing vegetables and chunks of meat.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 87


Unbidden, she went to the shelf where I had placed the shallow, chipped clay bowl of cheap, dark wine, fit for slaves.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 98


"In the courtyard below," I said, "I was drugged."
"It was done by Tassa powder," she said.
"It was tasteless, and effective," I said.
"Slavers sometimes use it," she said. "It is well for a girl not to drink with a strange man," she laughed.
"It shows up, of course," I said, "in water."
"It is meant to be mixed with red wine," she said.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Pages 223 - 224


"And how is he rewarded?" she asked.
"An extra round of rations," said Kenneth, expansively, "some pastry upon occasion, sometimes with even a bowl of cheap wine."
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 236


The first wine, a light white wine, was being deferentially served by Pamela and Bonnie.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 276


In a Gorean supper in a house of wealth, in the course of the supper, with varied courses, eight to ten wines might be served, each suitably and congruously matched with respect to texture and bouquet not only to one another but to the accompanying portions of food.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 277


In a dinner given for his rowdy male companions, of course, in which even unmixed wines might be served,
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 106


Wine, incidentally, is often mixed with water in Gorean homes. This is primarily because of the potency of many Gorean wines. The wines I was serving, however, were such that, sensibly, they could be served undiluted. An alternative with the potent wines is to serve very small amounts of them.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 235


When wine is drunk with Gorean meals, at home, incidentally, it is almost always diluted, mixed with water in a krater. At a party or convivial supper the host, or elected feast master, usually determines the proportions of water to wine. Unmixed wine, of course, may be drunk, for example, at the parties of young men, at which might appear dancers, flute slaves and such. Many Gorean wines, it might be mentioned, if only by way of explanation, are very strong, often having an alcoholic content by volume of forty to fifty percent.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 70


Wine burst forth from the skin, onto the ankles of the large fellow, and, flowing about, seeking its paths, sank into the dirt. The dust was reddened. It was not unlike blood.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 64


"Are we to return to your compartments?" I asked. "Am I to warm wine for you?"
"Yes," he said.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 659


She might have preferred a tiny glass of white wine, as she scarcely ever drank, but she did not object to his choice.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 30


She smelled a breath thick with paga, not the red and yellow wines from the vats, the wines which she and the others carried.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 402


Sometimes the cup is first warmed at the breasts, for Goreans commonly drink wine warm, or pressed meaningfully against the slave's lower belly, the hard rim of the cup pressed inward, severely, against her yielding flesh.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 408


While some in the streets hunted urts to live, we enjoyed the most delicate of a hundred viands, the richness of a hundred rare wines.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 271


But wines, as is well known, may be derived not only from the clustered fruits weighting the branches of the ka-la-na tree in the autumn, but, as on my former world, from vine fruit, tree fruit, bush fruit, even from some types of leaves.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 295





 


Worms
To The Top


Indeed, in moments, most of the beasts of the herd, in their doltish fashion, had returned to their pursuits, as though nothing had happened, scratching for grubs and worms, digging here and there to uncover edible roots.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 513



















The Usurper
In The Usurper, the fourth installment of the Telnarian series, readers return to the saga of Otto, once a gladiator sentenced to die, now a ruthless warrior on his way to becoming king. This galaxy-spanning series features all of the excitement, combat, and erotic adventure John Norman is known for.
Available March 3, 2015

The Usurper
(The Telnarian Histories)
Click Here For Details






   
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