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Fifth Month
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5th Passage Hand
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Gorean Children



Children are definitely a part of the concept of being Gorean.
This research is provided to show what the Books say about them.
It is not meant to be anything other than the facts of the matter.
Arrive at your own conclusions.

I wish you well,
Fogaban







Click a heading to jump down to that listing.


Child and Children
Youth
Baby
Breed
Born




Supporting References

 


Child and Children
To The Top

"The caste structure," said my father patiently, with perhaps the trace of a smile on his face, "is relatively immobile, but not frozen, and depends on more than birth. For example, if a child in his schooling shows that he can raise caste, as the expression is, he is permitted to do so. But, similarly, if a child does not show the aptitude expected of his caste, whether it be, say, that of physician or warrior, he is lowered in caste."
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 42


The ancestors of some of them might have been Chaldeans or Celts or Syrians or Englishmen brought to this world over a period of centuries from different civilizations. But the children, of course, and their children eventually became simply Gorean. In the long ages on Gor almost all traces of Earth origin had vanished. Occasionally, however, an English Word in Gorean, like "ax" or "ship," would delight me. Certain other expressions seemed clearly to be of Greek or German origin.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 45


"A tarn-goad," he replied. He snapped the switch in the barrel to the "on" position and struck the table. It showered sparks in a sudden cascade of yellow light, but left the table unmarked. He turned off the goad and extended it to me. As I reached for it, he snapped it on and slapped it in my palm. A billion tiny yellow stars, like pieces of fiery needles, seemed to explode in my hand. I cried out in shock. I thrust my hand to my mouth. It had been like a sudden, severe electric charge, like the striking of a snake in my hand. I examined my hand, it was unhurt. "Be careful of a tarn-goad," said the Older Tarl. "It is not for children." I took it from him, this time being careful to take it near the leather loop, which I fastened around my wrist.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 50


The tarn continued to climb, and I saw the City of Cylinders dropping far below me, like a set of rounded children's blocks set in the gleaming green hills.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 56


We purchased a bottle of Ka-la-na wine and shared it as we walked through the streets. She begged a tenth of a tarn disk from me, and I gave it to her. Like a child she went to one or two stalls, making me look the other way. In a few minutes she returned, carrying a small package.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 133


Around his neck he wore the golden chain of the Ubar, carrying the medallionlike replica of the Home Stone of Ar. In his hands he held the Stone itself, that humble source of so much strife, bloodshed and honor. He held it gently, as though it might have been a child.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 154


Without realizing what I was doing, I had shaken the two restraining tarnsmen from my arms as if they had been children, and I rushed on Marlenus and struck him violently in the face with my fist, causing him to reel backward, his face contorted with astonishment and pain.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 157


Pa-Kur, for his part, demanded and was granted the usual savage fees imposed by the Gorean conqueror. The population would be completely disarmed. Possession of a weapon would be regarded as a capital offense. Officers in the Warrior Caste and their families were to be impaled, and in the population at large every tenth man would be executed. The thousand most beautiful women of Ar would be given as pleasure slaves to Pa-Kur, for distribution among his highest officers. Of the other free women, the healthiest and most attractive thirty percent would be auctioned to his troops in the Street of Brands, the proceeds going to the coffers of Pa-Kur. A levy of seven thousand young men would be taken to fill the depleted ranks of his siege slaves. Children under twelve would be distributed at random among the free cities of Gor. As for the slaves of Ar, they would belong to the first man who changed their collar.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Pages 188 - 189


Normally such plants are cleared from the sides of the roads and from inhabited areas. They are primarily dangerous to children and small animals, but a grown man who might lose his footing among them would not be likely to survive.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 34


One looks into the blood in one's cupped hands. It is said that if one sees one's visage black and wasted one will die of disease, if one sees oneself torn and scarlet one will die in battle, if one sees oneself old and white haired, one will die in peace and leave children.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 38


I missed the shrill, interminable calls of the vendors, each different; the good-natured banter of friends in the marketplace exchanging gossip and dinner invitations; the shouts of burly porters threading their way through the tumult; the cries of children escaped from their tutors and playing tag among the stalls; the laughter of veiled girls teasing and being teased by young men, girls purportedly on errands for their families, yet somehow finding the time to taunt the young swains of the city, if only by a flash of their dark eyes and a perhaps too casual adjustment of their veil.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 67


The balance of mutual regard is always delicate and, statistically, it is improbable that it can long be maintained throughout an entire population. Accordingly, gradually exploiting, perhaps unconsciously, the opportunities afforded by the training of children and the affections of their men, the women of Tharna improved their position considerably over the generations, also adding to their social power the economic largesse of various funds and inheritances.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Pages 205 - 206


Kron seized my arm and guided me to a table near the center of the room. Holding Lara by the hand I followed him. Her eyes were stunned but like a child's were wide with curiosity. She had not known the men of Tharna could be like this.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 224


The children of the Wagon Peoples are taught the saddle of the kaiila before they can walk.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 17


Here and there children ran between the wheels, playing with a cork ball and quiva, the object of the game being to strike the thrown ball.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 27


I was about to press Kamchak on this matter when we heard a sudden shout and the squealing of kaiila from among the wagons. I heard then the shouts of men and the cries of women and children. Kamchak lifted his head intently, listening. Then we heard the pounding of a small drum and two blasts on the horn of a bosk.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 33


Kamchak strode among the wagons, toward the sound, and I followed him closely. Many others, too, rushed to the sound, and we were jostled by armed warriors, scarred and fierce; by boys with unscarred faces, carrying the pointed sticks used often for goading the wagon bosk; by leather-clad women hurrying from the cooking pots; by wild, half-clothed children; even by enslaved Kajir-clad beauties of Turia; even the girl was there who wore but bells and collar, struggling under her burden, long dried strips of bosk meat, as wide as beams, she too hurrying to see what might be the meaning of the drum and horn, of the shouting Tuchuks.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 34


Watching us there were a few children, some men, some slave girls. As soon as Kamchak had agreed to Albrecht's proposal the children and several of the slave girls immediately began to rush toward the wagons, delightedly crying "Wager! Wager!"
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 65 - 66


In the crowd, on the back of a kaiila, I noted the girl Hereena, of the First Wagon, whom I had seen my first day in the camp of the Tuchuks, she who had almost ridden down Kamchak and myself between the wagons. She was a very exciting, vital, proud girl and the tiny golden nose ring, against her brownish skin, with her flashing black eyes, did not detract from her considerable but rather insolent beauty. She, and others like her, had been encouraged and spoiled from childhood in all their whims, unlike most other Tuchuk women, that they might be fit prizes, Kamchak had told me, in the games of Love War. Turian warriors, he told me, enjoy such women, the wild girls of the Wagons. A young man, blondish-haired with blue eyes, unscarred, bumped against the girl's stirrup in the press of the crowd. She struck him twice with the leather quirt in her hand, sharply, viciously. I could see blood on the side of his neck, where it joins the shoulder.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 67


Some two hours later we reached the encampment of the Tuchuks and made our way among the wagons and the cooking pots and playing children.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 134


The "w" sound, incidentally, is a complex one, and, like many such sounds, is best learned only during the brief years of childhood when a child's linguistic flexibility is at its maximum, those years in which it might be trained to speak any of the languages of man with native fluency a capacity which is, for most individuals at least, lost long prior to attaining their majority.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 174


I heard a child screaming its disgust at being thrust in the wagon.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 176


A woman carrying a market basket moved to one side, watching him, that she might not touch him, holding a child to her.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 7


The word actually cried was "Kaissa," which is Gorean for "Game."
. . .
even children find among their playthings the pieces of the game
. . .
It is not unusual to find even children of twelve or fourteen years who play with a depth and sophistication, a subtlety and a brilliance, that might be the envy of the chess masters of Earth.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Pages 26 - 27


I whispered in Gorean to Ho-Tu, as though I could not understand what was transpiring. "What is he doing with them?"
Ho-Tu shrugged. "He is teaching them they are slaves," he said.
"I remember the lash," said Phyllis.
"Phyllis remembers the lash," corrected Flaminius.
"I am not a child!" she cried.
"You are a slave," said Flaminius.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 131


"Once," she said, "for Kajuralia, many years ago, I was mated."
"Do you know with whom?" I asked.
"No," she said. "I was hooded." She shuddered. "He was brought in from the streets," she said. "I remember him. The tiny body, swollen. The small, clumsy hands. His whining and giggling.
The men at table laughed very loudly. It was doubtless quite amusing."
"What of the child?" I asked.
"I bore it," she said, "but, once more hooded, I never saw it. It was surely, considering its sire, a monster." She shuddered.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 253


I fell down several times but the cart did not stop; each time I managed to regain my feet, though sometimes I was dragged for several yards before, nearly strangling, I managed to get up once more. Twice children tripped me; at least twice one of the guards with the butt of his spear did so. They laughed.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 283


The crowd was stirring in the stands. The caste colors of Gor seemed turbulent in the high tiers. Men rushed here and there securing the clay disks confirming their bets. Hawkers cried their wares. Here and there children ran about. The sky was a clear blue, dotted by clouds. The sun was shining. It was a good day for the races.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 361


Some of the riders of the Steels, I recalled, seeing it among the belongings of Gladius of Cos, had jested with me about it, asking if it were a toy, or perhaps a training bow for a child; these men, of course, had never, on kaiilaback, and it is just as well for them, met Tuchuks.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 366


There were tears in the eyes of those about me, and my own eyes were not dry as well.
I heard a child ask his father, "Father, who is that man?"
"He is Marlenus," said the father. "He has come home. He is Ubar of Ar."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 377


My ankles had been unbound only long enough to push me stumbling from the rush craft, among the shouting women and men and children, to the throne of Ho-Hak.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 14


Over her shoulder were slung the four birds she had caught in the marshes, their necks were now broken and they were tied together, two in front and two over her back. There were other women about as well, and here and there, peering between the adults I could see children.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 16


I did not even much care that I might spend the rest of my life as an abject slave, abused on a rence island, the sport of a girl or children, the butt of cruelty and jests of men.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 30


The smaller children played together, the boys playing games with small nets and reed marsh spears, the girls with rence dolls, or some of the older ones sporting with throwing sticks, competing against one another.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 41


There were children about the periphery of the circles but many of them were already asleep on the rence.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 43


The bantering of the young people in the morning, and the display of the girls in the evening, for in effect in the movements of the dance every woman is nude, have both, I expect, institutional roles to play in the life of the rence growers, significant roles analogous to the roles of dating, display and courtship in the more civilized environments of my native world, Earth.
It marks the end of a childhood when a girl is first sent to the circle.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 46


Everywhere about us there were shouting men, screaming women, running, crying children, and everywhere, it seemed, the men of Port Kar, and their slaves, holding torches aloft, burning like the eyes of predators in the marsh night. A boy ran past. It was he who had given me a piece of rence cake in the morning, when I had been bound at the pole, who had been punished by his mother for so doing.
Raiders of Gor   Book 6   Page 53


I took the child in my arms and walked down to the shore of the rence island.
I looked westward, the direction that had been taken by the heavily laden barges of the slavers of Port Kar. I kissed the child.
"Did you know him?" asked Telima.
I threw the body into the marsh.
"Yes," I said. "He was once kind to me."
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 66


"Is that why you have saved them, from the men of Port Kar?"
I looked at her in fury.
"There was a child," I said, "one who was once kind to me."
"You have done all this," she asked, "because a child was once kind to you?"
"Yes," I said.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 82


"The child," she said, "is bound. It is in pain. It is doubtless thirsty and hungry."
I turned and made my way to the second barge. I found the child, a boy, perhaps of five years of age, blond like many of the rencers, and blue-eyed. I cut him free, and took him in my arms.
I found his mother and cut her free, telling her to feed the child and give water to it.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 83


The men shouted. Women cursed, and screamed their hatred of the panther girls. Children cried out and pelted them with pebbles. Slave girls in the crowd rushed forward to surge about the carts, to poke at them with sticks, strike them with switches and spit upon them.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 213


There must have been two hundred or more peasants, men, children and women, all shouting, and beating on their kettles or pans. The women and children carried sticks and switches, the men spears, flails, forks and clubs.
They were too close together, there were too many of them!
A child saw me and he cried out and began to beat more loudly on his pan.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 249


Women and children, too, in the dusty square crowded about. I heard some clanging of pans. I saw sticks in the hands of some of the children.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 253


It could perhaps be mentioned that such work, cooking, cleaning and laundering, and such, is commonly regarded as being beneath even free women, particularly those of high caste. In the high cylinders, in Gorean cities, there are often public slaves who tend the central kitchens in cylinders, care for the children, but may not instruct them, and, for a tiny fee to the city, clean compartments and do laundering.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 317


There was little sugar in the forest, save naturally in certain berries, and simple hard candies, such as a child might buy in shops in Ar, or Ko-ro-ba, were, among the panther girls in the remote forests, prized.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 31


Men, and women and children, were lining the side street, and others were pouring in from the street before the tavern.
We heard the beating of a drum and the playing of flutes.
"What is going on?" I asked a fellow, of the metal workers.
"It is a judicial enslavement," he said.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 48


That he had once played a man such as Scormus of Ar or Centius of Cos is the sort of thing that a Gorean grandfather will boast of to his grandchildren.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 148


. . . lastly, they should make greater appeal to women than they do, for, in most Gorean cities, women, of one sort or another, care for and instruct the children in the crucial first years. That would be the time to imprint them, while innocent and trusting, at the mother's or nurse's knee, with superstitions which might, in simpler brains, subtly control then the length of their lives. So simple an adjustment as the promise of eternal life to women who behaved in accordance with their teachings, instructing the young and so on, might have much effect. But the initiates, like many Gorean castes, were tradition bound.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 30


I looked into the hungry eyes of a child, clinging in a sack to its mother's back. She kept nodding her head in prayer.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 33


When the war arrow is carried, of course, all free men are to respond; in such a case the farm may suffer, and his companion and children know great hardship; in leaving his family, the farmer, weapons upon his shoulder, speaks simply to them. "The war arrow has been carried to my house," he tells them.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 142


. . . the tiny, six-toed rock tharlarion of southern Torvaldsland, favored for their legs and tails, which are speared by children.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 152


It seemed first a ghastly infection, a plague; then it seemed like a fire, invisible and consuming; then it seemed like the touching of these men by the hands of gods, but no gods I knew, none to whom a woman or child might dare pray, but the gods of men, and of the men of Torvaldsland, the dread, harsh divinities of the cruel north, the gods of Torvaldsland.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 247


Some of the peppers and spices, relished even by children in the Tahari districts, were sufficient to convince an average good fellow of Thentis or Ar that the roof of his mouth and his tongue were being torn out of his head.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 46


Once she stole a date. I did not whip her. I chained her, arms over her head, back against the trunk, to a flahdah tree. I permitted nomad children to discomfit her. They are fiendish little beggars. They tickled her with the lanceolate leaves of the tree. They put honey about her, to attract the tiny black sand flies, which infest such water holes in the spring.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 81


When she had left the room she had used the runner at the side of the room. Rooms in private dwellings, in the Tahari, if rich, usually are floored with costly rugs. The rooms are seldom crossed directly, in order to prevent undue wear on the rugs; long strips of ruglike material line the edges of the room; these are commonly used in moving from room to room; children, servants, slaves, women, commonly negotiate the rooms by keeping on the runners, near the walls. Men commonly do also, if guests are not present.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 157


The children of nomads, both male and female, until they are five or six years of age, wear no clothing. During the day they do not venture from the shade of the tents. At night, as the sun goes down, they emerge happily from the tents and romp and play. They are taught written Taharic by their mothers, who draw the characters in the sand, during the day, in the shade of the tents. Most of the nomads in this area were Tashid, which is a tribe vassal to the Aretai. It might be of interest to note that children of the nomads are suckled for some eighteen months, which is nearly twice the normal length of time for Earth infants, and half again the normal time for Gorean infants. These children, if it is significant, are almost, uniformly secure in their families, sturdy, outspoken and serf-reliant. Among the nomads, interestingly, an adult will always listen to a child. He is of the tribe. Another habit of nomads, or of nomad mothers, is to frequently bathe small children, even if it is only with a cloth and a cup of water. There is a very low infant mortality rate among nomads, in spite of their limited diet and harsh environment.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 170 - 171


To indicate the greater significance of the evening meal, as compared to the other Gorean meals, no slave girl may touch it without first having been given permission, assuming that a free man or woman, even a child, is present.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 74


Normally mating takes place among caste members, but if the mating is of mixed caste, the woman may elect to retain caste, which is commonly done, or be received into the caste of the male companion. Caste membership of the children born of such a union is a function of the caste of the father.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 213


Gorean culture tends to view the body, its development, its appetites and needs, with congeniality. We do not grow excited about the growth of trees, and Goreans do not grow excited about the growth of people. In some respects the Goreans are, perhaps, cruel. Yet they have never seen fit, through lies, to inflict suffering on children. They seem generally to me to be fond of children. Perhaps that is why they seldom hurt them. Even slave children, incidentally, are seldom abused or treated poorly, and are given much freedom, until they reach their young adulthood. It is then, of course, that they are taught that they are slaves. Men come, and the young male is tied and taken to the market. If the young slave is a female she may or may not be sent to a market. Many young slave maidens are raised almost as daughters in a home. It is often a startling and frightening day for such a girl when, one morning, she finds herself suddenly, unexpectedly, put in a collar and whipped, and made to begin to pay the price of her now-blossomed slave beauty.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 155


Sometimes a girl, winning love, is freed, perhaps to bear the children of a former master.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 235


I did know the red hunters were extremely permissive with their children, even among Goreans. They very seldom scolded them and would almost never strike a child. They protected them as they could. Soon enough the children would learn. Until that time let them be children.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 266


Most families in Port Kar own their own boats. These boats are generally shallow-drafted, narrow and single-oared, the one oar being used to both propel and guide the boat. Even children use these boats.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 61


Any person on the street, seeing us, would know what we were. Even children would know us as mere slaves, for, categorically, and legally, that is what we would be.
Rogue of Gor     Book 15     Page 212


In a family house, of course, girls are almost always modestly garbed. Children of many houses might be startled if they could see the transformation which takes place in their pretty Didi or Lale, whom they know as their nurse, governess and playmate, when she is, in their absence or after their bedtime, ordered to the chamber of one of the young masters, there to dance lasciviously before him, and then to be had, and as a slave.
Guardsmen of Gor     Book 16     Page 106


The children that we passed in the streets, playing at marbles or stone toss, scarcely glanced up. Two children, however, one boy and one girl, did run and strike the slave. She started, and squirmed, on my shoulder under the blows.
I did not admonish the children. First, it was nothing to me that they had struck her, for she was a slave. Secondly, they were free persons, and free persons on Gor may do much what they please. It is slaves who must be careful of their behavior, lest free persons find it displeasing. The boy who had struck her, I believe, had been in a fit of ill temper. I think he had just lost at stone toss.
The girl, on the other hand, I think, had had far different motivations. She had not been involved in the game, but had only been watching it. Yet she had struck the slave by far the cruelest blow. Already she had learned, as a free woman, that female slaves are to be despised and beaten.
Guardsmen of Gor     Book 16     Page 197


A child is often put on kaiilaback, its tiny hands clutching the silken neck, before it can walk.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 47


"You, yourself," I said, "do not seem much infected by the lunacy of the Waniyanpi."
"No," she said. "I am not. I have had red masters. From them I have learned new truths. Too, I was taken from the community at an early age."
"How old were you?" I asked.
"I was taken from the enclosure when I was eight years old," she said, "taken home by a Kaiila warrior as a pretty little white slave for his ten-year-old son. I learned early to please and placate men."
"What happened?" I asked.
"There is little more to tell," she said. "For seven years I was the slave of my young master. He was kind to me, and protected me, muchly, from the other children. Although I was only his slave, I think he liked me. He did not put me in a leg stretcher until I was fifteen."
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 236


Some of these rode kaiila to which travois were attached. Some had cradles slung about the pommels of their saddles. These cradles, most of them, are essentially wooden frames on which are fixed leather, open-fronted enclosures, opened and closed by lacings, for the infant. The wooden frame projects both above and below the enclosure for the infant. In particular it contains two sharpened projections at the top, like picket spikes, extending several inches above the point where the baby's head will be located. This is to protect the infant's head in the event of the cradle falling, say, from the back of a running kaiila. Such a cradle will often, in such a case, literally stick upside down in the earth. The child, then, laced in the enclosure, protected and supported by it, is seldom injured.
Such cradles, too, vertical, are often hung from a lodge pole or in the branches of a tree. In the tree, of course, the wind, in its rocking motion, can lull the infant to sleep. Older children often ride on the skins stretched between travois poles. Sometimes their fathers or mothers carry them before them, on the kaiila. When a child is about six, if his family is well-fixed, he will commonly have his own kaiila. The red savage, particularly the males, will usually be a skilled rider by the age of seven. Bareback riding, incidentally, is common in war and the hunt. In trading and visiting, interestingly, saddles are commonly used. This is perhaps because they can be decorated lavishly, adding to one's appearance, and may serve, in virtue of the pommel, primarily, as a support for provisions, gifts and trade articles.
"It is simply splendid," said Cuwignaka, happily.
"Yes," I said.
Children, too, I noted, those not in cradles, greased, their hair braided, their bodies and clothing ornamented, in splendid finery, like miniature versions of the adults, some riding, some sitting on the skins stretched between travois poles, participated happily and proudly, or bewilderedly, in this handsome procession.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 26


From the lodges near the edge of the escarpment men again drew forth travois. On these were great bundles of arrows, hundreds of arrows in a bundle. Many of these arrows were not fine arrows. Many lacked even points and were little more than featherless, sharpened sticks. Yet, impelled with force from the small, fierce bows of the red savages at short range, they, too, would be dangerous. For days warriors, and women and children, had been making them.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 415


The people of Corcyrus, it was clear, had welcomed the men of from Ar, as liberators. The colors of Argentum and of Ar, on ribbons and strips of cloth, angled from windows and festooned, even being stretched between windows and rooftops overhead, the triumphal way. Such colors, too, were prominent in the crowd, on garments being waved, fluttering, by citizens and sometimes even children, perched on the shoulders of adults.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 189


"We wish you well, noble captain," said Chino, shaking Petrucchio's hand, warmly. "I do not think we shall soon forget our chance encounter with the great Captain Petrucchio."
"That is for certain," said Lecchio.
"Few do," Petrucchio admitted.
"May we have your permission to tell our children and our grandchildren about this?" inquired Chino.
"Yes," said Petrucchio.
"Thank you," said Chino.
"It is nothing," said Petrucchio, as though it might really have been nothing, the bestowal of so priceless a right.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 315


Then Genserix reached down and lifted up the child. The women cried out with pleasure and the men grunted with approval. Genserix held the child up now, happily, it almost lost in his large hands, and then he lifted it up high over his head.
"Ho!" called the warriors, standing up, rejoicing.
The women beamed.
"It is a son!" cried one of the women.
"Yes," said Genserix. "It is a son!"
"Ho!" called the warriors. "Ho!"
"What is going on?" asked Feiqa.
"The child has been examined," I said. "It has been found sound. It will be permitted to live. It is now an Alar. Too, he has lifted the child up. In this he acknowledges it as his own."
Genserix then handed the child to one of the warriors. He then drew his knife.
"What is he going to do?" gasped Feiqa.
"Be quiet," I said.
Genserix then, carefully, made two incisions in the face of the infant, obliquely, one on each cheek. The infant began to cry. Blood ran down the sides of its face, about the sides of its neck and onto its tiny shoulders. "Let it be taken now," said Genserix, "to its mother."
The woman who had brought the child to the side of the fire now took up the blanket in which it had been wrapped, and, wrapping it again in its folds, took it then from the warrior, and made her way back to the wagon.
"These are a warrior people," I said to Feiqa, "and the child is an Alar. It must learn to endure wounds before it receives the nourishment of milk."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 46 - 47


Feiqa was kneeling before a boy, perhaps some eleven or twelve years of age. His face was dirty. He was barefoot, and in rags. I assumed he must live in the rooms somewhere. Feiqa, a full-grown and beautiful female, but a slave, put down her head and, doing him obeisance, kissed his feet, and fearfully, and humbly. He was a free person, and a male.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 277


Twice some children addressed themselves to the coffle, jeering its captives, spitting upon them, stinging them with hurled pebbles, rushing forward, even, to lash at them with switches. Already, it seemed, to these children, the women were no more than mere slaves.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 162


At other times there was the laughter of children, running, sporting in games, games which might be common, I suppose, to children anywhere. Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 37


I did see one child. I would have had to kneel before it, as before any free person. It regarded us idly. It had apparently seen many women such as I, so conducted.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 162


"He is afraid to go to the surface," she said, "in spite of his intelligence, and his great strength, for there even children mock and ridicule him. It is better that he is here."
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 300


Children squirmed in and out among the people.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 416


I supposed the captives in their march must endure scrutiny from men, and abuse from free women. Too, children can be very cruel, running out with switches, pelting them with pebbles, and such. This is not prevented for these captives are, in a sense, women of the enemy, and, in any event, will soon become mere slaves.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 454


I saw a child, with a ball, running toward the balustrade.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 475


At other times there was the laughter of children, running, sporting in games, games which might be common, I suppose, to children anywhere.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 37


I did see one child. I would have had to kneel before it, as before any free person. It regarded us idly. It had apparently seen many women such as I, so conducted.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 162


"Is the pit master truly human?" I asked.
"Of course," she said. "He cannot help that he was born as he was."
I looked down.
"He is afraid to go to the surface," she said, "in spite of his intelligence, and his great strength, for there even children mock and ridicule him. It is better that he is here."
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 300


More than a hundred and fifty tarns had landed in the docking area. Guards held the crowds back. Loot was being unloaded. There was music in the docking area, adding to the celebration. In the city, to my right, the bars, which normally signify times and alarms, were sounding in jubilation.
"See! See!" cried men in the crowd.
Vessels of gold were lifted by raiders, displaying them to the crowd.
Children squirmed in and out among the people.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 416


I supposed the captives in their march must endure scrutiny from men, and abuse from free women. Too, children can be very cruel, running out with switches, pelting them with pebbles, and such. This is not prevented for these captives are, in a sense, women of the enemy, and, in any event, will soon become mere slaves.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 454


"They're coming this way!" said a fellow.
"Go," said a man to a free woman. "Leave! Get indoors! Get off the terrace!"
I saw a child, with a ball, running toward the balustrade.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 475


I saw then another group brought forth from a building. It was smaller than the first group. Perhaps it had been cut off in one of the buildings, a rear entrance sealed. With this group, of some twenty or thirty individuals, including some children, I glimpsed the bared legs and arms of some tunicked slaves, at least five or six of them.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 481


Some children ran through the crowd. A vendor was pursuing them.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 230


In the morning, shortly after they had been brought in coffle to the surface of the shelf, thence to be chained as before to various rings, a boy, surely no more than ten or eleven years old, had come to stand before the shelf.
She was in first position, or in something rather like it, rather near the front edge of the shelf, the chain attached to her shackle ring trailing behind her to its ring.
The boy continued to stare at her.
"Go away, little boy," she said, irritatedly. "This place is not for you."
"Split your knees, slave girl," said he to her.
"What?" she said, in disbelief.
He repeated his instruction, granting that she might not have heard him properly.
"Never," she said, "you little urt." She drew her legs together and covered her breasts with her hands.
"What is going on here?" asked Barzak, approaching. His whip, on its staff ring, blades folded back, and clipped, against the staff, which is long enough to be held with both hands, was at his belt.
"Nothing," said the boy.
"'Nothing'!" said Ellen. "This little urt was looking at me. He told me to split my knees!"
"And you did not do so?"
"Certainly not!" cried Ellen.
Barzak looked at her, sternly.
"He is only a little boy!" she said.
"He is a free person," said Barzak.
"Master?" asked Ellen.
"Are you a slave girl?"
"Yes, Master!"
"And you have failed to obey a free person?"
"He is a little boy!" she cried.
"So you have failed to obey a free person," he said.
"Yes, Master," she whispered.
"Don't whip me, please!" she cried, seeing Barzak loosen the whip, removing the staff ring from the hook at his belt, and unclipping the blades.
"It's nothing," said the boy. "Do not whip her. I do not want her whipped. She is probably just stupid."
"First obeisance position," snapped Barzak. "Beg his forgiveness!"
Instantly Ellen went to the first obeisance position, head down, palms of her hands on the cement. "Please forgive me, Master," she begged, frightened.
"Kneel up, first position," said Barzak.
Ellen went to first position, with all its revelatory delights.
"Split your knees, slave girl," said the boy.
"They are split, Master," said Ellen.
"Split them much more widely, slave girl," said the boy.
"Yes, Master," said Ellen.
"Turn to the side, as you are, kneeling, put your hands on the cement behind you," said the boy, "lean back, arch your back, have your head back, farther."
"Yes, Master," said Ellen.
"She has a nice line," said the boy.
"Yes," said Barzak. "She is a pretty she-urt."
"You may break position," said the boy.
Quickly Ellen knelt up, and turned to face him, closing her knees, covering her breasts with her hands.
Barzak wandered off.
"I am only eleven," said the boy. "You are too old for me. I would prefer a slave who is nine or ten."
He then turned about and disappeared into the crowd.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Pages 254 - 255


Later a small girl had drifted to the front of the shelf. She was clad in a child's version of the Robes of Concealment. The tips of purple slippers could be seen beneath the hem of the robes. She was veiled. Her head, forehead and hair were covered, too, as is common. Ellen could see her dark brown eyes, wide, looking at her, over the white veil. Ellen and the others were in first position. A woman, similarly attired, with robes and veil, presumably her mother, hurried up to her and seized her by the hand, pulling her forcibly away. "Don't look at those terrible, nasty, dirty things in their collars and chains!" she scolded.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Pages 255 - 256


She knelt there for a time, bewildered, lost in the darkness of the hood, helpless in her confusion. Suddenly it seemed to her that there was some security lost in the removal of the clumsy, heavy collar and the shackle. None of the other slaves spoke to her, perhaps because there were men about, but she did not know if that were the case or not.
Then she felt herself lifted from the shelf, presumably by Barzak, and placed on her feet, on the stones of the market place, doubtless before the shelf.
"Look, Mother," she heard a child say.
"Come away," said a woman's voice.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 286


In the Gorean theory, as slaves are animals, they may be managed by any free person, or, indeed, any designated slave. Sometimes they are put under the supervision of a boy or girl who is no more than a child. And, of course, the least bit of resistance, recalcitrance or such may invoke severe discipline, even death. Behind the children, and the lads, you see, stand men.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 398


One time, however, several days ago, he did strip her, tie her wrists together before her body and conduct her down the stairs to the hall of the building, where it opened at the street level. Two children, and, later, a free woman, were passed on the stairs. None paid her attention.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 697


There is a technique, incidentally, based on a variation of the stabilization serums, for hastening physical maturation, but this is little used because one has then to show for one's pains only an unusual child. Much can be done with the body, it seems, but little with the mind, saving, perhaps, by Priest-Kings in the recesses of the Sardar. Gorean men are not interested in children, even if they have the bodies of women. They find them uninteresting. Nor will they be of interest until several years have passed. Then they may be interesting, perhaps quite interesting. Humanity, one notes, exceeds physiology. Unfortunately, too, several of these children will suffer confusing stress, as they lack the emotional maturation to relate comprehensibly to the needs and demands of their grown bodies, bodies hastened beyond the horizons of a child's understanding. Accordingly, this application of the stabilization serums is frowned upon in Gorean society, and in many cities is illegal.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 30 - 31


"Games are for children," he said.
"Kaissa is not for children," I said. Life and death sometimes hung on the outcomes of a kaissa match, and war or peace. Cities had been lost in such matches, and slaves frequently changed hands.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 93

The saru is a small, usually arboreal animal. It is usually regarded with amusement, or contempt. It figures in children's stories as a cute, curious, mischievous little beast, but also one that is stupid, vain, and ignorant. Although the saru, as far as I can tell, is not a monkey zoologically, it surely occupies a similar ecological niche, and resembles the monkey in its diet, habits, groupings, and such. It is tailless. I think it would not be amiss to think of the saru as a Gorean monkey.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 230


Freedom, obviously, is not an absolute value, as only fools could believe. Freedom for what is an obvious consideration. Children should not be permitted to romp on the high bridges.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 247


The coffle, interestingly, was accompanied by Pani youth, of the lesser sort, with switches. As I understand it, something similar is often done amongst the Red Savages of the Barrens, namely, that adult white females are placed in the charge of boys. In this way, controlled and herded as the animals they are, they are taught that they are inferior even to the children of their masters.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 372


My throat, too, was parched. I had been raised in luxury and power. I had wanted for nothing. Never had I been hungry and thirsty like this. Even as a child I had had serving slaves.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 62


Who, at one time, would have dared to think of striking Talena, Ubara of Ar?
Now, a slave, she was subject to the whip of a child.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 377


The Pani free women, incidentally, seem, except for the companions of high officers, and such, to have much lower status than the typical Gorean free woman, certainly one of upper caste. For example, an older sister, even a mother, must defer to a male child, bowing first, and such.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 405


Needless to say, all members of my caste, even from childhood, are taught to read.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 516


Usually, in slave breeding, both the male and female slave are chained in a breeding stall, and hooded, that neither may know the other. The breeding takes place under the supervision of masters, or their agents, and the slaves, of course, are forbidden to speak to one another. If the breeding is successful, the mother is hooded during labor, and never sees the child, which is taken from her, to be tended, and cared for, elsewhere.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 525


"I am educated," I said.
"How many breeds of kaiila are there?" asked a slave.
"I do not know," I said.
"When do talenders bloom?" asked another.
"I do not know," I said.
"How many eggs does the Vosk gull lay?"
"I do not know," I said.
"Children know such things," said a slave.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 199


I thought it might be the eighth Ahn, but was less than sure. Gorean children would be more adept at such estimations than I. They are taught to estimate the time of day by the position of Tor-tu-Gor, Light- Upon-the-Home-Stone, rather as they are taught to recognize fruits and blossoms, trees and flowers, and a thousand small things within their environment, things which children of my world seldom notice, and in which they are seldom interested.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 241


There are some free women of the upper castes, wealthy women, who from childhood have never dressed themselves, who do not even know the intricate clasps and closures of the robes of concealment they wear, let alone their blendings and drapings, the best colors for the time of day and the season, the arrangements ideally in order for receivings, visitings, promenades, attendance at the readings, the theater, the song drama and so on.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 312


Some thieves are trained in this skill from childhood.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 199


"Being served by such women," said Kurik, "adds a piquant sauce to the food. Too, it is pleasant to consider their feelings, as they now, as degraded, abject, meaningless slaves, must serve those who, from childhood, they have been taught to despise and regard as inferiors."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 649





 


Youth
To The Top

It was said a youth of the Wagon Peoples was taught the bow, the quiva and the lance before their parents would consent to give him a name, for names are precious among the Wagon Peoples, as among Goreans in general, and they are not to be wasted on someone who is likely to die, one who cannot well handle the weapons of the hunt and war. Until the youth has mastered the bow, the quiva and the lance he is simply known as the first, or the second, and so on, son of such and such a father.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 11


"Young warrior," asked Hassan, of a youth, no more than eight, "have you heard aught of a tower of steel?"
His sister, standing behind him, laughed. Verr moved about them, brushing against their legs.
The boy went to the kaiila of Alyena. "Dismount, Slave," he said to her.
She did so and knelt before him, a free male. The boy's sister crowded behind him. Verr bleated.
"Put back your hood and strip yourself to the waist," said the boy.
Alyena shook loose her hair; she then dropped her cloak back, and removed her blouse.
"See how white she is!" said the nomad girl.
"Pull down your skirt," said the boy.
Alyena, furious, did so, it lying over her calves.
"How white!" said the nomad girl.
The boy walked about her, and took her hair in his hands. "Look," said he to his sister, "silky, fine and yellow, and long." She, too, felt the hair. The boy then walked before Alyena. "Look up," said he. Alyena lifted her eyes, regarding him. "See," said he to his sister, bending down. "She has blue eyes!"
"She is white, and ugly," said the girl, standing up, backing off.
"No," said the boy, "she is pretty."
"If you like white girls," said his sister.
"Is she expensive?" asked the boy of Hassan.
"Yes," said Hassan, "young warrior. Do you wish to bid for her?"
"My father will not yet let me own a girl," said the youngster.
"Ah," said Hassan, understanding.
"But when I grow up," said he. "I shall become a raider, like you, and have ten such girls. When I see one I want, I will carry her away, and make her my slave." He looked at Hassan. "They will serve me well, and make me happy."
"She is ugly," said the boy's sister. "Her body is white."
"Is she a good slave?" asked the boy of Hassan.
"She is a stupid, miserable girl," said Hassan, "who must be often beaten."
"Too bad," said the boy.
"Tend the verr," said his sister, unpleasantly.
"If you were mine," said the boy to Alyena, "I would tolerate no nonsense from you. I would make you be a perfect slave."
"Yes, Master," said Alyena, stripped before him, her teeth gritted.
"You may clothe yourself," said the boy.
"Thank you, Master," said Alyena.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 171 - 172


Goreans seldom have cavities. I am not certain what the reasons for this are. In part it is doubtless a matter of a plainer, simpler diet, containing less sugar; in part, I suspect, the culture, too, may have a role to play, as it is a culture in which undue chemical stress, through guilt and worry, is not placed on the system either in the prepubertal or pubertal years. Gorean youth, like the youth of Earth, encounter their difficulties in growing up but the culture, or cultures, have not seen fit to implicitly condition them into regarding the inevitable effects of maturation as either suspect, deplorable or insidious.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 27


Young men and women of the city, when coming of age, participate in a ceremony which involves the swearing of oaths, and the sharing of bread, fire and salt. In this ceremony the Home Stone of the city is held by each young person and kissed. Only then are the laurel wreath and the mantle of citizenship conferred. This is a moment no young person of Ar forgets. The youth of Earth have no Home Stone. Citizenship, interestingly, in most Gorean cities is conferred only upon the coming of age, and only after certain examinations are passed. Further, the youth of Gor, in most cities, must be vouched for by citizens of the city, not related in blood to him, and be questioned before a committee of citizens, intent upon determining his worthiness or lack thereof to take the Home Stone of the city as his own. Citizenship in most Gorean communities is not something accrued in virtue of the accident of birth but earned in virtue of intent and application. The sharing of a Home Stone is no light thing in a Gorean city.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 394


The youth of Tharna is usually bred from women temporarily freed for purposes of their conception, then reenslaved. In Tharnan law a person conceived by a free person on a free person is considered to be a free person, even if they are later carried and borne by a slave. In many other cities this is different, the usual case being that the offspring of a slave is a slave, and belongs to the mother's owner. The education, however, of the Tharnan youth differs on a sexual basis. The boys are raised to be men, and masters, and the girls to be women, and slaves. The boys, as a portion of the Home Stone Ceremony, take an oath of mastery, in which they swear never to surrender the dominance which is rightfully theirs by nature. It is in this ceremony, also, that they receive the two yellow cords commonly worn in the belt of a male Tharnan. These cords, each about eighteen inches long, are suitable for the binding of a female, hand and foot. In the same ceremony the young women of Tharna are also brought into the presence of the Home Stone. They, however, are not permitted to kiss or touch it. Then, in its presence they are stripped and collared.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 267


A surrogate stone was subsequently used for the ceremony of citizenship. Certain youth refused then to participate in the ceremony and certain others, refusing to touch the surrogate stone, uttered the responses and pledges while facing northwest, toward Cos, toward their Home Stone.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 163


Indeed, a good portion of the civilian militia had been composed of such fellows, and youth, many not old enough to know how to handle a weapon.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 242


"Surely I am too old for you, youthful Masters," said Ellen, quickly.
"You are not much older than we," said one of the lads.
Ellen supposed that that was true, but two or three years, in a female, made quite a difference. These were young males, little more than youngsters, who could scarcely grow beards, whereas she, perhaps no more than two or three years older, as she now was, was prime block material.
"It would be hard to keep her just for ourselves, as our secret," said the first lad. "We could keep her in the forest, chained to a tree, or in our hideout cave, but sooner or later someone would suspect, or find her. If we take her back to the village, they will take her away from us."
"Then we must sell her," said the second. "And keep the money for ourselves."
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 362


To be sure, although the men of Gor tend to be larger and stronger than the men of Earth, I am sure the primary differences between them are largely cultural. Doubtless on Earth, somehow, despite all, there are true men, masters, and rare and precious they must be, but such are abundant, indeed, almost universal, on Gor. A Gorean youth, for example, is early accustomed to the care and management, the training and disciplining, the hooding, binding, chaining, and such, of female slaves. There are even games, held within large low-walled enclosures, with spectators in attendance, in which lads compete, each hunting another lad's slave, she doing her best to elude capture, that her own master may score more highly than her pursuer. These contests are timed. A given lad's time is determined by how long it takes to capture his fair quarry, bind it helplessly, hand and foot, and hurl it, futilely thrashing, squirming and struggling, to the sand before the judges. Any girl of whom it is suspected that she did not do her best to elude capture is whipped.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 713





 


Baby
To The Top

A woman, veiled, passed me. She held a baby inside her cloak, nursing it.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 41


The first word that an Earth baby learns is usually, "No." The first word that a Gorean baby learns is commonly, "Yes."
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 37


Some of these rode kaiila to which travois were attached. Some had cradles slung about the pommels of their saddles. These cradles, most of them, are essentially wooden frames on which are fixed leather, open-fronted enclosures, opened and closed by lacings, for the infant. The wooden frame projects both above and below the enclosure for the infant. In particular it contains two sharpened projections at the top, like picket spikes, extending several inches above the point where the baby's head will be located. This is to protect the infant's head in the event of the cradle falling, say, from the back of a running kaiila. Such a cradle will often, in such a case, literally stick upside down in the earth. The child, then, laced in the enclosure, protected and supported by it, is seldom injured.
Such cradles, too, vertical, are often hung from a lodge pole or in the branches of a tree. In the tree, of course, the wind, in its rocking motion, can lull the infant to sleep. Older children often ride on the skins stretched between travois poles. Sometimes their fathers or mothers carry them before them, on the kaiila. When a child is about six, if his family is well-fixed, he will commonly have his own kaiila. The red savage, particularly the males, will usually be a skilled rider by the age of seven.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 26


The tiny baby, not minutes old, with tiny gasps and coughs, still startled and distressed with the sharp, frightful novelty of breathing air, never again to return to the shelter of its mother's body, lost in a chaos of sensation, its eyes not focused, unable scarcely to turn its head from side to side, lay before him. The cord had been cut and tied at its belly. Its tiny legs and arms moved. The blood, the membranes and fluids, had been wiped from its small, hot, red, firm body. Then it had been rubbed with animal fat. How tiny were its head and fingers. How startling and wonderful it seemed that such a thing should be alive. Genserix looked at it for a time, and then he turned it over, and examined it further. Then he put it again on its back. He then stood up, and looked down upon it.
The warriors about the fire, and the woman, and two other women, too, who had now come from the wagon, looked at him.
Then Genserix reached down and lifted up the child. The women cried out with pleasure and the men grunted with approval. Genserix held the child up now, happily, it almost lost in his large hands, and then he lifted it up high over his head.
"Ho!" called the warriors, standing up, rejoicing.
The women beamed.
"It is a son!" cried one of the women.
"Yes," said Genserix. "It is a son!"
"Ho!" called the warriors. "Ho!"
"What is going on?" asked Feiqa.
"The child has been examined," I said. "It has been found sound. It will be permitted to live. It is now an Alar. Too, he has lifted the child up. In this he acknowledges it as his own."
Genserix then handed the child to one of the warriors. He then drew his knife.
"What is he going to do?" gasped Feiqa.
"Be quiet," I said.
Genserix then, carefully, made two incisions in the face of the infant, obliquely, one on each cheek. The infant began to cry. Blood ran down the sides of its face, about the sides of its neck and onto its tiny shoulders. "Let it be taken now," said Genserix, "to its mother." The woman who had brought the child to the side of the fire now took up the blanket in which it had been wrapped, and, wrapping it again in its folds, took it then from the warrior, and made her way back to the wagon.
"These are a warrior people," I said to Feiqa, "and the child is an Alar. It must learn to endure wounds before it receives the nourishment of milk."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 46 - 47





 


Breed
To The Top

To a slaver, certain girls can be recognized at a glance, as being of certain varieties developed by certain houses. The primary goals of the program, of course, wherever found, are beauty and passion. On the other hand, considering the large number of slaves on Gor, only a small fraction are carefully bred; a larger fraction is bred, but more haphazardly, as when a given male of one private house is mated, for a price, with a given female of another house. Often in these matters, conducted under supervision, both slaves are hooded, in order that they not know who it is with whom they are forced to mate, lest they might, in their moment of union, in their common degradation, care for one another, or fall in love. The largest number of slaves, however larger than the bred slaves, considered as a group, are those who have been born free and have fallen into slavery, a not uncommon fate on this cruel, warlike world, particularly for women.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 110


if the Forkbeard wished to breed her she would bear healthy, strong young to his thralls, enriching his farms;
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 125


Men seldom breed upon their slave girls. Female slaves, when bred, are commonly hooded and crossed with a male slave, similarly hooded, the breeding conducted under the supervision of their respective owners; a girl is seldom bred with a slave from her own house; personal relationships between male and female slaves are usually frowned upon; sometimes, however, as a discipline even a high female slave is sometimes thrown to a chain of work slaves for their pleasure. The effect of the slave wine endures several cycles, or moons; it may be counteracted by another drink, a smooth, sweet beverage, which frees the girl's body for the act of the male slave, or, in unusual cases, should she be freed, to the act of the lover; slave girls, incidentally, are almost never freed on Gor; they are too delicious and desirable to free; only a fool, it is commonly said, would free one.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 69 - 70


Many girls dream of being sold in the Curulean. Its great block is perhaps the most famous in Ar. It is also the largest. It is semi-circular and some forty feet in width. It is painted for the most part in blue and yellow, the colors of the slavers, and ornately carved, with many intricate patterns and projections. It is perhaps fifteen feet high. An interesting feature of the block is that about it, on the semi-circular side facing the crowd, tall and serene, carved in white-painted wood, evenly spaced, are the figures of nine slave girls. They represent, supposedly, the first nine girls taken, thousands of years ago, by the men of a small village, called Ar. In the carving it may be seen that the throats of the girls are encircled by ropelike collars, presumably woven of some vegetable substance. It is said that at that time the men of Ar were not familiar with the working of iron. It is also said the girls were forced to breed mighty sons for their captors.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 428


"If there is to be breeding done upon them, I will, of course, supervise it," she said.
"Of course, Lady Florence," said Kenneth.
Slaves are domestic stock. They are bred if and when, and as, the masters please.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 237


Most Gorean slave girls are comely, or beautiful. This is easy to understand. It is almost always the better looking women who are taken for slaves, and, of course, in breeding slaves, it is commonly only the most beautiful of female slaves who are used, these usually being crossed, hooded, with handsome male silk slaves, also hooded. The female offspring of these matings, needless to say, are often exquisite. The male offspring, incidentally, and interestingly, to my mind, are often handsome, strong and quite masculine. This is perhaps because many male silk slaves are chosen to be male silk slaves not because they are weak or like women, but because they are not; it is only that they are men, and often true men, who must serve women, totally, in the same fashion that a slave female is expected to serve a free master. To be sure, it is also true, and should be admitted in all honesty, that many male silk slaves are rather feminine; some women prefer this type, perhaps because they fear true men; from such a silk slave they need not fear that they may suddenly be turned upon, and tied, and taught to be women. Most women, however, after a time, find this type of silk slave a banality and a bore; charm and wit can be entertaining, but, in time, if not conjoined with intellect and true masculine power, they are likely to wear thin.
The feminine type of male silk slave, incidentally, for better or for worse, is seldom selected for breeding purposes. Gorean slave breeders, perhaps benighted in this respect, prefer what they take to be health to what they think of as sickness, and what they take to be strength to what they deem weakness. Some female slaves, incidentally, have a pedigreed lineage going back through several generations of slave matings, and their masters hold the papers to prove this. It is a felony in Gorean law to forge or falsify such papers. Many Goreans believe that all women are born for the collar, and that a woman cannot be truly fulfilled as a woman until a strong man puts it on her, until she finds herself reduced to her basic femaleness at his feet.
In the case of the bred female slave, of course, she has been legally and literally, in anyone's understanding, bred to the collar, and in a, full commercial and economic sense, as a business speculation on the part of masters. The features most often selected for by the breeders are beauty and passion. It has been found that intelligence, of a feminine sort, as opposed to the pseudo-masculine type of intelligence often found in women with large amounts of male hormones, is commonly linked, apparently genetically, with these two hitherto mentioned properties. There are few male slaves with long pedigrees. Goreans, though recognizing the legal and economic legitimacy of male slavery, do not regard it as possessing the same biological sanction as attaches to female slavery. The natural situation, in the mind of many Goreans, is that the master set / slave relation is one which ideally exists between man and woman, with the woman in the property position. Male slaves, from time to time, can receive opportunities to win their freedom, though, to be sure, usually in situations of high risk and great danger. Such opportunities are never accorded to the female slave. She is totally helpless. If she is to receive her freedom it will be fully and totally, and only, by the decision of her master.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 68 - 70


She did not need the sip root, of course, for, as she had pointed out, she had had some within the moon, and, indeed, the effect of sip root, in the raw state, in most women, is three or four moons. In the concentrated state, as in slave wine, developed by the caste of physicians, the effect is almost indefinite, usually requiring a releaser for its remission, usually administered, to a slave, in what is called the breeding wine, or the "second wine." When this is administered she usually knows that she has been selected for crossing with a handsome male slave.
Such breedings commonly take place with the slaves hooded, and under the supervision of the master, or masters. In this way the occurrence of the breeding act can be confirmed and authenticated. Sometimes a member of the caste of scribes is also present, to provide certification on behalf of the city. Usually, however, in cities which encourage this sort of registration it is sufficient to bring the papers for stamping to the proper office within forty Ahn. Such rigor, however, is usually involved only in the breeding of expensive, pedigreed slaves. Most slave breeding is at the discretion of the private master or masters involved. Slaves from the same household, incidentally, are seldom mated. This practice is intended to reduce the likelihood of intimate emotional relationships among slaves. Furthermore, male and female slaves are usually kept separate, female slaves commonly performing light labors in households and male slaves working in the fields or on the grounds. Sometimes, to reward male slaves, or keep them content, or even to keep them from going insane, a female slave is thrown to them. This is sometimes a girl of delicate sensibilities from the house who has not been perfectly pleasing; she then finds herself thrown naked to work slaves. In slave matings, since most crossings do not take place within the same household, a stud fee is usually paid to the master of the male slave. The active ingredient in the breeding wine, or the "second wine," is a derivative of teslik. In the matter of bitterness of taste there is little to choose from between raw sip root and slave wine, the emulsive qualities of the slave wine being offset to some extent by the strength of the concentrations involved.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 319 - 320


"She was a comely wench, as I determined, when I saw her naked," he said. "She was curvaceous, and, when she realized I would not compromise with her, moved quite well. She herself, I am sure, under a suitable master, would have made excellent collar meat. She would also make, it seemed to me, an excellent breeder of slaves."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 303


When the girl is taken to the breeding cell or breeding stall, she is normally hooded. Her selected mate is also hooded. In this fashion personal attachments are precluded. She is not there to know in whose arms she lies, or piteously, and in misery, to fall in love, but to be impregnated. And in accord with the prescribed anonymity of the breeding, as would be expected, the slaves do not speak to one another. They may be slain if they do. Their coupling is public, of course, in the sense that the master, or usually, masters, and sometimes others, whether in an official capacity or not, are present, to make any pertinent payments or determinations.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 175


"But such was not for such as I," she said. "I had no wish to risk being hooded and chained in a crossing stall in Tyros, being used to breed quarry slaves for Chenbar, the Sea Sleen." I rather doubted that she, who was slight, delicious and well-curved, would have to fear that fate. Too, most women would spend very little time in a crossing stall. How long, after all, she placed there without slave wine, at the exactly ideal moment in her breeding cycle, does it take to impregnate a slave? Most such slaves are used in this fashion only once or twice, and then they are assigned other duties.
Renegades of Gor     Book 23     Page 200


The breeding of slaves, like that of most domestic animals, is carefully supervised. Slave breeding usually takes place in silence, at least as far as speech is concerned. Similarly the slaves are normally hooded. They are not to know one another. This is thought useful in reducing, or precluding, certain possible emotional complications. The breeding takes place under the supervision of masters, or their agents, with endorsements being recorded on proper papers.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 189


"Sometimes, in rural areas," he said, "there is a breeding festival, and slaves from miles about, hooded and bound, carefully selected, of course, on leashes behind wagons, in crates, and so on, are brought to the breeding grounds.
He could breed me, she thought.
"It is a time of much feasting and merriment," he said, "much like a fair."
He could literally breed me, she thought. I wonder if he will breed me.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 80


Some Goreans breed slaves, of course. This is commonly done by agreement amongst masters. There are, too, of course, the slave farms. Some members of the caste of physicians, incidentally, concern themselves with such matters, for example, by implanting fertilized eggs in host mothers. In this way, a prize slave may be used to produce numerous offspring. The same thing is done routinely with other domestic animals. On the whole, however, this is rare with Gorean humans, who tend to be traditional in such matters and accordingly are inclined to refrain from such practices.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 27


The effects of slave wine are counteracted by a drink called a 'Releaser'. If you are administered such a potion, you may expect, shortly thereafter, to be hooded and conducted to a breeding stall."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 62


"The breeding of slaves is supervised," she said, "as is the case with other domestic animals."
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 70





 


Born
To The Top

"I was born free," she said. "You must understand that. I am not a bred slave."
"I understand," I said. "Perhaps," I suggested, "your mother was not only beautiful, but proud and brave and fine."
"How could that be?" laughed Vika scornfully. "I have told you she was only a bred slave, an animal from the pens of Ar."
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 69






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