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Passage Hand
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Year 10,172 Contasta Ar


Vegetables



Here are relevant references from the Books where vegetables are mentioned.
I make no pronouncements on these matters, but report them as I find them.
Arrive at your own conclusions.

I wish you well,
Fogaban



     Bean
          Bean - Black Wine
     Cabbage
     Carrots
     Corn
     Garlic
     Katch
     Kort
     Maize
     Mushroom
     Onion
     Peas
     Potato
     Produce
     Pumpkin
     Radish
     Squash
     Sul
          Brown
          Golden
          Reddish
          Tiny
          Wild
     Turnip
     Tur-Pah
     Wagmeza
     Wagmu
 


Beans
To The Top


Initiates do not eat meat, or beans.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 26


Incidentally, it is a teaching of the initiates that only initiates can obtain eternal life. The regimen for doing this has something to do with learning mathematics, and with avoiding the impurities of meat and beans.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 29


I saw too, fields, fenced with rocks, in the sloping area. In them were growing, small at this season, shafts of Sa-Tarna; too, there would be peas, and beans, cabbages and onions, and patches of the golden sul, capable of surviving at this latitude.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded. At the oasis, because of the warm climate, the farmers can grow two or more crops a year.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


"This is warmed chocolate," I said, pleased. It was very rich and creamy.

"Yes, Mistress," said the girl.

"It is very good," I said.

"Thank you, Mistress," she said.

"Is it from Earth?" I asked.

"Not directly," she said. "Many things here, of course, ultimately have an Earth origin. It is not improbable that the beans from which the first cacao trees on this world were grown were brought from Earth."

"Do the trees grow near here?" I asked.

"No, Mistress," she said. "We obtain the beans, from which the chocolate is made, from Cosian merchants, who, in turn, obtain them in the tropics."
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 61


A free woman drew back her robes, hastily, frightened, lest they touch an Initiate. It is forbidden for Initiates to touch women, and, of course, for women to touch them. Initiates also avoid meat and beans.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 17


I stopped for a moment to watch an amusing race. Several slave girls are aligned, on all fours, poised, their heads down. Then, carefully, a line of beans, one to a girl, is placed before them. She must then, on all fours, push the bean before her, touching it only with her nose. The finish line was a few yards away.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 38


"I would have thought," said Marcus, "that Ar might have rejoiced these days to obtain even the services of a lad with a beanshooter."
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 71


It is not only women, incidentally, which are forsworn by Initiates but also, interestingly, beans.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 430


The Initiates, in virtue of the study of mathematics, the adoption of various abstinences, such as the eschewing of beans,
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 8


Perhaps some Peasants might buy them, to hoe suls, to pick beans, to swill tarsks, to draw the plow, to warm their feet in the winter.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 376


"On such a boor, and barbarian," she said, "the bean garden of a peasant would be wasted."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 207


The awesomeness of the caste of Initiates is further enhanced by the fact that they refrain from sex, devote themselves to mathematical studies, and eschew meat and beans.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 433





 


Bush - Black Wine
To The Top


"Actually," I said to Elizabeth, "this is very rare. Thentis does not trade the beans for black wine. I have heard of a cup of black wine in Ar, some years ago, selling for a silver eighty-piece. Even in Thentis black wine is used commonly only in High Caste homes."

"Perhaps it is from Earth?" she asked.

"Originally, doubtless beans were brought from Earth," I said, "much as certain other seeds, and silk worms and such, but I doubt very much that the ship I saw last night had in its cargo anything as trivial as the beans for black wine."
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 107


Soon I smelled the frying of vulo eggs in a large, flat pan, and the unmistakable odor of coffee, or as the Goreans express it, black wine. The beans grow largely on the slopes of the Thentis mountains. The original beans, I suppose, had been brought, like certain other Gorean products, from Earth; it is not impossible, of course, that the opposite is the case, that black wine is native to Gor and that the origin of Earth's coffee beans is Gorean; I regard this as unlikely, however, because black wine is far more common on Earth than on Gor, where it is, except for the city of Thentis, a city famed for her tarn flocks, and her surrounding villages, a somewhat rare and unusual luxury.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 73


In Thentis, for example, sleen are used to smell out contraband, in the form of the unauthorized egress of the beans for black wine from the Thentian territories.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 186 - 187


I grinned, and washed down the eggs with a swig of hot black wine, prepared from the beans grown upon the slopes of the Thentis mountains.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 21


Black wine, except in the vicinity of Thentis, where most of it is grown on the slopes of the Thentis range, is quite expensive.
Guardsman of Gor     Book 16     Page 245


and even black wine, the beans for which, I supposed, derived from the far slopes of the Thentis mountains, and may have been brought west at some risk.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 76


Many are the markets of Gor, and some are supplied by contraband merchandise, of dubious origins, and evasive of taxes and harbor fees, such as rogue silver from the mines of Tharna, to be exported to Cos and Tyros, and the Farther Islands, even to the World's End; the beans from which Black-Wine is brewed, so carefully guarded by those of Thentis, famed for its tarn flocks, to be shipped as far south as Schendi, as far north as Torvaldsland;
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 243


Steaming black wine, with its trays of sugars and creams, one of which I bore, and liqueurs, some apparently from as far away as Turia, were being served.

Black wine is expensive.

The plants from which its seeds are obtained apparently grow favorably, perhaps even most favorably, on the slopes of the Thentis Mountains, an area under the jurisdiction of the mountain city of Thentis. The trade in black wine is closely controlled by the so-called "vintners" of Thentis. For example, it is forbidden to take viable black-wine seeds or plants from the vicinity of Thentis. And, as one would suppose, the sale of the roasted seeds from which the black wine is brewed is carefully supervised and regulated. Doubtless some smuggling occurs. Where such plants are found, illegitimately planted, at least from the point of view of the Thentis "vintners," they are uprooted and destroyed. Similarly, smugglers, if apprehended, are often dealt with harshly, by impalement, or servitude in the mines, quarries, or galleys. This policing is commonly done by representatives of the "vintners" of Thentis, but it is sometimes hired out to the caste of Assassins, which constitutes the nearest thing to an international police force on Gor, a force subject neither to the constraints of walls, borders, or Home Stones. Most public eating establishments cannot afford to serve black wine. There are several cases where a female slave has been exchanged for a cup of the beverage. Needless to say, the serving of this beverage at our small collation, or feast, was an indication of the formidable wealth, and widely ranging connections, of Decius Albus, trade advisor to the Ubar of Ar, a man named Marlenus. Whereas the plants from which the seeds, or beans, for black wine are brewed may have been native to Gor, I rather suspected that their world of origin might have lain far away, perhaps on another world.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Pages 403 - 404





 


Cabbage
To The Top


I saw too, fields, fenced with rocks, in the sloping area. In them were growing, small at this season, shafts of Sa-Tarna; too, there would be peas, and beans, cabbages and onions, and patches of the golden sul, capable of surviving at this latitude.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81





 


Carrots
To The Top


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded. At the oasis, because of the warm climate, the farmers can grow two or more crops a year.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37





 


Corn
To The Top


"Many of the tribes permit small agricultural communities to exist within their domains," she said. "The individuals in these communities are bound to the son and owned collectively by the tribes within whose lands they are permitted to live. They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 233 - 234


"Are you from a Waniyanpi compound?" I asked. The Waniyanpi, slaves of red savages, lived in tiny, isolated agricultural communities. They supplied their masters with corn and vegetables.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 131





 


Garlic
To The Top


"I have peas and turnips, garlic and onions in my hut," said the man, his bundle like a giant's hump on his back.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 29


I could smell his breath, heavy with drink, and garlic, and herbs, across the furs.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 312





 


Katch
To The Top


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded. At the oasis, because of the warm climate, the farmers can grow two or more crops a year.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37





 


Kort
To The Top


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded. At the oasis, because of the warm climate, the farmers can grow two or more crops a year.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


I detected the odor of kort rinds, matted, drying, on the stones, where they had been scattered from my supper the evening before.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 115





 


Maize
To The Top


They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 234


The reason that Waniyanpi breeding takes place in a maize field, incidentally, seems to he that, in the medicine beliefs of the red savages, the example of their breeding is supposed to encourage the maize to flourish.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 157


"Surely you have frightened fleer from the maize, gardened and picked produce," I said.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 165


We then, the grass to our waist, dragging the travois on which Hci lay, and other articles, surmounted a rise, surveying the maize fields below us, the buildings and palisade of the compound beyond them.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 277


I scanned the skies. "Let us get out of the open," I said. "Let us go to the maize, near the platform."
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 278


Approaching, along the side of the maize field, coming from the direction of the palisade and buildings in the distance was a group of Waniyanpi.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 279


"Where is the other lance?" Pumpkin asked Carrot. "Hidden, near the edge of the maize field," said Carrot.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 358


'Natu' designates corn silk, or the tassel on the maize plant; it can also stand for the hair on the side of the head.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 471


The best translation is perhaps "Red Tassel," the tassel being understood as that of the maize plant, prized by the red savages.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 472


Seibar was offering a netted sack of maize.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 473


Yet the rent for the tenancy had been set at one ear of maize per year, to be delivered to the reigning chieftain of the Isbu Kaiila. Yesterday this ear of maize had been delivered, with suitable ceremonies, to Mahpiyasapa.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 473





 


Mushrooms
To The Top


"I am an Alar," Hurtha explained. "Have a stuffed mushroom."

I pondered the likely prices of a stuffed mushroom in a black-market transaction in a war-torn district, one turned into a near desert by the predations of organized foragers, in particular, the price of such a mushroom perhaps diverted at great hazard from the tables of Cosian generals.

"Have two," said Hurtha.

My heart suddenly began to beat with great alarm. "This is a great deal of food," I said, "to have been purchased by seventeen copper tarsks, and two tarsk bits." That was, as I recalled, the sum total of the monetary wealth which Hurtha had brought with him to the supply train, that or something much in its neighborhood.

"Oh," said Hurtha, "it cost more than that."

"I had thought it might," I said.

"Have a mushroom," said Hurtha. "They are quite good."

"What did all this cost?" I asked.

"I do not recall," said Hurtha. "But half of the change is yours."

"How much change do you have?" I asked.

"Fourteen copper tarsks," he said.

"You may keep them," I said.

"Very well," he said.

"I am quite hungry, Hurtha," said Boabissia. "May I have some food?"

"Would you like to beg?" he asked.

"No," she said.

"Oh, very well," said Hurtha. He then held out to her the plate of mushrooms. It did not seem to me that she needed to take that many. "Ah, Mincon, my friend, my dear fellow," said Hurtha. "Come, join us?"

I supposed he, too, would dive into the mushrooms. Still, one could not begrudge dear Mincon some greed in this matter, for he was a fine driver, and a splendid fellow. We had been with him now four days on the road. To be sure, we had received a late start on each of these days, and each day later than the preceding. It was difficult to get an early start with slaves such as Tula and Feiqa in the blankets. Boabissia, a free woman, must wait for us, of course, while we pleasured ourselves with the slaves. I think she did not much enjoy this. At any rate, she occasionally seemed somewhat impatient. Too, her irritability suggested that her own needs, and rather cruelly, might quite possibly be upon her.

Feiqa and Tula, those lovely properties, hovered in the background. I supposed that they, too, would want to be fed. I dared not speculate at what time we might be leaving in the morning. I hoped we could arouse Mincon and Hurtha at least by noon. There was even paga and ka-la-na. Mincon began to pick mushrooms off the plate and feed them to Tula. Did he not know she was a slave? "Thank you, Master," she said, being fed by hand. Sometimes slaves are not permitted to touch food with their own hands. Sometimes, in such a case, they are fed by hand; at other times their food might be thrown to them or put out for them in pans, and such, from which then, not using their hands, on all fours, head down, they must feed, in the manner of she-quadrupeds, or slaves, if it be the master's pleasure. Another mushroom disappeared. Had Tula not had some bread earlier?

"Have a mushroom," said Hurtha.

Mincon even gave a mushroom to Feiqa. I was watching. He was certainly a generous fellow with those mushrooms.

"No, thank you," I said. I wondered if, in the eating of such a mushroom, one became an inadvertent accomplice in some heinous misadventure.

"They are good," Hurtha insisted.

"I am sure they are," I said. I was particularly fond of stuffed mushrooms.

There was no problem for the slaves, of course. No one would blame them, any more than one would blame a pet sleen for eating something thrown his way.

Mincon and Boabissia might get off, I thought, watching them eat. After all, they did not know where the food came from. Mincon was a trusted driver, and a well-known good fellow. Boabissia was fresh from the wagons. She might be forgiven. Too, she was pretty. Hurtha, of course, might be impaled. I wondered if I counted as being guilty in this business whether I ate a mushroom or not. I knew where they came from, for example. It would be too bad to be impaled, I thought, and not have had a mushroom, at all. "What are they stuffed with?" I asked Hurtha.

"Sausage," he said.

"Tarsk?" I asked.

"Of course," he said.

"My favorite," I said. "I shall have one."

"Alas," said Hurtha. "They are all gone."

"Oh," I said. "Say," I said, "there seems to be a fellow lurking over there, by the wagons."

Hurtha turned about, looking.

It was undoubtedly a supply officer. I supposed it would be wrong to put a knife between his ribs. I did, however, for at least a moment, feverishly consider the practicalities that might be involved in doing so.

"Ho!" cried Hurtha, cheerfully, to the fellow.

The fellow, who was a bit portly, shrank back, as though in alarm, near one of the wagons. Perhaps he was not a supply officer. He did not have a dozen guardsmen at his back, for instance.

"Do you know him?" I asked.

"Of course," said Hurtha. "He is my benefactor!"

I looked again.

"Come," called Hurtha, cheerily. "Join us! Welcome!" I feared the fellow was about to take to his heels.

"I am sorry the mushrooms are all gone," said Hurtha to me.

"That is all right," I said.

"Try a spiced verr cube," he suggested.

"Perhaps later," I said, uneasily. The portly fellow near the wagon had not approached, nor either had he left. He seemed to be signaling me, or attempting to attract my attention. But perhaps that was my imagination. When Hurtha glanced about he did not, certainly, seem to be doing so. I did not know him, as far as I knew.

"They are very good," said Hurtha, "though, to be sure, they are not a match for the stuffed mushrooms."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 81 - 84


"You asked her a question, beloved daughter," said Lord Yamada. "She responded as best she could. Dismiss her. Permit her to continue serving." He then addressed the other diners. "Note the kelp, the bamboo shoots, the fish, the lotus roots, and mushrooms."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 204





 


Onions
To The Top


"I have peas and turnips, garlic and onions in my hut," said the man, his bundle like a giant's hump on his back.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 29


He trust an onion and a crust of bread into my hands. "Take this," he said.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 148


"Dorna the Proud," said the slave, who tumbled onions, turnips, radishes, potatoes and bread into the feed trough.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 155


I did not much care for the crusts, and the onions and peas, on which we fed, but I did not expect to be eating them long.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 183


I and the others, from our pans, were eating one of our four daily rations of bread, onions and peas. We were passing a water skin about among us.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 184


I put down my pan of bread, onions and peas, sliding it under the bench. I might want it later.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 185


I reached under my rowing bench. There, dented, its contents half spilled, itself floating in an inch or two of sea found my pan of bread, onions and peas.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 188


Their food is that of a galley slave, peas, black bread and onions.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 304


I saw too, fields, fenced with rocks, in the sloping area. In them were growing, small at this season, shafts of Sa-Tarna; too, there would be peas, and beans, cabbages and onions, and patches of the golden sul, capable of surviving at this latitude.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded. At the oasis, because of the warm climate, the farmers can grow two or more crops a year.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


I had, had verr meat, cut in chunks and threaded on a metal rod, with slices of peppers and larma, and roasted; vulo stew with raisins, nuts, onions
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 47


It was a grim fate which awaited them, the confinement and pain of the benches, the weight of the long oars, the shackles, the whip, the drum of the hortator, the stench, the black bread and onions of the ponderous galleys.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 342


Lady Yanina, kneeling before a pan of water, under the supervision of Rowena, who was tending the fire, was washing and scraping garden vegetables, mostly onions, turnips and suls. These would later be used in a stew.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 248





 


Peas
To The Top


"I have peas and turnips, garlic and onions in my hut," said the man, his bundle like a giant's hump on his back.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 29


After a bit of cold bosk, some water and a handful of peas, I had come the House of Cernus.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 40


"Point for both," announced the man-at-arms.

The food at the table of Cernus was good, but it was plain, rather severe, like the master of the House. I had tarsk meat and yellow bread with honey, Gorean peas and a tankard of diluted Ka-la-na, warm water mixed with wine.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 87


The Tarn Keeper, who was called by those in the tavern Mip, bought the food, bosk steak and yellow bread, peas and Torian olives,
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 168


I did not much care for the crusts, and the onions and peas, on which we fed, but I did not expect to be eating them long.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 183


I and the others, from our pans, were eating one of our four daily rations of bread, onions and peas.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 184


The great merchant galleys of Port Kar, and Cos, and Tyros, and other maritime powers, utilized thousands of such miserable wretches, fed on brews of peas and black bread,
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 13


Their food is that of a galley slave, peas, black bread and onions.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 304


I saw too, fields, fenced with rocks, in the sloping area. In them were growing, small at this season, shafts of Sa-Tarna; too, there would be peas, and beans, cabbages and onions, and patches of the golden sul, capable of surviving at this latitude.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81





 


Potatoes
To The Top


"Dorna the Proud," said the slave, who tumbled onions, turnips, radishes, potatoes and bread into the feed trough.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 155





 


Produce
To The Top


I looked at the four new wagons which had been added to the retinue. The wagon which I had seen earlier, the supply wagon, was now almost empty, the food supplies perhaps being diminished as the peregrination neared its end, and the poles and tenting, of course, being used in the sheltering for the camp. The other four wagons, however, were fully loaded, largely, it seemed, with produce and coarse goods.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 110 - 111


It is not unusual for a Gorean city to have several villages in its vicinity, these customarily supplying it with meat and produce. These villages may or may not be tributary to the city. It is common, of course, for a city to protect those villages, whether they are tributary to the city or not, which make use of its market. If a village markets in a given city, that city, by Gorean custom, stands as its shield, a relationship which, of course, works to the advantage of both the villages and city, the city receiving produce in its markets, the villages receiving the protection of the city's soldiers.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 111 - 112


The Betrothal or Companion Journey, ceremonially, included the circuit of the four villages, in each of which a feast was held, and from each of which a wagon of produce was procured, to be added to the dowry fiches to be presented to Ebullius Gaius Cassius, father of Thandar of Ti, to be included in the treasury of Ti. I had seen four wagons of produce in the camp, and knew independently from Eta, that the four tributary villages had now been visited. The wagons of produce were not of great value but stood as token of the relation of the villages to Fortress of Saphronicus.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 112


I heard a second wagon being driven from the camp. I thought it might be one of the produce wagons, but, as it later turned out, the treasure freight of the dowry wagon had been divided between two wagons, the produce in one discarded, to lighten the load and make driving swifter.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 129


"Many of the tribes permit small agricultural communities to exist within their domains," she said. "The individuals in these communities are bound to the son and owned collectively by the tribes within whose lands they are permitted to live. They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 233 - 234


"There were many vegetables in the stew," I said to Cuwignaka, pretending not to notice the intensity between Canka and Winyela. Indeed, we had had to eat much of the stew from small bowls, filled by Winyela with a kailiauk-bone ladle. Some larger pieces of vegetable and meat, we had, however, in the informal fashion of the Barrens, taken from the pot on our knives. Canka, perhaps because company was present, or because he wished to further impress her slavery upon her, had fed Winyela. This is occasionally done with a slave. It helps to remind them that they are domestic animals, and that they are dependent for their very food upon their master. I had noticed, during the meal, how she had taken food from his fingers, biting and sucking, and kissing, furtively at them. During the course of the meal she had been becoming more and more excited. Too, I had thought that Canka had given her smaller bits and pieces, and had held on to them more tightly, than was necessary to merely feed her. "That is unusual, isn't it?" I asked.

"Yes," said Cuwignaka. "That is produce, for the most part, from the fields of the Waniyanpi."

"I had thought it might be," I said. The Waniyanpi were, substantially, agricultural slaves. They farmed and gardened, and did other work for their red masters. "Were men sent forth to the compounds to fetch the produce?" I asked.

"The Waniyanpi have delivered it," said Cuwignaka. "It is done that way when it is the great camp which is in question."

"I see," I said. During the feasting times, those generally correlated with the coming of the kailiauk, the locations of the great camps of the various tribes were well known. This made feasible the delivery of produce, something which would be correspondingly impractical most of the year, when the tribes had separated into scattered bands, and sometimes even smaller units, with temporary, shifting camps. "Are there Waniyanpi now in camp?" I asked.

"Yes," said Cuwignaka, "but they will be leaving soon."

"How soon?" I asked.

"I do not know," said Cuwignaka.

"I met some Waniyanpi," I said. "They were from a place they referred to as 'Garden Eleven.' I wonder if those in camp would be from there."
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 148 - 149


"We do not," said Pumpkin. "We came afoot, dragging travois, laden with our produce, in the charge of a boy."
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 153


"Surely you have frightened fleer from the maize, gardened and picked produce," I said.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 165


No longer must those who had been Waniyanpi content themselves with the consumption of their own produce and deliver surpluses without recompense into the hands of masters.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 473


"Suls, Turpah, Vangis!" I heard a woman call, sitting amidst baskets, hawking her produce.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 314


Doubtless many times she would have held herself a thousand times superior to the poor peasant women, coming in from the villages, in their bleached woolen robes, bringing their sacks and baskets of grain and produce to the city's markets.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 19 - 20


"I thought you could find no roots." I smiled.

"Some were left in the garden," she said. "I remembered them. I came back for them. There was very little left though. Others obviously had come before me. These things were missed. They are poor stuff. We used to use the produce of that garden for tarsk feed."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 22


"Many folks come to the wagons, as you know, informers, slavers, tradesmen, metal workers, craftsmen, peasants who will barter produce for skins and trinkets, and so on.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Pages 47 - 48


We were in a roadside camp, eleven days from Torcadino. It was not a bad camp. There was shade, and a spring nearby. Peasants came there to sell produce.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 227


The tenth Ahn was the Gorean noon. The square would be crowded at that time. To be sure, it is crowded in different ways at different times, during the day. In the morning the peasants come in from the countryside and spread out their blankets, and arrange their baskets of produce.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 278


Whereas they welcome currently lower prices on produce and greater assurances of its variety and quantifies, they also tend to regret the withdrawal or loss of the local peasantry, which provided them not only with a plethora of individual suppliers, tending to generate a free market, complex and competitive, but also with a sphere of intelligence and even defense about the city. An organization of great farms, acting in concert, of course, could reduce competition, and eventually regulate prices rather as they pleased, particularly with regard to staples such as Sa-Tarna and Suls. Accordingly some cities have been willing to offer inducements to farmers to remain in their vicinity, such as a liberalization of the requirements for citizenship, the performance of rural sacrifices, the holding of games in rural areas, subsidizing the touring of theatrical and musical troupes in the countryside, special holidays honoring the agricultural caste, which may be celebrated in the city, and so on. In many cases, these inducements appear to have been effective. The farmer likes to be appreciated, and to have the importance and value of his work recognized. He thinks of his caste as "the ox on which the Home Stone rests." Too, of course, he generally prefers to stay where he is. He is fond of the land he knows.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Pages 303 - 304


I did not think that Dietrich would be starved out. He was holding Torcadino with only some five thousand men, and that many, I thought, might subsist on produce grown within the city, in yards, in torn-up streets, in roof gardens, and such. The civilian population, helpfully, had been for the most part expelled from the city shortly after its capture. An exception had been made, of course, for enslaved women of interest. One of the duties of these women, many of high caste, now enslaved, would doubtless be the tending of the soldiers' gardens.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 389


This sort of thing is a sport common at peasant festivals, incidentally, though there, of course, usually far from a city, within the circle of the palisade, the competition is free, the skin and wine being donated by one fellow or another, usually as his gift to the festival to which all in one way or another contribute, for example, by the donation of produce, meat or firewood.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 36


Indeed, most deliveries, as of produce from the country, not borne on the backs of animals of peasants, are made at night or in the early morning.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 102


This was only to be expected as many of the vendors in the market were peasants, come in with produce from outside the walls.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 245


In the areas of the market, stretching almost from the north to the south side of the street, the street is shaded by a large number of vine-covered trellises, creating bowers, which provide protection for the produce and, later in the day, shade for pedestrians.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 387


There were, of course, the pans, pots, utensils, lamps, pails, and such, which, on shelves and dangling from poles, she supposed might have suggested the name of the market, but there were also stalls, as well, specializing in many other forms of goods, for example, stalls of fruits and vegetables, and produce of various sorts,
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 230


In the festival camp there were many forms of merchandise, other than the flesh loot, such as she, of Cosian conquests, merchandise such as produce, meat, leather and metal work, cloth, cabinetry, artifacts, tools, weapons, remedies, wagons, carts, precious stones, and such.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 399


The coffle was stopped, twice, before discharging one or more of its occupants, once when, apparently, a line of wagons was passing near us. They were probably produce wagons.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 102


We reached the shop of Epicrates well before the bar signifying the end of curfew. In another Ahn or so, some of the smaller gates would open, and many Peasants, with their baskets and sacks of fresh produce, would begin to make their way to the various markets in the city.
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 295


These villages pay the rice tax, supplied primarily in produce, rice itself, to the daimyo and the shogun receives his tax, usually in kind, as well, from the daimyos.
. . .
Similarly various forms of produce other than rice may be taxed, exchanged by bartering, and so on.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 181


The markets commonly keep similar hours, produce brought in early from the fields.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 372


We had left Ar well before dawn, by the Viktel Gate. As we were departing, produce wagons, in their lines, were entering the city. This is to bring fresh produce to the morning markets.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 599


The Cove of Harpalos was not heavily trafficked, but it was, in effect, the port by means of which several inland villages, bartering the produce of their gardens and orchards, could reach the sea.
Avengers of Gor     Book 36     Page 58


I descended from the parapet and made my way to the town gate, which had now been opened, to allow the ingress of carts, filled with produce.
Avengers of Gor     Book 36     Page 299





 


Pumpkins
To The Top


"Many of the tribes permit small agricultural communities to exist within their domains," she said. "The individuals in these communities are bound to the son and owned collectively by the tribes within whose lands they are permitted to live. They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 233 - 234





 


Radishes
To The Top


"Who is the new Tatrix?" I asked.

"Dorna the Proud," said the slave, who tumbled onions, turnips, radishes, potatoes and bread into the feed trough.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 155


Ottar dug for the Forkbeard and myself two radishes and we, wiping the dirt from them, ate them.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 102


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded. At the oasis, because of the warm climate, the farmers can grow two or more crops a year.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37





 


Squash
To The Top


"Many of the tribes permit small agricultural communities to exist within their domains," she said. "The individuals in these communities are bound to the son and owned collectively by the tribes within whose lands they are permitted to live. They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 233 - 234





 


Suls
To The Top


We permitted Cara to run free. Tina, on the other hand, had been kept in the slave strap and bracelets, except when she was working in the kitchen area, cooking, and peeling suls and such.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 66


there were even the small bowls of coins, brought as offerings by the poor, to solicit the favor of initiates that they might intercede with Priest-Kings on their behalf, that the food roots would not fail, the suls not rot, the fish come to the plankton, the verr yield her kid with health to both, the vulos lay many eggs.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 35


"You," he said, "gather verr dung in your kirtle and carry it to the sul patch!"
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 101


On the way back to the hall, cutting through the tospit trees, we had passed by the sul patch. In it, his back to us, hoeing, was the young broad-shouldered thrall, in his white tunic, with cropped hair. He did not see us. Approaching him, her kirtle held high in two hands, it filled with verr dung, was blond, collared Thyri.

"She has good legs," said Ottar.

We were quite close to them; neither of them saw us. Thyri, in the afternoon, had made many trips to the sul patch.
. . .
She, holding her kirtle with her left hand, angrily scattered the dung about the sul plants. It would be left to a thrall to hoe it in about the plants.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Pages 103 - 104


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded. At the oasis, because of the warm climate, the farmers can grow two or more crops a year.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


Gorean men, unlike the men of Earth, do not bother much with girls that are not pleasing to them. Yet even such may find their utility, and indirectly serve masters, perhaps sweating in the public kitchens of the high cylinders, or laboring, neck-locked, at the looms in the cloth mills, or digging, chained with others, in the sul fields. It is a rare girl who, having tasted the mills or sul fields, does not beg her proprietor to be sold again on the open market, that she may attempt anew, and perhaps more successfully this time, to be pleasing to a man.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 132


Sul paga is, when distilled, though the Sul itself is yellow, as clear as water. The Sul is a tuberous root of the Sul plant; it is a Gorean staple.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 134


I cut at the soil with the hoe, chopping and loosening the dirt about the roots of the sul plant.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 190


I cut again at the soil with the hoe, chopping down, loosening the dirt about the roots of the sul plants.
. . .

I cut again at the soil with the hoe, chopping down, loosening the dirt about the roots of the sul plants.
. . .

I wanted to throw myself down and weep, but the suls must be hoed.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 194


I chopped at the dry earth about the sul plant.

I had been twenty days slave at Tabuk's Ford.

The peasant hoe has a staff some six feet in length. Its head is iron, and heavy, some six inches at the cutting edge, tapering to four inches where it joins the staff. It is fastened to the staff by the staff's fitting through a hollow, ringlike socket at its termination. A wedge is driven into the head of the staff to expand and tighten the wood in the socket.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 201


"Put on your tunic," said Melina to me. "Get a hoe. Go to the sul fields. Hoe suls. Bran Loort will fetch you and bring you back when it is time. Speak to no one."
. . .

I chopped at the dry earth about the sul plant.
. . .

I cut down at the suls. I was to say nothing.

I was alone in the fields.

I lifted the heavy hoe, with the stout staff and great metal blade, again and again. It was terribly hot work, and hard. My back hurt. My hands hurt. My muscles ached. I worked hard, very hard, for I was a peasant's girl. Such girls are not treated gently if they do not do full work. I did nor with to be whipped.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Pages 218 - 219


"Suls, Turpah, Vangis!" I heard a woman call, sitting amidst baskets, hawking her produce.
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 314


"Here," she said, embarrassed. She drew some roots, and two suls, from her robe. They had been freshly dug. Dirt still clung to them. She put them down on the stones, between us.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 22


"We need no more of you refugees here," snapped a woman, a seller of suls at the Teiban Market.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 260


He then went about his business. The woman near us, sitting on a blanket on the stones, her basket of suls before her, looked up. "Do you want suls?" she asked.

"No," I said.

"Be gone, then," she said.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 268


I watched a free woman hobble by, carrying a sack of suls on her back.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 442


I heard another woman's voice, this one hawking fish, and then the voice of another woman, that one hawking suls. The sul is a large, thick-skinned, starchy, yellow-fleshed root vegetable. It is very common on this world. There are a thousand ways in which it is prepared. It is fed even to slaves. I had had some at the house, narrow, cooked slices smeared with butter, sprinkled with salt, fed to me by hand. We had loved them, simple as they were. I, on my knees, my hands manacled behind me, had begged prettily for them. Sometimes they were simply thrown to us, on the floor, and we squirmed for them on our bellies, competing with one another for them. Then the insistent cries of these two women, proclaiming the excellence of their respective offerings, were left behind.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 80


An organization of great farms, acting in concert, of course, could reduce competition, and eventually regulate prices rather as they pleased, particularly with regard to staples such as Sa-Tarna and Suls.
Dancer of Gor     Book 22     Page 304


She was, after all, a relatively new slave, and had been a house slave, apparently primarily consigned to domestic duties, serving table and such, and was now a field slave, whose primary services would presumably lie in such labors as the carrying of water and the hoeing of suls.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 314


Kika and Tira were washing suls. These would be later baked, and used in the evening feeding.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 637


As slaves they were poor stuff. I doubted that, stripped and exhibited, they would bring much off the block. To be sure, some men might like them. Perhaps some Peasants might buy them, to hoe suls, to pick beans, to swill tarsks, to draw the plow, to warm their feet in the winter.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 376


So I followed her through the market, my head down, until we reached a stall, where the Lady Bina I standing beside her, bargained for a stone of suls. It was late in the day, and the prices tend to be lower at such a time.
"I will need you," she said, "to carry the suls."
Conspirators of Gor     Book 31     Page 215


Then I found a Sul plant the golden Sul, and dug out the tuber, washed it clean in the water, and consumed it, I fear voraciously.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 267


I now had no fear, at least at present, at least until winter, of starving in the forest. Other than Tur-Pah, I could recognize the leafage which betokened Suls, usually found in the open, in drier, sandier soils,
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 441 - 442





 


Sul - Brown
To The Top


About the beasts' necks, and behind the saddles, hung panniers of grain and sacks of woven netting containing dried larmas and brown suls.
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 36





 


Sul - Golden
To The Top


The principal ingredients of Sullage are the golden Sul, the starchy, golden-brown vine-borne fruit of the golden-leaved Sul plant;
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 44


The Tarn Keeper, who was called by those in the tavern Mip, bought the food, bosk steak and yellow bread, peas and Torian olives, and two golden-brown, starchy Suls, broken open and filled with melted bosk cheese.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 168


I saw too, fields, fenced with rocks, in the sloping area. In them were growing, small at this season, shafts of Sa-Tarna; too, there would be peas, and beans, cabbages and onions, and patches of the golden sul, capable of surviving at this latitude.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81


"See him, the peasant, there, he, the fourth in the line, those men carrying suls!"

Ellen did indeed see the figure referred to by her companion, but noted little of interest, or little out of the ordinary. To be sure, the man who was fourth in the line, a line of some ten or eleven men, was a very large man, an unusually large man, but many of those of the Peasants are well built, even massive. His hair was long and unkempt, his tunic ragged. He was bearded. He was partly bent over, as were the others, carrying, tied on a frame, in a large, open, netlike sack, large and bulging, a considerable quantity of suls, these golden-skinned, suls, a common, tuberous Gorean vegetable. They were doubtless on their way, coming from one of the nearby villages, to one of the wholesale sul markets in the city.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 322


"There are golden suls," said Lord Yamada "with butter and cream, from our own dairy."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 206





 


Sul - Reddish
To The Top


Four docksmen passed, each bearing on his shoulder a bulging, porous, loosely woven sack of reddish suls.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 81





 


Sul - Tiny
To The Top


I heard a snuffling, and grunting, to one side, and stopped. There were three small tarsks there, rooting, only a few paces away. Some tarsks are extremely large, so large that they are sometimes hunted in the open plains with lances, from tarnback, but these were no larger than verr. The boar can be dangerous, with its short temper and curved, slashing tusks, but I saw no boar here, and, in any event, they are most dangerous in the spring, when marking out territory. They were rooting, of course, and this meant food. I waited for a time, and then, when they had drifted on, rooting elsewhere, investigated their rooting place, with its turned, gouged ground. I found some small, tuberous roots which had been missed, or rejected. I did not know what they were, but from the texture of the root and its starchiness, I would have supposed some tiny variety of wild Sul.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 244 - 245





 


Sul - Wild
To The Top


One, too, dug him tubers, wild suls,
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 183


I knew enough of the forest within the wands to recognize many things outside them which might be eaten; leafy Tur-Pah, parasitic on Tur trees, of course, but, too, certain plants whose roots were edible, as the wild Sul; and there were flat ground pods in tangles which I could tear open, iron fruit whose shells might be broken between rocks, and autumn gim berries, purple and juicy, perhaps named for the bird, whose cast fruit lies under the snow, the seeds surviving until spring, when one in a thousand might germinate.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 243


I heard a snuffling, and grunting, to one side, and stopped. There were three small tarsks there, rooting, only a few paces away. Some tarsks are extremely large, so large that they are sometimes hunted in the open plains with lances, from tarnback, but these were no larger than verr. The boar can be dangerous, with its short temper and curved, slashing tusks, but I saw no boar here, and, in any event, they are most dangerous in the spring, when marking out territory. They were rooting, of course, and this meant food. I waited for a time, and then, when they had drifted on, rooting elsewhere, investigated their rooting place, with its turned, gouged ground. I found some small, tuberous roots which had been missed, or rejected. I did not know what they were, but from the texture of the root and its starchiness, I would have supposed some tiny variety of wild Sul.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 244 - 245





 


Turnips
To The Top


"I have peas and turnips, garlic and onions in my hut," said the man, his bundle like a giant's hump on his back.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 29


"Who is the new Tatrix?" I asked.

"Dorna the Proud," said the slave, who tumbled onions, turnips, radishes, potatoes and bread into the feed trough.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 155


At the oasis will be grown a hybrid, brownish Sa-Tarna, adapted to the heat of the desert; most Sa-Tarna is yellow; and beans, berries, onions tuber suls, various sorts of melons, a foliated leaf vegetable, called Katch, and various root vegetables, such as turnips, carrots, radishes, of the sphere and cylinder varieties, and korts, a large, brownish-skinned, thick-skinned, sphere-shaped vegetable, usually some six inches in width, the interior of which is yellowish, fibrous and heavily seeded. At the oasis, because of the warm climate, the farmers can grow two or more crops a year.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


"They supplement their diets by picking berries and digging wild turnips," said the first lad.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 124


There is no simple translation for 'Owopte' but, literally, it means the place from which a turnip is dug. He had used to go out with his mother to dig turnips when he had been a little boy. That was a pet name which she had given him. He had been fond of the vegetable. He had not lived long enough to choose a suitable adult name for himself.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 220


Lady Yanina, kneeling before a pan of water, under the supervision of Rowena, who was tending the fire, was washing and scraping garden vegetables, mostly onions, turnips and suls. These would later be used in a stew.
Players of Gor     Book 20     Page 248





 


Tur-Pah
To The Top


The principal ingredients of Sullage are the golden Sul, the starchy, golden-brown vine-borne fruit of the golden-leaved Sul plant; the curled, red, ovate leaves of the Tur-Pah, a tree parasite, cultivated in host orchards of Tur trees,
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Pages 44 - 45


Besides several of the flower trees there were also some Ka-la-na trees, or the yellow wine trees of Gor; there was one large-trunked, reddish Tur tree, about which curled its assemblage of Tur-Pah, a vinelike tree parasite with curled, scarlet, ovate leaves, rather lovely to look upon; the leaves of the Tur-Pah incidentally are edible and figure in certain Gorean dishes, such as sullage, a kind of soup;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 217


"Release him!" cried a vendor of Tur-Pah, pushing through baskets of the vinelike vegetable.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 244


"There is a large stand of Tur trees, west of the dock, near the wands, well twined with Tur-Pah," said Relia. "Men with climbing tools have freed much of it. It has been drying on racks since yesterday.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 230


On the other hand, I had no fear of starvation, at least for many days, until the onset of winter. I knew enough of the forest within the wands to recognize many things outside them which might be eaten; leafy Tur-Pah, parasitic on Tur trees, of course,
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 243


If necessary, I might cling to a log and float with the current or construct a small raft of branches, bound together with wild Tur-Pah vines.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 244


I noted Tur-Pah clinging about nearby Tur trees. The Tur tree is tall and hardy, and the common host to Tur-Pah but Tur-Pah interestingly, does not thrive on all Tur trees. The difference apparently has to do with the grades and natures of the soil in which the tree is rooted.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 267


Soon, about the trunk of a tree, one of two so adorned, or afflicted, I saw, at a height I could reach, thick and coiling, a nest of Tur-Pah. I tore a length of it from the trunk about which it clung, its tiny, sharp roots anchored in the bark, and pulled away several of the heavy fleshy leaves. One would prefer Tur-Pah, certainly on a cool night, boiled in Sullage, or in some stew or even fried, salted, and honeyed, but, too, it is often, perhaps most often, eaten raw. It is the basic ingredient in most Gorean salads.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 441


I ladled the grain and vulo soup, seasoned with brown, ground tur-pah, carefully into the bowl.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 157


"Tur-pah, tur-pah," called a hawker, moving amongst the wagons.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 614





 


Wagmeza
To The Top


"Many of the tribes permit small agricultural communities to exist within their domains," she said. "The individuals in these communities are bound to the son and owned collectively by the tribes within whose lands they are permitted to live. They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
. . .

"For the day of breeding the men, hooded and in coffle, are marched between the small communities. On the day of breeding they are led to the selected women, already hooded, tied and awaiting them. The breeding takes place in the wagmeza fields, under the eyes of the masters."
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 233 - 234





 


Wagmu
To The Top


"Many of the tribes permit small agricultural communities to exist within their domains," she said. "The individuals in these communities are bound to the son and owned collectively by the tribes within whose lands they are permitted to live. They grow produce for their masters, such as wagmeza and wagmu, maize, or corn, and such things as pumpkins and squash.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Pages 233 - 234















 



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