Se'Kara
The Second Turning
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Passage Hand
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Year 10,172 Contasta Ar


Trees



Here are relevant references from the Books where trees are mentioned.
I make no pronouncements on these matters, but report them as I find them.
Arrive at your own conclusions.

I wish you well,
Fogaban



     Swamp Forest
     Tree
          Bar
          Cacao
          Deciduous
          Evergreen
          Exotic
          Flahdah
          Flower
          Fruit
           Fruit-Bearing
          Hogarthe
          Jungle
          Ka-la-na
          Needle
          Olive
          Palm
               Date
               Fan
               Oil
               Palm
               Wine
          Pod
          Scent
          Shore
          Stunted
          Swamp Forest
          Tem-Wood
               Yellow
          Thentis Needle
          Tiny
          Tospit
          Tur
          Tur-Pah
 


Swamp Forest
To The Top


The third day's camp was made in the swamp forest, that borders the city of Ar on the north. I had chosen this area because it is the most uninhabitable area within tarn strike of Ar.
. . .

But an hour before midnight, on the day I knew was the Planting Feast of Sa-Tarna, I climbed again to the saddle of my tarn, drew back on the one-strap, and rose above the lush trees of the swamp forest.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 74


I crossed swords with the nearer of the two warriors in a brief passage that could have lasted only an instant. I was suddenly aware, dizzily conscious, that one of the enemy tarns was sinking downward, flopping wildly, falling into the recesses of the swamp forest below.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 75


When I opened my eyes, I found myself partially adhering to a vast network of broad, elastic strands that formed a structure, perhaps a pasang in width, and through which at numerous points projected the monstrous trees of the swamp forest.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 81


"I will take you to the edge of the swamp if you like," said the insect. I assented, thanking him, this rational creature who lifted me gently to his back and moved with such dainty rapidity, picking his way exquisitely through the swamp forest.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 84


A shattering squeal of pain rent the heavy air of the swamp forest,
. . .
About its flanks, as it settled into the mud, there was a stirring in the water, and I realized the small water lizards of the swamp forest were engaged in their grisly work. I bent down and washed the blade of my sword as well as I could in the green water, but my tunic was so splattered and soaked that I had no way to dry the blade. Accordingly, carrying the sword in my hand, I waded back to the foot of the swamp tree and climbed the small, dry knoll at its base.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Pages 85 - 86


"We were somewhere over the swamp forest," said the girl, "when we flew into a flock of wild tarns. My tarn attacked the leader of the flock."

She shuddered at the memory, and I pitied her for what must have been a horrifying experience, lashed helpless to the saddle of a giant tarn reeling in a death struggle for the mastery of a flock, high over the trees of the swamp forest.
. . .

So now the tarn was gone, returned to his natural wild state, the Home Stone was in the saddle pack, and I had failed, and the daughter of the Ubar had failed, and we stood facing one another on a green knoll in the swamp forest of Ar.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 89


"Wait!" cried the daughter of the Ubar. "You can't leave me here!" She stumbled a bit from the knoll, tripped and fell in the water. She knelt in the green stagnant water, her hands held out to me, pleading, as if she suddenly realized the full horror of her plight, what it would mean to be abandoned in the swamp forest. "Take me with you," she begged.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 91


Her skin was radiant, the dried mire of the swamp forest at last washed away.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 112


"Great Mintar," I spoke up, "forgive this she-tharlarion. Her father was a goat keeper by the swamp forests of Ar, and I did steal her, but she begged me to take her from the village.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 122


In the glade by the swamp forests, in the grain fields of the empire, on the great highway of Ar, in the regal, exotic caravan of Mintar, I had found the woman I loved, a scion of a barbaric race on a remote and unknown world.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 139


I cursed because I had lost the tarn-goad in the quicksands of Ar's swamp forest.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 143


I looked toward the northern forests. It had been so many years. I recalled her, Talena. She had been a dream in my heart, a memory, an ideal of a youthful love, never forgotten, glowing still, always remembered. I remembered her as I had seen her, in the swamp forest, south of Ar,
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Pages 367 - 368


For years Talena, the magnificent Talena, had been in my heart's deepest dreams, my first love, my never forgotten love. She had burned in my memory, unforgettably. I recalled her from the fields near the Swamp Forest south of Ar,
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 10


Tiny tharlarion, similar to those in the swamp forest south of Ar, dropped, snapping, from the bared hook.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 22





 


Tree
To The Top


During the first day, sheltered in the occasional knots of trees that dot the border plains of Ar, I slept, fed on my rations, and practiced with my weapons, trying to keep my muscles vital in spite of the stiffness that attends prolonged periods on tarnback.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 73


Gor, sparsely inhabited by human beings, teems with animal life, and in the next weeks I had no difficulty in living by hunting. I supplemented my diet with fresh fruit picked from bushes and trees, and fish speared in Gor's cold, swift-flowing streams.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 48


She knelt, her back against a slender, white birchlike tree to which she was chained naked.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 186


The girl shrank against the tree, her back against its white, rough bark.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 190


My right ankle, by a short length of black leather, was tied to a small, white-barked tree.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 33


There was a white-barked, fallen tree close at hand, within the camp enclosure. It was broken off some four feet from the ground, and the fallen trunk, from that height, inclined downward.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 53


I felt the smooth, brittle bark of the white-barked tree beneath my back,
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 60


The girl pressed her cheek against the rough bark of the tree and moaned, and wept, staining the bark with her tears.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 150


"Go sit by the slave post," I said to her, referring to that slim tree to which the other girls were secured, which served us as slave post, "and cross your wrists behind you."
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 297


Tende and Alice were already, hands tied behind them, wrist-tethered to the small tree which served us as slave post.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 309


In the rain forest we may distinguish three separate ecological zones, or tiers or levels. Each of these tiers, or levels or layers, is characterized by its own special forms of plant and animal life. These layers are marked off by divergent tree heights. The highest level or zone is that of the "emergents," that of those trees which have thrust themselves up above the dense canopies below them. This level is roughly from a hundred and twenty-five feet Gorean to two hundred feet Gorean. The second level is often spoken of as the canopy, or as that of the canopies. This is the fantastic green cover which constitutes the main ceiling of the jungle. It is what would dominate one's vision if one were passing over the jungle in tarn flight or viewing it from the height of a tall mountain. The canopy, or zone of the canopies, ranges from about sixty to one hundred and twenty-five feet high, Gorean measure. The first zone extends from the ground to the beginning of the canopies above, some sixty feet in height, Gorean measure.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 311


"It is the tree!" suddenly cried Cancega, rushing to the tree and striking it with the medicine wand.

"It is tall and straight!" shouted the two seconds, in the dance, and most of the others, as well, including my friend, Cuwignaka.

Two men rushed to Winyela and untied her hands. She was pushed forward, the tethers still on her neck, but now rather behind her.

A long-handled, single-bladed ax was pressed into her hands. It was a trade ax. Its back was blunted, for the driving of pegs, stakes and wedges. It was heavy for her.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 35
. . .

I looked about. To be sure, there were no women present, with the exception of the lovely Winyela.

She began, under the direction of Cancega, and others, to strike at the lower portions of the tree.

I wondered why there were no free women present. Could it be that something was to occur which was regarded as not being suitable, perhaps, for the sensibilities of free women?

Winyela continued to chop at the tree.
It was some twenty-five to thirty feet in height, but it was not, really, a large tree. Its trunk was slim and polelike, and surely only some eight to ten inches in width. A man, working with such a tool, would have felled it in a matter of moments. Winyela, of course, was neither a man nor a woodsman. She was only a lovely slave. Her hands were widely spaced on the ax handle, and her blows were short. Cancega and the others, interestingly, in spite of the fact that she was a slave, were patient with her. To be sure, she had enough sense not to beg to rest.
. . .

In a moment there was a cracking noise, and then, after a few more blows, a splintering, rending sound as the tree tipped, and then, its branches striking the earth, fell. Five last blows were struck, cutting the last fibers and wood, and the trunk, freed, laid level, a yard above the ground, held in place by branches and foliage.

The men grunted with approval. The ax was removed from Winyela's hands and she was dragged back and knelt, her knees closely together, on the ground. The two men who held her tethers now stood beside her, the slack in the tethers, looped, now taken up, the rawhide loops in their fists.
. . .

Several of the men, now, under the direction of Cancega, began to remove the branches and bark from the felled tree. Two forks were left, one about eighteen feet high and the other about twenty-three feet high. This was to allow for the pole later being set in the earth, within the enclosure of the dance, set among its supporting stakes, to a depth of some seven or eight feet. These forks would then be, respectively, about ten and fifteen feet high.

The slim trunk of the tree, with its forks, stripped of its bark, was now long, smooth and white.

It was set in two stout tripods of branches, about a yard above the ground.

Paint was brought forth, in a small clay vessel. The girl, too, was again brought forward.
It was she, herself, with the paint, the slave, who must proclaim that the pole was Kaiila.
. . .

The three bands, each about four or five inches in width, and separated also by such distances, were painted in such a way that the bottom ring, or band, was about seven and a half to eight and a half feet from the base of the pole. Thus, when the pole was set in the ground, amidst its supporting stakes, these circles would be at the visible base, or root, of the pole. Too, they would be beneath the belt of an encircling dancer.

"It is Kaiila!" shouted the men.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Pages 36 - 38


A motion was on the floor that a new preserve in the northern forests be obtained, that more timber for the arsenal be available. In the northern forests Port Kar already had several such preserves. There is a ceremony in the establishment of such a preserve, involving proclamations and the soundings of trumpets. Such preserves are posted, and surrounded by ditches to keep out cattle and unlicensed wagoners. There are wardens who watch the trees, guarding against illegal cutting and pasturage, and inspectors who, each year, tally and examine them. The wardens are also responsible, incidentally, for managing and improving the woods. They do such work as thinning and planting, and trimming, and keeping the protective ditch in repair. They are also responsible for bending and fastening certain numbers of young trees so that they will grow into desired shapes, usually to be used for frames, and stem and sternposts. Individual trees, not in the preserves, which are claimed by Port Kar, are marked with the seal of the arsenal. The location of all such trees is kept in a book available to the Council of Captains. These preserves are usually located near rivers, in order to facilitate bringing cut trees to the sea. Trees may also be purchased from the Forest People, who will cut them in the winter, when they can be dragged on sleds to the sea. If there is a light snowfall in a given year, the price of timber is often higher. Port Kar is, incidentally, completely dependent on the northern timber. Tur wood is used for galley frames, and beams and clamps and posts, and for hull planking; Ka-la-na serves for capstans and mastheads; Tem-wood for rudders and oars; and the needle trees, the evergreens, for masts and spars, and cabin and deck planking.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 141


It had been difficult making our way through the brush and thickset trees. To reach the high trees of the forest, the great Tur trees, would be perhaps better than another hour's trek.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 122


In Torvaldsland, fine timber is at a premium. Too, what fine lumber there is, is often marked and hoarded for the use of shipwrights If a man of Torvaldsland must choose between his hall and his ship, it is the ship which, invariably, wins his choice.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 90


The fields were broken now, with occasional trees, many of them flat-topped.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 32


My mind raced rapidly. Contrary to yesterday, he had not this day traveled in the light, but had spent the day in this tiny glade, only a few feet wide, concealed by trees about, and, overhead, by their interlacing branches.
Slave Girl of Gor     Book 11     Page 38


Trees do not flourish in the land of Imnak and their needs for wood must largely be satisfied by occasional finds at the shore, driftwood, from hundreds of pasangs south, dragged from the chilled water.
Beasts of Gor     Book 12     Page 176


One does not make one's camp in the jungle near tall trees. Because of the abundant amount of moisture the trees do not send down deep tap roots, but their root systems spread more horizontally. In the fierce winds which often lash the jungle it is not unusual for these shallowly rooted trees, uprooted and overturned, to come crashing down.
. . .
In the rain forest some trees grow and lose leaves all year long, remaining always in foliage. Others, though not at the same time, even in the same species, will lose their foliage for a few weeks and then again produce buds and a new set of leaves. They have maintained their cycles of regeneration but these cycles, interestingly, are often no longer synchronized with either the northern or southern winters and springs.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 310


In the rain forest we may distinguish three separate ecological zones, or tiers or levels. Each of these tiers, or levels or layers, is characterized by its own special forms of plant and animal life. These layers are marked off by divergent tree heights. The highest level or zone is that of the "emergents," that of those trees which have thrust themselves up above the dense canopies below them. This level is roughly from a hundred and twenty-five feet Gorean to two hundred feet Gorean. The second level is often spoken of as the canopy, or as that of the canopies. This is the fantastic green cover which constitutes the main ceiling of the jungle. It is what would dominate one's vision if one were passing over the jungle in tarn flight or viewing it from the height of a tall mountain. The canopy, or zone of the canopies, ranges from about sixty to one hundred and twenty-five feet high, Gorean measure. The first zone extends from the ground to the beginning of the canopies above, some sixty feet in height, Gorean measure.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 311


Contrary to popular belief the floor of the jungle is not a maze of impenetrable growth, which must be hacked through with machete or panga. Quite the contrary, it is usually rather open. This is the result of the denseness of the overhead canopies, because of which the ground is much shaded, the factor which tends to inhibit and limit ground growth. Looking about among the slender, scattered colonnades of trees, exploding far overhead in the lush capitals of the green canopy, one is often exposed to vistas of one to two hundred feet, or more. It is hard not to be reminded of the columns in one of the great, shaded temples of Initiates, as in Turia or Ar. And yet here, in the rain forest, the natural architecture of sun, and shade, and growth, seems a vital celebration of life and its glory, not a consequence of aberrations and the madness of abnegations, not an invention of dismal men who have foresworn women, even slaves, and certain vegetables, and live by parasitically feeding and exploiting the superstitions of the lower castes. There are, of course, impenetrable, or almost impenetrable, areas in the jungle. These are generally "second-growth" patches. Through them one can make one's way only tortuously, cutting with the machete or panga, stroke by stroke. They normally occur only where men have cleared land, and then, later, abandoned it. That is why they are called "second-growth" patches; they normally occur along rivers and are not characteristic of the botanical structure of the virgin rain forest itself.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 313


I considered the forest behind her. The trees were thick, the brush, near the river, heavy.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 385


"They will be like the leaves on the trees, like the bits of sand at the shore," he said.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 399


This shop is located on the great avenue of the Central Cylinder, which is more than four hundred feet wide, an avenue used in triumphs, dominated by the Central Cylinder of Ar itself, which stood at one end of it. There are many trees planted at the sides of this avenue, and there are frequent fountains.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 175


A man was now riding slowly forward, alone, toward some trees a few hundred yards away. Lines of such trees, in the Barrens, and low, sloping geodesics, watersheds, tend to mark, often, the location of the tiny streams which occur in the country.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 33


Trees, generally not common in the marshy delta, were more common now, as we were approaching its southern edge.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 338


"We are not in the reserves of Port Kar," I said to Pertinax. This was obvious, for the reserves are gardened, or nearly so, shrubbery cleared, trees spaced, and such, that they may grow exuberantly upward, muchly straight, and tall. One nurses, so to speak, the loftiest and best wood, before its harvesting. Too, we had crossed none of the ditches that act as boundaries to a reserve, whether one of Port Kar or of another polity. Here, in this part of the forest, there was a great deal of shrubbery, brush, broken branches, fallen timber, debris of various sorts. Occasionally one waded through leaves, as through thigh-high surf. Here the trees were muchly together, each challenged by the others, leaves competing for sunlight, roots engaged in their subterranean contests to absorb water and minerals.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 141 - 142


The camp seemed to be, more than anything, a lumber camp, for logging was in process in the vicinity, and one, not unoften, heard the striking of axes, the crash of falling trees. These logs were trimmed, sawn, harnessed, and dragged by grunting, hissing draft tharlarion to staging areas where, skinned of bark, and piled, they awaited hoisting by weights and pulleys onto wagons, which were then drawn by tharlarion down a narrow, muddy road, soon disappearing amongst the trees.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Pages 179 - 180


Here there were unusual stones, brought in from the coast, shaped by centuries of tides; and all about were varieties of trees, large and small, some fruit-bearing, some ablaze with blossoms. From the limbs of some of these trees hung lanterns, now unlit, but swaying in the breeze. From the limbs of others hung slender tubes of wood on strings, which tubes, when rustled by the wind, would strike one another, emitting charming notes.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 159





 


Tree - Bar
To The Top


One, too, dug him tubers, wild suls, and the other brought him tree fruit, kernelled pods which dangle from the Bar tree, native, as we understand it, neither to Earth or Gor.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 183





 


Tree - Cacao
To The Top


"This is warmed chocolate," I said, pleased. It was very rich and creamy.

"Yes, Mistress," said the girl.

"It is very good," I said.

"Thank you, Mistress," she said.

"Is it from Earth?" I asked.

"Not directly," she said. "Many things here, of course, ultimately have an Earth origin. It is not improbable that the beans from which the first cacao trees on this world were grown were brought from Earth."

"Do the trees grow near here?" I asked.

"No, Mistress," she said. "We obtain the beans, from which the chocolate is made, from Cosian merchants, who, in turn, obtain them in the tropics."
Kajira of Gor     Book 19     Page 61





 


Tree - Deciduous
To The Top


The group was directed toward a narrow trail, one winding its way gently downward among deciduous trees.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Pages 381 - 382





 


Tree - Evergreen
To The Top


Before dawn the tarn train once more landed, this time amongst a cluster of small hills, covered with needle trees, evergreen trees, and took its shelter in a narrow ravine.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 353





 


Tree - Exotic
To The Top


It is a common dream of public slaves, tavern slaves, brothel slaves, the girls of the laundries, the public kitchens, the mills, and such, that they should have a private master. And, of course, the dream goes far beyond this, for usually the dream is to be the single slave of a private master, to be the only slave in her master's household. For example, there is often much misery, much grief, even lamentation, in the pleasure garden of a rich man, who is assuredly a private master, where slaves may often constitute little more than another adornment, much as the colored grasses, the trimmed shrubberies, the beds of flowers, the exotic trees, the unusual fruits, to enhance the beauty of the garden.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 469





 


Tree - Flahdah
To The Top


Occasionally we passed a water hole, and the tents of nomads. About some of these water holes there were a dozen or so small trees, flahdah trees, like flat-topped umbrellas on crooked sticks, not more than twenty feet high; they are narrow branched, with lanceolate leaves. About the water, little more than muddy, shallow ponds, save for the flahdahs, nothing grew; only dried, cracked earth, whitish and buckled, for a radius of more than a quarter of a pasang, could be found; what vegetation there might have been had been grazed off, even to the roots; one could place one's hand in the cracks in the earth; each crack adjoins others to constitute an extensive reticulated pattern; each square in this pattern is shallowly concave. The nomads, when camping at a watering place, commonly pitch their tent near a tree; this affords them shade; also they place and hang goods in the branches of the tree, using it for storage.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 72


Once she stole a date. I did not whip her. I chained her, arms over her head, back against the trunk, to a flahdah tree. I permitted nomad children to discomfit her. They are fiendish little beggars. They tickled her with the lanceolate leaves of the tree.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 81


She staggered backward, frightened, stumbling, until she was backed against the backward-leaning trunk of a flahdah tree. She looked up at him. "You're a pretty little slave girl," he said. "I would not mind owning you." She turned her head away. "Oh!" she cried. His hand was on her body, and she, writhing, weeping, with her heels, pushing herself, back scraping on the bark, climbed almost a foot up the slanting trunk, before he, through her veil, kissed her, leaving a stain of blood on the silk, and, with his hands, knotted her hair about the trunk of the tree, then leaving her. She was, weeping, on her knees at the tree, trying to undo the knots in her hair which bound her to it, which knots, being on the other side of the trunk, she could not see.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 89 - 90


"The right ear," said the next man, grasping the long, slim lance, eight feet Gorean in length, marked with red and yellow swirling stripes, terminating in an extremely narrow point, razored, steel, some eleven inches in length, and lanceolate, as the leaf of the flahdah tree.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 234


He was right-handed. He would pass on my right. I noted the lance. It was long, slim, some eight foot Gorean in length; it was marked with red and yellow swirling stripes; it terminated in an extremely narrow point, razored, steel, some eleven inches in length, lanceolate, as the leaf of the flahdah tree.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 297





 


Tree - Flower
To The Top


I saw the high walls of what was undoubtedly a Pleasure Garden. I could see, here and there, on the inside, the tops of graceful flower trees.
. . .

I now saw him leap to the wall and, scarcely looking about, run along and then leap to the swaying trunk of one of the flower trees and descend swiftly to the darkness of the gardens.
. . .

I had no difficulty finding Harold. Indeed, coming down the segmented trunk of the flower tree, I almost landed on top of him.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 215 - 216


And so we sat with our backs against the flower tree in the House of Saphrar, merchant of Turia. I looked at the lovely, dangling loops of interwoven blossoms which hung from the curved branches of the tree. I knew that the clusters of flowers which, cluster upon cluster, graced those linear, hanging stems, would each be a bouquet in itself, for the trees are so bred that the clustered flowers emerge in subtle, delicate patterns of shades and hues.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 217


In a short while Harold, carrying the struggling Hereena, retraced our steps to the central hall and descended the steps of the porch and returned by means of the curving walks between the shrubs and pools to the flower tree by means of which we had originally entered the Pleasure Gardens of Saphrar of Turia.
. . .

Making our way up the flower tree with Hereena, who fought like a young she-larl, was not easy. I went part way up the tree and was handed the girl, and then Harold would go up above me and I would hoist her up a way to him, and then I would pass him, and so on. Occasionally, to my irritation, we became entangled in the trailing, looped stems of the tree, each with its richness of clustered flowers, whose beauty I was no longer in a mood to appreciate. At last we got Hereena to the top of tree.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 223 - 224


Although the wall was several feet from the top of the tree I managed, by springing on one of the curved branches, to build up enough spring pressure to leap to where I could get my fingers over the edge of the wall.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 225


"That is a forest bird," said Kisu.

The mindar is adapted for short, rapid flights, almost spurts, its wings beating in sudden flurries, hurrying it from branch to branch, for camouflage in flower trees, and for drilling the bark of such trees for larvae and grubs.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 282


Strangers will reprimand us, and even strike us, if we do not hold ourselves well. In a sense, I suppose, we are part of the beauties of the city, an aspect of its scenic delights, part of the attractions of the area, as might be her flower trees and brightly plumaged birds.
. . .

And suppose that we were not that rare. Think of the flower trees, the brightly plumaged birds!
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 403





 


Tree - Fruit
To The Top


I saw small fruit trees,
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 81





 


Tree - Fruit-Bearing
To The Top


Here there were unusual stones, brought in from the coast, shaped by centuries of tides; and all about were varieties of trees, large and small, some fruit-bearing, some ablaze with blossoms.
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 159





 


Tree - Hogarthe
To The Top


On that rise there were two trees, white-barked trees, some fifty feet tall, with shimmering green leaves. They stood within some thirty to forty feet of one another and both were outlined dramatically against the sky.

"What?" asked Cuwignaka.

I stared, tremblingly, at the lonely pair of trees. "The trees," I said. "The trees." They were Hogarthe trees, named for Hogarthe, one of the early explorers in the area of the Barrens. They are not uncommon in the vicinity of water in the Barrens, usually growing along the banks of small streams or muddy, sluggish rivers. Their shape is very reminiscent of poplar trees on Earth, to which, perhaps, in virtue of seeds brought to the Counter-Earth, they may be related.

"It is from those trees," said Cuwignaka, "that this place has its name."
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 300





 


Tree - Jungle
To The Top


There is an incredible variety of trees in the rain forest, how many I cannot conjecture. There are, however, more than fifteen hundred varieties and types of palm alone. Some of these palms have leaves which are twenty feet in length. One type of palm, the fan palm, more than twenty feet high, which spreads its leaves in the form of an opened fan, is an excellent source of pure water, as much as a liter of such water being found, almost as though cupped, at the base of each leaf's stem.
. . .
In the rain forest some trees grow and lose leaves all year long, remaining always in foliage. Others, though not at the same time, even in the same species, will lose their foliage for a few weeks and then again produce buds and a new set of leaves. They have maintained their cycles of regeneration but these cycles, interestingly, are often no longer synchronized with either the northern or southern winters and springs.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 310


In the rain forest we may distinguish three separate ecological zones, or tiers or levels. Each of these tiers, or levels or layers, is characterized by its own special forms of plant and animal life. These layers are marked off by divergent tree heights. The highest level or zone is that of the "emergents," that of those trees which have thrust themselves up above the dense canopies below them. This level is roughly from a hundred and twenty-five feet Gorean to two hundred feet Gorean. The second level is often spoken of as the canopy, or as that of the canopies. This is the fantastic green cover which constitutes the main ceiling of the jungle. It is what would dominate one's vision if one were passing over the jungle in tarn flight or viewing it from the height of a tall mountain. The canopy, or zone of the canopies, ranges from about sixty to one hundred and twenty-five feet high, Gorean measure. The first zone extends from the ground to the beginning of the canopies above, some sixty feet in height, Gorean measure. We may perhaps, somewhat loosely, speak of this first zone as the "floor," or, better, "ground zone," of the rain forest. In the level of the emergents there live primarily birds, in particular parrots, long-billed fleers, and needle-tailed lits. Monkeys and tree urts, and snakes and insects, however, can also be found in this highest level. In the second level, that of the canopies, is found an incredible variety of birds, warblers, finches, mindars, the crested lit and the common lit, the fruit tindel, the yellow gim, tanagers, some varieties of parrot, and many more. Here, too, may be found snakes and monkeys, gliding urts, leaf urts, squirrels, climbing, long-tailed porcupines, lizards, sloths, and the usual varieties of insects, ants, centipedes, scorpions, beetles and flies, and so on. In the lower portion of the canopies, too, can be found heavier birds, such as the ivory-billed woodpecker and the umbrella bird. Guernon monkeys, too, usually inhabit this level. In the ground zone, and on the ground itself, are certain birds, some flighted, like the hook-billed gort, which preys largely on rodents, such as ground urts, and the insectivorous whistling finch, and some unflighted, like the grub borer and lang gim. Along the river, of course, many other species of birds may be found, such as jungle gants, tufted fishers and ring-necked and yellow-legged waders. Also in the ground zone are varieties of snake, such as the ost and hith, and numerous species of insects. The rock spider has been mentioned, and termites, also. Termites, incidentally, are extremely important to the ecology of the forest. In their feeding they break down and destroy the branches and trunks of fallen trees. The termite "dust," thereafter, by the action of bacteria, is reduced to humus, and the humus to nitrogen and mineral materials. In the lower branches of the "ground zone" may be found, also, small animals, such as tarsiers, nocturnal jit monkeys, black squirrels, four-toed leaf urts, jungle varts and the prowling, solitary giani, tiny, cat-sized panthers, not dangerous to man. On the floor itself are also found several varieties of animal life, in particular marsupials, such as the armored gatch, and rodents, such as slees and ground urts. Several varieties of tarsk, large and small, also inhabit this zone. More than six varieties of anteater are also found here, and more than twenty kinds of small, fleet, single-horned tabuk. On the jungle floor, as well, are found jungle larls and jungle panthers, of diverse kinds, and many smaller catlike predators. These, on the whole, however, avoid men. They are less dangerous in the rain forest, generally, than in the northern latitudes. I do not know why this should be the case. Perhaps it is because in the rain forest food is usually plentiful for them, and, thus, there is little temptation for them to transgress the boundaries of their customary prey categories. They will, however, upon occasion, particularly if provoked or challenged, attack with dispatch. Conspicuously absent in the rain forests of the Ua were sleen. This is just as well for the sleen, commonly, hunts on the first scent it takes upon emerging from its burrow after dark. Moreover it hunts single-mindedly and tenaciously. It can be extremely dangerous to men, even more so, I think, than the Voltai, or northern, larl. I think the sleen, which is widespread on Gor, is not found, or not frequently found, in the jungles because of the enormous rains, and the incredible dampness and humidity. Perhaps the sleen, a burrowing, furred animal, finds itself uncomfortable in such a habitat. There is, however, a sleenlike animal, though much smaller, about two feet in length and some eight to ten pounds in weight, the zeder, which frequents the Ua and her tributaries. It knifes through the water by day and, at night, returns to its nest, built from sticks and mud in the branches of a tree overlooking the water.

I listened to the noises of the jungle night, the chattering, and the hootings, and the clickings and cries, of nocturnal animals, and birds and insects.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Pages 311 - 312





 


Tree - Ka-la-na
To The Top


Lastly, as the culmination of Ar's Planting Feast, and of the greatest importance to the plan of the Council of Ko-ro-ba, a member of the Ubar's family goes to the roof at night, under the three full moons with which the feast is correlated, and casts grain upon the stone and drops of a red winelike drink made from the fruit of the Ka-la-na tree.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 68


I was more pleased on the second day and made camp in a grassy veldt, dotted with the Ka-la-na trees.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 73


I set her down on a bed of green clover. Beyond it, some hundred yards away, I could see the border of a yellow field of Sa-Tarna and a yellow thicket of Ka-la-na trees.
. . .

"Over there," I said, "are some Ka-la-na trees. Wait here and I'll gather some fruit."
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 96


"I will show you how I treat the most treacherous wench on all Gor," I exclaimed, releasing her wrist. With both hands I wrenched the veil back from her face, thrusting my hand under it to fasten my fist in her hair and then, as if she were a common tavern girl or camp slut, I dragged the daughter of the Ubar of all Gor to the shelter of the Ka-la-na trees. Among the trees, on the clover, I threw her to my feet.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Pages 97 - 98


I picked some Ka-la-na fruit and opened one of the packages of rations. Talena returned and sat beside me on the grass. I shared the food with her.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 106


In the distance I could see some patches of yellow, the Ka-la-na groves that dot the fields of Gor.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 19


Black, scudding clouds again obscured the three moons of Gor, and the wind began to rise. I could see the shadows of tall Ka-la-na trees bending against the darkness of the night, their leaves lifting and rustling on the long branches.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 35


Once I brought the carcass of a tabuk, one of Gor's single-horned, yellow antelopes, which I had felled in a Ka-la-na thicket, to the hut of a peasant and his wife.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 48


Beyond Tharna and its gloomy soil, continually broken by its stony outcroppings, I could see the green fields of Gor, glades of yellow Ka-la-na trees, the shimmering surface of a placid lake and the bright blue sky, open and beckoning.
Outlaw of Gor     Book 2     Page 126


Aphris got up and fetched not a skin, but a bottle, of wine, Ka-la-na wine, from the Ka-la-na orchards of great Ar itself.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Pages 150 - 151


Besides several of the flower trees there were also some Ka-la-na trees, or the yellow wine trees of Gor;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 217


The logs had been prepared and carefully placed. There were hundreds of them, trimmed and squared, mostly of Ka-la-na wood, from the sweet-smelling wine trees of Gor.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 1


I had the Gorean short sword in its scabbard, my shield and helmet, and, wrapped in leather, a Gorean long bow of supple Ka-la-na wood, from the yellow wine trees of Gor,
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 2


Tur wood is used for galley frames, and beams and clamps and posts, and for hull planking; Ka-la-na serves for capstans and mastheads; Tem-wood for rudders and oars; and the needle trees, the evergreens, for masts and spars, and cabin and deck planking.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 141


And Thassa beneath us was suddenly streaked with the cold sunlight of Se'Kara, and the bird was across and through the storm. In the distance we could see rocky beaches, and grass and brushland beyond, and beyond that, a woodland, with Tur and Ka-la-na trees.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 284


In the distance, away from the forest, I could see a yellowish thicket, it, too, of trees, but not green, but bright and yellow.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 35


Fortunately for Targo he had managed to bring his caravan to the edge of a vast Ka-la-na thicket just before the tarnsmen struck. I had seen several such thickets when I was wandering alone in the fields.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 62


Softly, stealthily, the long bow of yellow Ka-la-na, from the wine trees of Gor, in my hand, I moved through the brush and trees.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 106


I carefully fitted the black, steel-piled tem-wood shaft to the string. I lifted the great bow of yellow Ka-la-na, from the wine trees of Gor.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Pages 111 - 112


I found a black tem-wood arrow, a sheaf arrow, and fitted it unsteadily to the string of the great bow, the yellow bow, from the wine trees of Gor.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 125


Lumber, of course, is a valuable commodity. It is generally milled and taken northward. Torvaldsland, though not treeless, is bleak. In it, fine Ka-la-na wood, for example, and supple tem-wood, cannot grow. These two woods are prized in the north. A hall built with Ka-la-na wood, for example, is thought a great luxury.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 28


We stood at the top of the hill, in the grass, in the shade of some Ka-la-na trees, the yellow wine trees of Gor.
Fighting Slave of Gor     Book 14     Page 375


Twice had he struck on the bars of the sea gate, each time with the Ka-la-na shaft of his spear, not with the side of its broad tapering bronze point.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 7


She looked at the wall, to her left, at a picture, a landscape. It seemed a strange landscape, in its way, with gentle yellow trees nestled in a valley, and, in the distance, a range of scarlet mountains.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 39


"Ka-la-na?" she asked.

"Yes," he said. "A wine."

There are many ka-la-nas, but the one in the colored glass, if it had been in a clear glass, would have been golden in color. The reddish color of the glass infused its contents with something of its own hue.

"From the wine trees of Gor," he said.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 197


She was forbidden to leave the ka-la-na thicket.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 353


One gathers that ka-la-na wood, common on Gor from her wine trees, would have been preferable for the launching device, or bow, which Cabot had prepared, carved into its gentle arc with a sharp stone, but such are not found in the world.


I had never tasted ka-la-na but I had gathered there were a great many varieties, differing much in quality. Some Ubars might barter a city or a hundred slaves for a given flask of the beverage. Others were so cheap and common that, as the joke goes, they might be mixed with the swill of tarsk. The word itself, which is generic for several wines, derives from the ka-la-na trees, or wine trees, of Gor. But wines, as is well known, may be derived not only from the clustered fruits weighting the branches of the ka-la-na tree in the autumn, but, as on my former world, from vine fruit, tree fruit, bush fruit, even from some types of leaves.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 295


"On the islands," I said, "there are many stands of ka-la-na."

"Wine trees," said Tab.

"The wood is strong, and supple," I said.
Avengers of Gor     Book 36     Page 92





 


Tree - Needle
To The Top


Tur wood is used for galley frames, and beams and clamps and posts, and for hull planking; Ka-la-na serves for capstans and mastheads; Tem-wood for rudders and oars; and the needle trees, the evergreens, for masts and spars, and cabin and deck planking.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 141


It contained as well the separated oil of the Thentis needle tree;
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 114


"As many as the stones of the beaches," said the Kur "as many as the needles on the needle trees."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 172


A small fire, of sweet-brush and needles, from needle trees, is then built.
Blood Brothers of Gor     Book 18     Page 308


I had cut my camp into the side of a small, brush-covered hill, west of the road. The natural slope of the hill would not suggest a leveling at this point. A needle tree provided practical cover from the sky.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 67


Before dawn the tarn train once more landed, this time amongst a cluster of small hills, covered with needle trees, evergreen trees, and took its shelter in a narrow ravine.
Prize of Gor     Book 27     Page 353


The great arsenal at Port Kar has its shipyards, as well as its warehouses and wharves. To guarantee a supply of valuable, suitable timber, for example Tur trees for strakes, keels, and planking, needle trees for masts, and tem wood, the rare yellow tem wood, for oars, the arsenal claims and badges selected trees within given ditched areas in the northern forests, which supplies, largely in a raw state, together with others, more processed, such as tars, resins and turpentines, items primarily suitable for naval stores, are transported southward on Thassa to the Tamber gulf.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 28


Needle trees, of which there were none here, are usually used for masts. They are a softer wood, and, less rigid, more flexible, are more inclined to bend with the wind and the yard, and so, under certain conditions, violent conditions, less likely to snap. Too, the wood is lighter and this is useful in the raising and lowering of masts. The yards, too, as would be supposed, are commonly of needle wood. Needle trees, too, come to maturity more rapidly than Tur trees, and may thus be the sooner and the more frequently harvested.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 147


"The main timbers of the ship," said Tarl Cabot, "are Tur wood. It burns longer than softer wood, such as that of needle trees, but it is harder to ignite."
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Pages 262 - 263


The wood of the Tur tree is closely grained. It is much easier to fell Needle Trees.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 129





 


Tree - Olive
To The Top


Clitus, too, had brought two bottles of Ka-la-na wine, a string of eels, cheese of the Verr, and a sack of red olives from the groves of Tyros.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 114





 


Tree - Palm
To The Top


I then released the blond girl from the palm tree and, tying her ankles, threw her with the rest.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 397


There is an incredible variety of trees in the rain forest, how many I cannot conjecture. There are, however, more than fifteen hundred varieties and types of palm alone. Some of these palms have leaves which are twenty feet in length.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 310





 


Tree - Palm - Date
To The Top


The principal export of the oases are dates and pressed-date bricks. Some of the date palms grow to more than a hundred feet high. It takes ten years before they begin to bear fruit. They will then yield fruit for more than a century. A given tree, annually, yields between one and five Gorean weights of fruit. A weight is some ten stone, or some forty Earth pounds. A great amount of farming, or perhaps one should speak of gardening, is done at the oasis, but little of this is exported.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37


I distended my nostrils, screening the scents of the room. I rejected the smell of moldy straw, of wastes. From outside I could smell date palms, pomegranates.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 115


In the neighborhood of noon, moving slowly, in the yellow and purple striped burnoose, with sash, water bags at the flanks of my kaiila, sacks of pressed-date bricks tied across the withers, kaiila bells ringing, calling attention to myself and my wares, I left the oasis. Once, the lofty palms small behind me, I had to turn aside, to avoid being buffeted by the return of the last of the search parties.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 135


"We have water," said the merchant, greeting the bandit. Hassan stood in his stirrups, looking about at the palms, the red-clay walls, the buildings of mud, some domed, of the oasis, the gardens.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 152


I looked about me. In the moonlight I could see that kaiila had trodden the gardens. I saw two walls broken, the high walls of red clay used to shade courtyards and as a protection against raiders. I counted eleven palm trees, date palms, cut down, their trunks fallen at an angle into the dust, the palm leaves dried and lifeless, the fruit unripened. It takes years for such a tree to grow to the point at which it will bear fruit.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 152 - 153


I could see the buildings, whitish, with domes, the palms, the gardens, the high, circling walls of red clay.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 172


It was the next day, at the eleventh Ahn, one Ahn past the Gorean noon, that we arrived at the Oasis of Red Rock.

It was dominated by the kasbah of its pasha, Turem a'Din, commander of the local Tashid clans, on its rim to the northeast. There were five palm groves. At the east of the oasis lay pomegranate orchards. Toward its lower parts, in its center, were the gardens. Between two of the groves of date palms there was a large pool.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 175


From the roof we could see men and women, and children, running through the palm groves and gardens.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 182


Four days ago, at dawn, Tarna, at the head of her men, left the Oasis of the Battle of Red Rock in flames. Only its citadel, its kasbah, had been impregnable. Its palm groves had been cut down, its gardens destroyed, four of its five public wells caved in and filled.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Pages 188 - 189





 


Tree - Palm - Fan
To The Top


There is an incredible variety of trees in the rain forest, how many I cannot conjecture. There are, however, more than fifteen hundred varieties and types of palm alone. Some of these palms have leaves which are twenty feet in length. One type of palm, the fan palm, more than twenty feet high, which spreads its leaves in the form of an opened fan, is an excellent source of pure water, as much as a liter of such water being found, almost as though cupped, at the base of each leaf's stem.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 310


I then rose to my feet and walked a few yards away, to a fan palm. From the base of one of its broad leaves I gathered a double handful of fresh water.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 347


We had drunk earlier, from the water cupped at the base of the leaves of fan palms.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 349


After a time I pulled her away from it and, again using the tether as a leash, led her to a fan palm. I tied the tether to the fan palm. "Drink," I told her. "Yes, Master," she said. While she quenched her thirst, and then knelt beside the fan palm, I destroyed the signs of our encampment.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 371





 


Tree - Palm - Oil
To The Top


Kisu, with a knife, was cutting a length from the rough, red-dyed cloth, plaited and pounded, derived from the inner bark of the pod tree, which we had obtained in trade some days ago at the fishermen's village. It has a cordage of bark strips resembling a closely woven burlap, but it is much softer, a result in part perhaps due to the fact that the dye in which it is prepared is mixed with palm oil.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 294





 


Tree - Palm - Palm
To The Top


"Why is that girl blindfolded?" I asked, indicating a girl, kneeling with other girls, chained, under a low, palm-thatched platform.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 123


In spite of the fact that he was not at full inventory he crowded his girls, leaving several of the small, open-sided, palm-thatched shelters, those about the outer wall, a low, boarded wall, empty.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 124


A small wooden hut, with a roof thatched with palm leaves, at one corner of the compound, served as house and office for Uchafu and, I suspect, dormitory for his assistants.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 125


Both were blue-eyed. They crouched in the mud, chained, beneath the palm-thatched roof of the tiny shelter.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 128


Back on the shore, almost invisible in the jungle, were the huts of the village. On the palm-thatched roofs of these huts, in rows, exposed to the sun, were drying fish.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 284


We were within a stick-sided, palm-thatched hut in the fishing village. A small fire in a clay bowl dimly illuminated the interior of the hut. There were shelves in the hut, of sticks, on which were vessels and masks.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 286


Some of the small men then hurried about the depression striking at the beast with palm leaves, distracting it, infuriating it.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 391


I tied the blond girl by her hair to a slender palm and strode back to the nets.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 397





 


Tree - Palm - Wine
To The Top


Schendi's most significant exports are doubtless spice and hides, with kailiauk horn and horn products also being of great importance. One of her most delicious exports is palm wine.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 115


"My recommendation," said Ayari, "would be to stab him when he is not looking, or perhaps to poison his palm wine."
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 429





 


Tree - Pod
To The Top


The results of our trading had been two baskets of dried fish, a sack of meal and vegetables, a length of bark cloth, plaited and pounded, from the pod tree, dyed red,
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 287


Kisu, with a knife, was cutting a length from the rough, red-dyed cloth, plaited and pounded, derived from the inner bark of the pod tree, which we had obtained in trade some days ago at the fishermen's village. It has a cordage of bark strips resembling a closely woven burlap, but it is much softer, a result in part perhaps due to the fact that the dye in which it is prepared is mixed with palm oil.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 294


Tende knelt before Kisu and put her head to the dirt. "I beg clothing, Master," she said.

"Earn it," said he to her.

"Yes, Master," she said, eagerly, and then well did she earn it. When she was finished Kisu threw her the strip of cloth which she then, delightedly, wrapped about her hips, tucking it closed. He then, from a sack brought from the canoe, threw her two strings of colored wooden beads, blue, and red and yellow, which we had obtained in trade from the fishing village earlier.

"Thank you, my master," breathed Tende, and she then displayed herself before him, the brief bark cloth, scarlet, snug about her hips and the beads about her lovely throat.
. . .

Alice, her wrists bound now behind her, tethered by them to a tree, to which Tende lay similarly secured, lay asleep. About her hips was the wrap-around skirt, tucked shut, of scarlet bark cloth, which she had well earned. I had cut the skirt for her following her performance.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Pages 296 - 297


I cut a length from the red bark cloth, about five feet in length and a foot in width. I wrapped it about the sweetness of her slave hips and tucked it in. I pushed it down so that her navel might be well revealed. It is called the "slave belly" on Gor. Only slave girls, on Gor, reveal their navels.
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 334





 


Tree - Scent
To The Top


"I think it will rain today," I said.

"No, noble one," he said.

"How do you know?" I asked.

"The petals of the golden cup are open," he said, "the zar swarm is not aflight, the lavender leaves of the scent tree do not curl."
Rebels of Gor     Book 33     Page 220





 


Tree - Shore
To The Top


It was similar to the tiny lung fish I had seen earlier on the river, those little creatures clinging to the half-submerged roots of shore trees,
Explorers of Gor     Book 13     Page 384





 


Tree - Stunted
To The Top


There was a great cheer from the men of Ivar Forkbeard. The serpent turned slowly between the high cliffs, and entered the inlet. Here and there, clinging to the rock, were lichens, and small bushes, and even stunted trees. The water below us was deep and cold.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 80


Upon reflection, however, it seemed to me not so strange that this should be so, in a bleak country, one in which many of the trees, too would be stunted and wind-twisted.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 90


No grass grows about these water holes because many animals are brought to them and graze it to the earth. They are usually muddy ponds, with some stunted trees about; centered in the midst of an extensive radius of grassless, cracked, dry earth.
Tribesmen of Gor     Book 10     Page 37





 


Tree - Swamp Forest
To The Top


I climbed again to the saddle of my tarn, drew back on the one-strap, and rose above the lush trees of the swamp forest.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 74


When I opened my eyes, I found myself partially adhering to a vast network of broad, elastic strands that formed a structure, perhaps a pasang in width, and through which at numerous points projected the monstrous trees of the swamp forest.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 81


Luckily I did immediately as he had advised, fixing my grip deep in the long black hairs that covered his thorax, for Nar suddenly raced to a nearby swamp tree and scuttled high into its branches.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 84


Without thinking, I leaped from the back of Nar, seizing one of the long, tendril-like vines that parasitically interlace the gnarled forms of the swamp trees.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 85


After a journey of an hour or so Nar stopped and pointed ahead with one of his forelegs. About three or four pasangs distant, through the thinning swamp trees, I could see the verdant meadows of Ar's Sa-Tarna land.
Tarnsman of Gor     Book 1     Page 94





 


Tree - Tem-Wood
To The Top


The lances are black, cut from the poles of young tem trees. They may be bent almost double, like finely tempered steel, before they break.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 15


there was also, at one side of the garden, against the far wall, a grove of tem-wood, linear, black, supple.
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 217


I turned about and walked back on the perch and again stood on the thick, beamed framework of tem-wood that formed the vast housing for numerous racing birds.
Assassin of Gor     Book 5     Page 170


Tur wood is used for galley frames, and beams and clamps and posts, and for hull planking; Ka-la-na serves for capstans and mastheads; Tem-wood for rudders and oars; and the needle trees, the evergreens, for masts and spars, and cabin and deck planking.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 141


At my hip was slung the quiver, with sheaf arrows, twenty of them, of black tem wood, piled with steel, winged with the feathers of the Vosk gull.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 106


I carefully fitted the black, steel-piled tem-wood shaft to the string. I lifted the great bow of yellow Ka-la-na, from the wine trees of Gor.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Pages 111 - 112


I found a black tem-wood arrow, a sheaf arrow, and fitted it unsteadily to the string of the great bow, the yellow bow, from the wine trees of Gor.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 125


Lumber, of course, is a valuable commodity. It is generally milled and taken northward. Torvaldsland, though not treeless, is bleak. In it, fine Ka-la-na wood, for example, and supple tem-wood, cannot grow. These two woods are prized in the north.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 28


The shafts of the kaiila lances are black, supple and strong; they are made of tem wood, a wood much favored on Gor for this type of purpose. Staves for the lances are cut in the late winter, when the sap is down. Such wood, in the long process of smoking and drying over the lodge fire, which consumes several weeks, seasoning the wood and killing any insects which might remain in it, seldom splits or cracks. Similarly, old-growth wood, or second-growth wood, which is tougher, is preferred over the fresher, less dense first-growth, or new-growth, wood.
After drying, the shafts are rubbed with grease and straightened over the heat of a fire. Detailed trimming and shaping is accomplished with a small knife. A rubbing with sandstone supplies a smooth finish.
Savages of Gor     Book 17     Page 43


As I have mentioned, the arrows, of tem wood, are precious to the rencers, that wood not being indigenous to the delta.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 338


The great arsenal at Port Kar has its shipyards, as well as its warehouses and wharves. To guarantee a supply of valuable, suitable timber, for example Tur trees for strakes, keels, and planking, needle trees for masts, and tem wood, the rare yellow tem wood, for oars, the arsenal claims and badges selected trees within given ditched areas in the northern forests, which supplies, largely in a raw state, together with others, more processed, such as tars, resins and turpentines, items primarily suitable for naval stores, are transported southward on Thassa to the Tamber gulf.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 28


It seemed less a beam than a narrow, springy rod.

"That will not hold my weight," I said, "let alone yours."

"Nonsense," he said, "it is tem wood. In the south it is used for lances, it can bend almost double before snapping."

"I cannot walk on that," I said. "It is too narrow." I was sure it was little more than an inch in width, if that.

"It weighs little," said Kurik, "and can be handled easily with one hand, as might be a rod."

"It is black," I said, "it is hard to see, it is night!"

"All tem wood is black," he said.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Pages 356 - 357





 


Tree - Tem-Wood - Yellow
To The Top


The great arsenal at Port Kar has its shipyards, as well as its warehouses and wharves. To guarantee a supply of valuable, suitable timber, for example Tur trees for strakes, keels, and planking, needle trees for masts, and tem wood, the rare yellow tem wood, for oars, the arsenal claims and badges selected trees within given ditched areas in the northern forests, which supplies, largely in a raw state, together with others, more processed, such as tars, resins and turpentines, items primarily suitable for naval stores, are transported southward on Thassa to the Tamber gulf.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 28





 


Tree - Thentis Needle
To The Top


That scent, I knew, a distillation of a hundred flowers, nurtured like a priceless wine, was a secret guarded by the perfumers of Ar. It contained as well the separated oil of the Thentis needle tree; an extract from the glands of the Cartius river urt; and a preparation formed from a disease calculus scraped from the intestines of the rare Hunjer Long Whale, the result of the inadequate digestion of cuttlefish. Fortunately, too, this calculus is sometimes found free in the sea, expelled with feces. It took more than a year to distill, age, blend and bond the ingredients.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 114


Prior to his winning the swimming he had won talmits for climbing the "mast", a tall pole of needle wood, some fifty feet high, smoothed and peeled
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 140


"How many of you have gathered?" asked Svein Blue Tooth again.

"As many," said the Kur, "as the stones on the beaches, as many as the needles on the needle trees."
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 174





 


Tree - Tiny
To The Top


It had been my intention to circle about, though the shrubbery, and the tiny, lovely trees in the garden, to the vicinity of the fountain.
Witness of Gor     Book 26     Page 40





 


Tree - Tospit
To The Top


On the way back to the hall, cutting through the tospit trees, we had passed by the sul patch.
Marauders of Gor     Book 9     Page 103





 


Tree - Tur
To The Top


there was one large-trunked, reddish Tur tree, about which curled its assemblage of Tur-Pah, a vinelike tree parasite with curled, scarlet, ovate leaves, rather lovely to look upon; the leaves of the Tur-Pah incidentally are edible and figure in certain Gorean dishes, such as sullage, a kind of soup; long ago, I had heard, a Tur tree was found on the prairie, near a spring, planted perhaps long before by someone who passed by; it was from that Tur tree that the city of Turia took its name;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 217


Tur wood is used for galley frames, and beams and clamps and posts, and for hull planking; Ka-la-na serves for capstans and mastheads; Tem-wood for rudders and oars; and the needle trees, the evergreens, for masts and spars, and cabin and deck planking.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 141


Within the arsenal itself there are numerous basins, providing a plenitude of water.
. . .
The large basins, just mentioned, are of two types; the first, unroofed, is used for the underwater storage and seasoning of Tur wood;
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 147


And Thassa beneath us was suddenly streaked with the cold sunlight of Se'Kara, and the bird was across and through the storm. In the distance we could see rocky beaches, and grass and brushland beyond, and beyond that, a woodland, with Tur and Ka-la-na trees.
Raiders of Gor     Book 6     Page 284


It had been difficult making our way through the brush and thickset trees. To reach the high trees of the forest, the great Tur trees, would be perhaps better than another hour's trek.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 122


Then, after perhaps another hour, we came, almost abruptly, suddenly, to a stand of the high trees, the Tur trees, of the northern forests.

It was breathtakingly beautiful.

The girls stopped.

I looked about myself. The forests of the northern temperate latitudes of Gor are countries in themselves, covering hundreds of thousands of square pasangs of area. They contain great numbers of various species of trees, and different portions of the forests may differ considerably among themselves. The most typical and famous tree of these forests is the lofty, reddish Tur tree, some varieties of which grow more than two hundred feet high. It is not known how far these forests extend. It is not impossible that they belt the land surfaces of the planet. They begin near the shores of Thassa, the Sea, in the west. How far they extend to the east is not known. They do extend beyond the most northern ridges of the Thentis Mountains.

We found ourselves now in a stand of the lofty Tur trees. I could see broadly spreading branches some two hundred feet or more above my head. The trunks of the trees were almost bare of branches until, so far above, branches seemed to explode in an interlacing blanket of foliage, almost obliterating the sky. I could see glimpses of the three moons high above. The floor of the forest was almost bare. Between the lofty, widely spaced trees there was little but a carpeting of leaves.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 129


After some hundred yards I came to the edge of a clearing. It was some twenty-five to thirty yards in diameter, ringed by the lofty trunks of Tur trees.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 131


Sometimes I ran between the great Tur trees, on the carpeting of leaves between them, sometimes I made my way through more thickset trees, sometimes through wild, moonlit tangles of brush and vines. I even found myself, once, when passing through the high Tur trees, at the circle, where the panther girls had danced.
Captive of Gor     Book 7     Page 180


Somewhere, far off, but carrying through the forest, was the rapid, staccato slap of the sharp beak of the yellow-breasted hermit bird, pounding into the reddish bark of the tur tree, hunting for larvae.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 106


I lay in the center of a clearing. I could see lofty Tur trees surrounding the clearing. We were deep in the forest, somewhere within one of the stands of the mighty Tur trees. I could see them, on all sides, at the edges of the clearing, rising beautifully a hundred, two hundred feet toward the blackness of the Gorean night, the brightness of the stars, and then, almost at the top, exploding into a broad canopying of interlaced branches. I could see the stars overhead. But through the leafed branches of the trees I could catch only glimpses of them.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 127


She looked up at the moons. I could now see them beginning to emerge from behind the leaves and high branches of the encircling Tur trees.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 131


Two, whom I had encountered, were nearby. They were bound and gagged. I had tied them to a small Tur tree.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 213


I lay in the center of a clearing. I could see lofty Tur trees surrounding the clearing. We were deep in the forest, somewhere within one of the stands of the mighty Tur trees. I could see them, on all sides, at the edges of the clearing, rising beautifully a hundred, two hundred feet toward the blackness of the Gorean night, the brightness of the stars, and then, almost at the top, exploding into a broad canopying of interlaced branches. I could see the stars overhead. But through the leafed branches of the trees I could catch only glimpses of them.
Hunters of Gor     Book 8     Page 127


"I know where the Avenue of Turia is," I said. It is named for the city in the southern hemisphere, incidentally, doubtless as a gesture of amicability on the part of Ar. Stately Tur trees, appropriately enough, line its walks. It is a broad avenue with fountains. It is well known for its exclusive shops. "It is in the vicinity of the Street of Brands."
Mercenaries of Gor     Book 21     Page 267


She then lay on her back, in the sand, looking up. We were near a Tur tree.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 361


"Hist!" said Titus, from the branches of the Tur tree.
Vagabonds of Gor     Book 24     Page 365


In a few Ehn we were on the Avenue of Turia, one of the major avenues in Ar. It is lined with Tur trees.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 104


We turned to look at the street. Approaching, singing, was a group of youths, in rows, a sports team, marching together. Their colors were of both Ar and Cos. Such teams, drawn from various parts of the city, competed in various games, in hurling the stone, in hurling the thonged javelin, both for distance and accuracy, in races of various sorts, in jumping, in wrestling, and such. There were meets, and local championships, with awards, such as fillets of the wool of the bounding hurt, dyed different colors, and for champions, crowns woven of the leaves of the mighty Tur tree.
Magicians of Gor     Book 25     Page 206


Before engaging in this endeavor he had, within the forest, placed his prisoner, still leashed and gagged, on her belly in the leaves before a lofty Tur tree, and knelt across her body. He had then freed her hands and turned her about, and retied them before her body. He had then, turning her again to her belly, with one strand of the double-braided leash, fastened her hands, already bound, closely against her belly, and knotted the holding strap behind the small of her back. With the second strand of the leash he improvised a sling and, with one loop under her arms and the other behind the back of her knees, and she behind him, he began to climb the tree. On a high branch, some seventy or eighty feet above the ground, he sat her back against the trunk of the tree, and, with the second strand of the leash, fastened her in place, by the feet, belly, and neck. The height, he hoped, and her silence, would protect her from predators, of various sorts. The branches would be likely to break beneath a larl and the sleen, a ground animal, is reluctant to climb.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 199 - 200


He had selected, one evening, in the dusk, two likely branches from a young Tur tree, a tree which is found on Gor, a reddish tree which, when mature, is lofty and broadly leaved, and had shaped them to his purpose.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Page 369


The great arsenal at Port Kar has its shipyards, as well as its warehouses and wharves. To guarantee a supply of valuable, suitable timber, for example Tur trees for strakes, keels, and planking, needle trees for masts, and tem wood, the rare yellow tem wood, for oars, the arsenal claims and badges selected trees within given ditched areas in the northern forests, which supplies, largely in a raw state, together with others, more processed, such as tars, resins and turpentines, items primarily suitable for naval stores, are transported southward on Thassa to the Tamber gulf.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 28


We stood before a reserve.

The trees were spaced, yards apart, and were lofty. There was a solemnity about the vista, as with colonnades stretching into far shadows, a world of living columns, with capitals of shimmering foliage.

They were Tur trees.

These are used mostly for strakes, keels, beams, and planking.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 147


"It is a simple legend," I said. "It says 'These are the trees of Port Kar.'"

"This is the reserve of Port Kar then," he said.

"One of them," I said. "These seem to be Tur trees, all Tur trees."

I went to one of the trees a few yards back and to the left. It was tagged. It wore the badge of Port Kar.
"This beauty," I said, looking upward, "has been marked. It is selected, marked for the arsenal, for the yard of Cleomenes." I supposed it would be harvested in the fall, when it would have finished its season's growth.
Swordsmen of Gor     Book 29     Page 150


Surely wind had always whispered in the tall green grass, and stirred the shimmering leaves of the Tur tree.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 182


"The main timbers of the ship," said Tarl Cabot, "are Tur wood. It burns longer than softer wood, such as that of needle trees, but it is harder to ignite."
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Pages 262 - 263



The wood of the Tur tree is closely grained. It is much easier to fell Needle Trees.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 129


I knew enough of the forest within the wands to recognize many things outside them which might be eaten; leafy Tur-Pah, parasitic on Tur trees, of course, but, too, certain plants whose roots were edible, as the wild Sul; and there were flat ground pods in tangles which I could tear open, iron fruit whose shells might be broken between rocks, and autumn gim berries, purple and juicy, perhaps named for the bird, whose cast fruit lies under the snow, the seeds surviving until spring, when one in a thousand might germinate.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 243


"There is a large stand of Tur trees, west of the dock, near the wands, well twined with Tur-Pah," said Relia. "Men with climbing tools have freed much of it. It has been drying on racks since yesterday. Fill one basket, and no more. Deliver it to our kitchen."
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 230


I knew enough of the forest within the wands to recognize many things outside them which might be eaten; leafy Tur-Pah, parasitic on Tur trees,
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 243


I put my hands out, and, in a moment, felt the bark of a tree, a Tur tree.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 266


I noted Tur-Pah clinging about nearby Tur trees. The Tur tree is tall and hardy, and the common host to Tur-Pah but Tur-Pah interestingly, does not thrive on all Tur trees. The difference apparently has to do with the grades and natures of the soil in which the tree is rooted.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 267


Genserich spun about, startled, twisting to the side, Donna screaming, and the blade of the flung javelin, a flash of steel, tore through the collar of his tunic, leaving a tatter of cloth and a line of blood between his neck and shoulder, and lodged twenty paces beyond, quivering in a small Tur tree at the camp's edge.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Pages 425 - 426


Already, at night, more than once, cuddled in the leaves, I had longed for my kennel blanket. The leaves of the Tur trees had begun to turn.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 429


The wagon rolled from the Viktel Aria, and stopped in the shade of a Tur tree, some yards from the well.
Plunder of Gor     Book 34     Page 604





 


Tree - Tur-Pah
To The Top


there was one large-trunked, reddish Tur tree, about which curled its assemblage of Tur-Pah, a vinelike tree parasite with curled, scarlet, ovate leaves, rather lovely to look upon; the leaves of the Tur-Pah incidentally are edible and figure in certain Gorean dishes, such as sullage, a kind of soup;
Nomads of Gor     Book 4     Page 217


the curled, red, ovate leaves of the Tur-Pah, a tree parasite, cultivated in host orchards of Tur trees,
Priest-Kings of Gor     Book 3     Page 44 - 45


He watched with some fascination as beads of water formed on the leaves of rock-climbing Turpah, a parasitic but edible growth commonly adhering to the bark of the Tur tree.
Kur of Gor     Book 28     Pages 202 - 203


Men on ropes, in shifts, for days now, had scraped and tore away the tendrils which had begun to clutch at the hull, and sought to climb it, as Tur-Pah the Tur tree.
Mariners of Gor     Book 30     Page 220


Gratefully I lowered my burden, and sank to my side in the fallen leaves. As I lay, I could see, on the trunk of a nearby tree, a yellowish stain, at about what would be the eye level of a large man. I recalled that, once or twice before, not thinking about it, I had seen a similar stain. I supposed it might be a form of unusual moss, or some sort of parasitic growth.
Smugglers of Gor     Book 32     Page 111















 



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